School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 81 Results

  • Maira Karan

    Maira Karan

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychiatry

    BioMaira Karan is a postdoctoral fellow in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. Her research focuses on how positive human behaviors, such as empathy and prosociality, develop during the period of adolescence and how the adolescent brain and body mature in concert to support these positive behaviors. She has examined the development of these behaviors using experimental tasks, validated questionnaires, ecological momentary assessments, longitudinal assessments, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Another line of her work examines how sleep affects adolescent health and well-being with a special focus on circadian rhythms. At Stanford, she is working on merging her two lines of research to assess how sleep and circadian timing relate to prosocial behaviors. In addition to conducting research, she has a deep passion for uplifting underrepresented individuals in(to) the fields of psychology and neuroscience.

  • Krishna Govinda Kary (they/them)

    Krishna Govinda Kary (they/them)

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Krishna Kary (they/them) is a licensed psychologist who specializes in working with adolescents, adults, and couples within the LGBTQ+ community to address concerns related to depression, anxiety, sexuality, identity and interpersonal challenges. Dr. Kary received their PhD in Counseling Psychology from the Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology program at the University of California, Santa Barbara. They received their MA and BS from Santa Clara University in Counseling and Psychology, respectively. Their clinical internship was completed at the University of California, Los Angeles Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and their postdoctoral Gender and Sexual Identities fellowship at Stanford University CAPS. Dr. Kary serves patients through the THRIVE clinic at the Stanford School of Medicine and is emotion-focused, collaborative, and culturally-sensitive in their approach to psychotherapy. In addition to their interest in clinical care, they also enjoy supervision and training, teaching, and consultation related to gender inclusivity practices.

  • Laura B. Kasper, PhD

    Laura B. Kasper, PhD

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioI am psychologist and have been practicing psychotherapy for over 18 years. I have experience working with a diverse group of clients with respect to presenting concerns, gender, sexual orientation, and race/ethnicity.

    Regardless of their background, the majority of my clients are highly intelligent and accomplished people who are interested in taking their personal and professional relationships to the next level, starting with themselves. My therapeutic approach blends my first-hand experience of the high-performing professional workplace with buddhist psychology and tools to offer support that is unrelentingly compassionate, direct, and powerful.

    I have particular research and clinical expertise in authenticity with one's self and in relationships, interpersonal communication, and issues of sexual orientation, gender, and sexuality. My services include individual, couples, and group psychotherapy. I also do video counseling sessions with individuals and couples in CA, DC and VA, the places where I am licensed.

    I earned my master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Maryland’s Counseling Psychology program. I completed my internship and post-doctoral training, and was a Staff Psychologist at the The George Washington University Counseling Center for several years before starting my private practice. I am currently in the Interpersonal Dynamics Facilitator Training Program at Stanford University in the Graduate School of Business to become a small group facilitator for their popular elective, Interpersonal Dynamics.

    I have been practicing Vipassana meditation for over fifteen years. I’ve spent eighty-five days on silent meditation retreats in that time, and have a mindfulness orientation to my work.

    I am a member of the American Group Psychotherapy Association and the Northern California Group Psychotherapy Society, and the Northern California Society for Psychoanalytic Psychology. I am licensed and insured in California (PSY28532), Washington D.C. (PSY1000362) and Virginia (PSY0810004715).

  • Max Kasun

    Max Kasun

    Research Professional, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioMax Kasun works in the Roberts Ethics Lab and Kim Ethics Lab at Stanford, which use empirical methods to help anticipate, clarify and resolve ethical issues in modern biomedical research. He received his BA in 2016 from the University of Wisconsin. He has interests in empirical and normative thought related to increasing scientific understanding and societal appreciation of the nature and prevalence of mental disorders and well-being, as well as in moral philosophy (e.g. Kantian ethics, justice, ethical naturalism, and pragmatism), cognitive science, and philosophy of mind (e.g. embodiment and personhood). He has co-authored scientific, peer-reviewed articles and other scholarly work investigating ethical issues in psychiatric research ethics and neuroscience, and is currently working on a project investigating ethical issues encountered in medical uses of machine learning and artificial intelligence.

  • Makoto Kawai

    Makoto Kawai

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Sleep Medicine

    BioI am a physician scientist in the field of sleep medicine in aging and brain function. Using combined polysomnogram and novel neuroimaging technology, I aim to identify potential sleep biomarkers to investigate the mechanism of progression from normal aging to Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) or dementia. I also investigate the impact of sleep on cognitive/affective function or behavior abnormality in various neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders.

  • Debra Lee Kaysen

    Debra Lee Kaysen

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health & Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMuch of my current research focus is on the development of testing of accessible, scaleable, and effective treatments for trauma-related disorders and related comorbidities (e.g. substance use disorders, HIV, mood disorders). This work has focused on addressing trauma-related disorders especially in underserved populations and settings. This includes research in rural communities, with Native American communities, and with sexual minorities. My research has had a strong impact on building an evidence base on adaptations of psychotherapies for PTSD and substance use disorders for diverse populations both within and outside the United States. Our findings demonstrate that complex cognitive behavioral psychotherapies like Cognitive Processing Therapy can be culturally adapted and delivered in challenging settings (conflict settings, high poverty environments) with significant and lasting change in PTSD, depression, and functioning. This has led to work adapting CPT for diverse populations within the United States (rural Native Americans, urban Latinos) and outside of it (Iraq, DRC). Other research has focused on treatment for PTSD/SUD. My research has also found support for the use of brief telehealth interventions to build treatment engagement and to reduce drinking among trauma-exposed populations. In addition, my work has been critical in testing the feasibility of novel trauma-focused interventions for use by those with PTSD and SUD, thus paving the road for more rigorous research studies.

    Current PI'ed research studies include: 1) developing and evaluating a brief motivational interviewing intervention designed to increase treatment-seeking among military personnel with untreated PTSD; a two-arm randomized comparative effectiveness trial to evaluate prevention of HIV/STI sexual risk behavior by addressing PTSD through Narrative Exposure Therapy or substance use through Motivational Interviewing among Native American men and women with PTSD; and 3) a comparison of outcomes among patients randomized to initially receive pharmacotherapy or Written Exposure Therapy delivered in primary care as well as comparing outcomes among patients randomized to treatment sequences (i.e., switching and augmenting) for patients who do not respond to the initial treatment.