School of Medicine


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  • Norman J. Lacayo, MD

    Norman J. Lacayo, MD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology and Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPediatric Hematology/Oncology, Phase I drug studies for refractory and relapsed leukemia; genomic studies, biologic risk-stratification and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia; prediction or induction response and risk of relapse using phosphoproteomics in childhood AML; novel MRD techniques in childhood ALL.

  • Ronald Levy, MD

    Ronald Levy, MD

    Robert K. and Helen K. Summy Professor in the School of Medicine
    On Partial Leave from 05/16/2024 To 05/15/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Interests: lymphoma. Research Interests: Immunology and molecular biology of lymphoid malignancy; molecular vaccines for cancer.

  • Michael Link

    Michael Link

    Lydia J. Lee Professor of Pediatric Cancer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHematology/Oncology, treatment of sarcomas of bone and soft tissue, biology of acute lymphoblastic leukemias, treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease.

  • Sydney X. Lu

    Sydney X. Lu

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology)

    BioSydney Lu is a hematologist and medical oncologist in the Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, studying novel therapeutics for challenging cancers and immune disorders.
    Sydney's research career started with graduate studies in the laboratory of Dr. Marcel van den Brink at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) studying the biology of pathologic donor T cells during graft-versus-host-disease and beneficial T cells mediating graft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic bone marrow transplant, as well as the role of the thymus in regenerating healthy and protective donor-derived T cells post-transplant.
    The direct relevance of these cellular therapies and their immediate translational applicability to patients inspired him to attend medical school at Stanford and further training in hematology and medical oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering. There, as a fellow and junior faculty member, he studied disordered RNA splicing in cancer in the laboratory of Dr. Omar Abdel-Wahab, with the goal of developing novel drugs targeting RNA splicing. This work has led to observations that targeted degradation of the RNA binding protein RBM39 may be a feasible therapeutic for the treatment of myeloid cancers bearing RNA splicing factor mutations and that pharmacologic RNA splicing inhibition can generate MHC I-presented peptide neoantigens which are exploitable for immunotherapy in model systems.

    Sydney's laboratory is broadly interested in studying RNA processing and splicing in the contexts of:
    1) normal and pathologic immunity and immunotherapy
    2) cancer biology
    3) normal and malignant hematopoiesis