School of Medicine


Showing 1-4 of 4 Results

  • Lawrence Leung

    Lawrence Leung

    Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur long term interest is to have a better understanding of the natural antithrombotic pathways and the pathophysiology of vascular thrombosis. We have focused on thrombin, the key enzyme in the blood clotting cascade.Our goal is to develop new antithrombotic agents and devise new diagnostic tests for vascular thrombotic disorders.

  • Lee Levitt

    Lee Levitt

    Professor of Medicine (Hematology) at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLow molecular-weight heparins Clinical trials with anti-thrombotics Clinical trials in patients with leukemia, breast cancer and myeloma Medical education.

  • Michaela Liedtke

    Michaela Liedtke

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Hematology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) Design of phase I/II trials for the treatment of Multiple Myeloma and Amyloidosis

    2) Conduct of clinical trials to improve the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    3) Outcomes research using clinical databases for patients with Multiple Myeloma and Amyloidosis

    4) Characterization of the molecular mechanism of MLL-induced acute leukemia

  • Sydney X. Lu

    Sydney X. Lu

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology)

    BioSydney Lu is a hematologist and medical oncologist in the Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, studying novel therapeutics for challenging cancers and immune disorders.
    Sydney's research career started with graduate studies in the laboratory of Dr. Marcel van den Brink at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) studying the biology of pathologic donor T cells during graft-versus-host-disease and beneficial T cells mediating graft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic bone marrow transplant, as well as the role of the thymus in regenerating healthy and protective donor-derived T cells post-transplant.
    The direct relevance of these cellular therapies and their immediate translational applicability to patients inspired him to attend medical school at Stanford and further training in hematology and medical oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering. There, as a fellow and junior faculty member, he studied disordered RNA splicing in cancer in the laboratory of Dr. Omar Abdel-Wahab, with the goal of developing novel drugs targeting RNA splicing. This work has led to observations that targeted degradation of the RNA binding protein RBM39 may be a feasible therapeutic for the treatment of myeloid cancers bearing RNA splicing factor mutations and that pharmacologic RNA splicing inhibition can generate MHC I-presented peptide neoantigens which are exploitable for immunotherapy in model systems.

    Sydney's laboratory is broadly interested in studying RNA processing and splicing in the contexts of:
    1) normal and pathologic immunity and immunotherapy
    2) cancer biology
    3) normal and malignant hematopoiesis