School of Medicine


Showing 81-90 of 129 Results

  • Seung K. Kim  M.D., Ph.D.

    Seung K. Kim M.D., Ph.D.

    KM Mulberry Professor, Professor of Developmental Biology, of Medicine (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the development of pancreatic islet cells using molecular, embryologic and genetic methods in several model systems, including mice, pigs, human pancreas, embryonic stem cells, and Drosophila. Our work suggests that critical factors required for islet development are also needed to maintain essential functions of the mature islet. These approaches have informed efforts to generate replacement islets from renewable sources for diabetes.

  • Sun Kim, M.D. M.S.

    Sun Kim, M.D. M.S.

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in studying the pathophysiological processes that contribute to glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. My current research focuses on characterizing pancreatic beta-cell function in populations with significant insulin resistance and vulnerability to developing diabetes: individuals with schizophrenia, morbid obesity, and history of gestational diabetes.

  • W. Ray Kim

    W. Ray Kim

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    BioChronic liver disease is one of the most common causes of premature death in Americans. My career goal is to improve the outcome of individuals with chronic liver disease by identifying the optimal means for diagnosis, monitoring, treatment and prevention. The path I have chosen to achieve this goal is through engagement in clinical epidemiology and patient-oriented, effectiveness research.

    Since the development of the MELD score which recognizes the importance of renal function in the prognosis of patients with end stage liver disease, one of the areas that we have had intense interest has been acute and chronic renal injury in patients undergoing liver transplantation. Liver transplantation represents a unique opportunity for research, because of the potential for reversal of the renal injury as well as access to biological materials.

  • Yeuen Kim

    Yeuen Kim

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioYeuen Kim MD MAS is an internal medicine physician with expertise in population health, medical humanities educational interventions, and working with vulnerable populations in urban settings. She trained at Brown University's Program in Liberal Medical Education (AB Comp Lit/French, MD) and completed residency/chief residency in internal medicine at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in 2000. She has worked with vulnerable populations in ambulatory and mobile settings as a primary care GMC attending and medical outreach physician, as well as completing a Masters' and fellowship in clinical research at UCSF's Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology and SFGH DGIM, where she evaluated electronic referrals to subspecialty clinics from safety settings (Kim, Chen et al, JGIM 2009.) Since 2020, she has worked with the SF and Santa Clara County public health departments to help reduce mortality and improve C-19 and mpox mitigation, especially at residential congregate facilities through better ventilation, public-private collaboration, and addressing determinants of health for essential workers; she has summarized lessons learned from international conferences on COVID19 responses (Sales, Kim et al, AJPH 2021). Since 2013, she has facilitated art gallery-based workshops for physicians and learners to improve observation and communication skills. She co-leads narrative medicine and oncology workshops for medicine residents and students (Edwards, Kim et al, BMJ Educ 2022) and is an adjunct clinical associate professor in Primary care and population health, Medicine.

  • Youn H Kim, MD

    Youn H Kim, MD

    The Joanne and Peter Haas, Jr., Professor for Cutaneous Lymphoma Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research in cutaneous lymphomas, especially, mycosis fungoides; studies of prognostic factors, long-term survival results, and effects of therapies. Collaborative research with Departments of Pathology and Oncology in basic mechanisms of cutaneous lymphomas. Clinical trials of new investigative therapies for various dermatologic conditions or clinical trials of known therapies for new indications.

  • Abby C. King

    Abby C. King

    David and Susan Heckerman Professor and Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health and of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests include applications of behavioral theory and social ecological approaches to achieve large scale changes impacting chronic disease prevention and control; expanding the reach and translation of evidence-based interventions through state-of-the-art technologies; exploring social and physical environmental influences on health; applying community participatory research perspectives to address health disparities; and policy-level approaches to health promotion/disease prevention.

  • David Kinitz

    David Kinitz

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Nephrology

    BioDavid J. Kinitz, PhD, MSW is a social and behavioural health scientist and social worker with a passion for understanding the complex social, political, and economic systems that shape LGBTQ+ mental health and wellbeing. David holds a PhD in Social and Behavioural Health Sciences from the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, and graduate and undergraduate degrees in social work from York University and Lakehead University, respectively. His work primarily draws on critical qualitative and mixed-methods methodologies to deconstruct systems of oppression, such as racism, cissexism, heterosexism, and classism. He looks at how these systems reinforce social hierarchies that produce ill-health, particularly as they relate to labour market phenomena. David’s doctoral research employed narrative inquiry and Marxist political economy theories to study economic insecurity, precarious employment, and mental health among gay, bisexual, and queer men in Toronto, Canada. David continues this area of scholarship through leading and collaborating on various projects exploring access to social assistance, employment quality, employment skills and training, and economic insecurity among LGBTQ+ people in Canada and the US.