School of Medicine


Showing 41-53 of 53 Results

  • Dr. Michael T. Longaker

    Dr. Michael T. Longaker

    Deane P. and Louise Mitchell Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have six main areas of current interest: 1) Cranial Suture Developmental Biology, 2) Distraction Osteogenesis, 3) Fibroblast heterogeneity and fibrosis repair, 4) Scarless Fetal Wound Healing, 5) Skeletal Stem Cells, 6) Novel Gene and Stem Cell Therapeutic Approaches.

  • Billy W Loo, Jr, MD PhD FASTRO FACR

    Billy W Loo, Jr, MD PhD FASTRO FACR

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical specialty is radiation treatment of thoracic cancers.

    My research is on developing next-generation ultra-rapid radiation therapy technology (PHASER) and studying the radiobiological effects of FLASH treatment.

    My clinical research is on advanced 4-D image-guided radiation therapy and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), and functional and metabolic imaging and imaging biomarkers.

  • Karl Lorenz

    Karl Lorenz

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    BioDr. Karl Lorenz, MD MSHS is a general internal medicine and palliative care physician, and Section chief of the VA Palo Alto-Stanford Palliative Care Program. Formerly at the VA Greater Los Angeles, Dr. Lorenz directed palliative care research at the VA Center for Innovation to Implementation and served on the faculty at the UCLA School of Medicine. Dr. Lorenz is a member of the VA’s national Hospice and Palliative Care Program (HPC) leadership team, director of the operational palliative care Quality Improvement Resource Center (QuIRC), and adjunct facility staff member at RAND. Dr. Lorenz’s work and leadership has been influential to the field of palliative care research. Under Dr. Lorenz’s leadership, since 2009 the Quality Improvement Resource Center (QuIRC) has served as one of three national leadership Centers responsible for strategic and operational support of the VA’s national hospice and palliative care programs. QuIRC develops and implements provider facing electronic tools for the VA’s national electronic medical record to improve the quality of palliative care. In that role, Dr. Lorenz participates with the national leadership team in strategic planning, policy development, and providing resources to support operational efforts. Dr. Lorenz has contributed to the field of global palliative care, serving the World Health Organization in its development of Palliative Care for Older People and leading methods for Palliative Care Essential Medications.

  • Kate Lorig

    Kate Lorig

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCommunity based psycoeducational intervention studies of disease self management for people with chronic diseases. arthritis, lung diseases, heart disease AIDs, low back pain and diabetes. Programs and studies in Spanish and English. Interventions are in small groups, mailed or on the Internet.

  • Anson Lowe

    Anson Lowe

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe laboratory is focused on the relationship between injury, wound healing, and cancer. Esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic cancers are a focus. We are particularly interested in the regulation of cell signaling by EGFR, the EGF receptor. In addition to cancer pathogenesis, active projects include the development of new diagnostic assays and drugs.

  • Robert Lowsky

    Robert Lowsky

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Lowsky's research is focused on understanding the role of regulatory T cells in the prevention of GVHD and in promoting immune tolerance following organ transplantation.

  • Bingwei Lu

    Bingwei Lu

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in understanding how neural stem cells balance their self-renewal and differentiation and how deregulation of this process can result in brain tumor. We are also interested in mechanisms of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. We are using both Drosophila and mammalian models to address these fundamental questions.

  • Sydney X. Lu

    Sydney X. Lu

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology)

    BioSydney Lu is a hematologist and medical oncologist in the Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, studying novel therapeutics for challenging cancers and immune disorders.
    Sydney's research career started with graduate studies in the laboratory of Dr. Marcel van den Brink at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) studying the biology of pathologic donor T cells during graft-versus-host-disease and beneficial T cells mediating graft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic bone marrow transplant, as well as the role of the thymus in regenerating healthy and protective donor-derived T cells post-transplant.
    The direct relevance of these cellular therapies and their immediate translational applicability to patients inspired him to attend medical school at Stanford and further training in hematology and medical oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering. There, as a fellow and junior faculty member, he studied disordered RNA splicing in cancer in the laboratory of Dr. Omar Abdel-Wahab, with the goal of developing novel drugs targeting RNA splicing. This work has led to observations that targeted degradation of the RNA binding protein RBM39 may be a feasible therapeutic for the treatment of myeloid cancers bearing RNA splicing factor mutations and that pharmacologic RNA splicing inhibition can generate MHC I-presented peptide neoantigens which are exploitable for immunotherapy in model systems.

    Sydney's laboratory is broadly interested in studying RNA processing and splicing in the contexts of:
    1) normal and pathologic immunity and immunotherapy
    2) cancer biology
    3) normal and malignant hematopoiesis

  • Ying Lu

    Ying Lu

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiostatistics, clinical trials, statistical evaluation of medical diagnostic tests, radiology, osteoporosis, meta-analysis, medical decision making

  • Natalie Shaubie Lui

    Natalie Shaubie Lui

    Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Thoracic Surgery)

    BioDr. Lui studied physics as an undergraduate at Harvard before attending medical school at Johns Hopkins. She completed a general surgery residency at the University of California San Francisco, which included two years of research in the UCSF Thoracic Oncology Laboratory and completion of a Master in Advanced Studies in clinical research. Dr. Lui went on to hold a fellowship in Thoracic Surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital, during which she participated in visiting rotations at Memorial Sloan Kettering and the Mayo Clinic.

    Dr. Lui’s surgical practice consists of general thoracic surgery with a focus on thoracic oncology and robotic thoracic surgery. Her research interests include intraoperative molecular imaging for lung cancer localization, increasing rates of lung cancer screening, and using artificial intelligence to predict lung cancer recurrence. She is the recipient of the Donald B. Doty Educational Award in 2019 from the Western Thoracic Surgical Association, the Dwight C. McGoon Award for teaching from the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association in 2020, and the Carolyn E. Reed Traveling Fellowship from the Thoracic Surgery Foundation and Women in Thoracic Surgery in 2022.

  • Matthew Lungren

    Matthew Lungren

    Adjunct Professor, Biomedical Data Science

    BioDr. Lungren is Chief Data Science Officer for Microsoft Health & Life Sciences where he focuses on translating cutting edge technology, including generative AI and cloud services, into innovative healthcare applications. As a physician and clinical machine learning researcher, he maintains a part-time clinical practice at UCSF while also continuing his research and teaching roles as adjunct professor at Stanford University.

    Prior to joining Microsoft, Dr Lungren was a clinical interventional radiologist and research faculty at Stanford University Medical School where he led the Stanford Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine and Imaging (AIMI). He later served as Principal for Clinical AI/ML at Amazon Web Services in World Wide Public Sector Healthcare, focusing on business development for clinical machine learning technologies in the public cloud.

    His scientific work has led to more than 150 publications, including work on multi-modal data fusion models for healthcare applications, new computer vision and natural language processing approaches for healthcare specific domains, opportunistic screening with machine learning for public health applications, open medical data as public good, prospective clinical trials for clinical AI translation, and application of generative AI in healthcare. He has served as advisor for early stage startups and large fortune-500 companies on healthcare AI technology development and go-to-market strategy. Dr. Lungren's work has been featured in national news outlets such as NPR, Vice News, Scientific American, and he regularly speaks at national and international scientific meetings on the topic of AI in healthcare.

    Dr. Lungren is also a top rated instructor on Coursera where his AI in Healthcare course designed especially for learners with non-technical backgrounds has been completed by more than 20k students around the world - enrollment is open now: https://www.coursera.org/learn/fundamental-machine-learning-healthcare

  • Liqun Luo

    Liqun Luo

    Ann and Bill Swindells Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study how neurons are organized into specialized circuits to perform specific functions and how these circuits are assembled during development. We have developed molecular-genetic and viral tools, and are combining them with transcriptomic, proteomic, physiological, and behavioral approaches to study these problems. Topics include: 1) assembly of the fly olfactory circuit; 2) assembly of neural circuits in the mouse brain; 3) organization and function of neural circuits; 4) Tool development.