School of Medicine


Showing 51-60 of 60 Results

  • Kyle Loh

    Kyle Loh

    Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology (Stem Cell)

    BioHow the richly varied cell-types in the human body arise from one embryonic cell is a biological marvel and mystery. We have mapped how human embryonic stem cells develop into over twenty different human cell-types. This roadmap allowed us to generate enriched populations of human liver, bone, heart and blood vessel precursors in a Petri dish from embryonic stem cells. Each of these tissue precursors could regenerate their cognate tissue upon injection into respective mouse models, with relevance to regenerative medicine. In addition to our interests in developmental and stem cell biology, we also interested in discovering the entry receptors and target cells of deadly biosafety level 4 viruses, together with our collaborators.

    Kyle attended the County College of Morris and Rutgers University, and received his Ph.D. from Stanford University (working with Irving Weissman), with fellowships from the Hertz Foundation, National Science Foundation and Davidson Institute of Talent Development. He then continued as a Siebel Investigator, and later, as an Assistant Professor and The Anthony DiGenova Endowed Faculty Scholar at Stanford, where he is jointly appointed in the Department of Developmental Biology and Institute for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine. Kyle is a Packard Fellow, Pew Scholar, Human Frontier Science Program Young Investigator and Baxter Foundation Faculty Scholar, and his research has been recognized by the NIH Director's Early Independence Award, Forbes 30 Under 30, Harold Weintraub Graduate Award, Hertz Foundation Thesis Prize and A*STAR Investigatorship.

  • Adrienne H. Long, MD, PhD

    Adrienne H. Long, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioAdrienne H. Long, MD, PhD is an instructor in the Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. Dr. Long attend Northwestern University, where she earned both her BS in biomedical engineering and her MD. Determined to help develop novel treatments for pediatric cancer patients, she took time during medical school to pursue a PhD at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), where she helped advance CAR T cell therapies with Dr. Crystal Mackall. Her influential thesis work was the first to identify T cell exhaustion as a critical factor limiting efficacy of CAR therapies (Long et al., Nature Medicine, 2015), and also identified novel methods to enhance CAR therapies for pediatric solid tumor patients (Long/Highfill et al., Cancer Immunology Research, 2016). Dr. Long went on to complete her pediatrics residency training at Boston Children’s Hospital, where she continued her research in cancer immunology with Dr. Nicholas Haining – this time focusing on strategies to enhance antigen presentation to augment checkpoint blockade (Long et al. Keystone Symposium on Cancer Immunotherapy, 2019). She completed her pediatric oncology fellowship at Stanford, and remains dedicated to a career as a physician-scientist focused on developing novel immunotherapies for children with cancer. She is currently conducting her post-doctoral research with Dr. Mark Davis, studying how thymic selection, designed to prevent auto-immunity, may also inhibit antitumor immunity in children.

  • Jonathan Z. Long

    Jonathan Z. Long

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    BioDr. Jonathan Long is an Assistant Professor of Pathology and an Institute Scholar of Stanford ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). Prior to arriving to Stanford in 2018, Dr. Long completed his Ph.D. in Chemistry at Scripps Research with Benjamin F. Cravatt and his postdoctoral work at Harvard Medical School/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute with Bruce M. Spiegelman. His contributions in the areas of lipid biochemistry and energy homeostasis have been recognized by numerous awards from the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association. At Stanford, the Long laboratory studies signaling pathways in mammalian energy metabolism. The long-term goal of this work is to discover new molecules and pathways that can be translated into therapeutic opportunities for obesity, metabolic disease, and other age-associated chronic diseases.

  • Dr. Michael T. Longaker

    Dr. Michael T. Longaker

    Deane P. and Louise Mitchell Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have six main areas of current interest: 1) Cranial Suture Developmental Biology, 2) Distraction Osteogenesis, 3) Fibroblast heterogeneity and fibrosis repair, 4) Scarless Fetal Wound Healing, 5) Skeletal Stem Cells, 6) Novel Gene and Stem Cell Therapeutic Approaches.

  • Billy W Loo, Jr, MD PhD FASTRO FACR

    Billy W Loo, Jr, MD PhD FASTRO FACR

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical specialty is radiation treatment of thoracic cancers.

    My research is on developing next-generation ultra-rapid radiation therapy technology (PHASER) and studying the radiobiological effects of FLASH treatment.

    My clinical research is on advanced 4-D image-guided radiation therapy and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), and functional and metabolic imaging and imaging biomarkers.

  • Alarice Cheng-Yi Lowe

    Alarice Cheng-Yi Lowe

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    BioDr. Lowe joined the School of Medicine faculty in 2019. She received her undergraduate degree in Biology from MIT and her medical degree at UCSD, prior to residency and cytology fellowship at UCLA. In 2011, she joined the faculty at Brigham and Women's Hospital where she developed a research focus on Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) and the application of new technology to improve clinical and molecular diagnostics. Clinically, her interests focus on Cytopathology and Genitourinary Pathology.

  • Sydney X. Lu

    Sydney X. Lu

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology)

    BioSydney Lu is a hematologist and medical oncologist in the Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, studying novel therapeutics for challenging cancers and immune disorders.
    Sydney's research career started with graduate studies in the laboratory of Dr. Marcel van den Brink at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) studying the biology of pathologic donor T cells during graft-versus-host-disease and beneficial T cells mediating graft-versus-tumor effects after allogeneic bone marrow transplant, as well as the role of the thymus in regenerating healthy and protective donor-derived T cells post-transplant.
    The direct relevance of these cellular therapies and their immediate translational applicability to patients inspired him to attend medical school at Stanford and further training in hematology and medical oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering. There, as a fellow and junior faculty member, he studied disordered RNA splicing in cancer in the laboratory of Dr. Omar Abdel-Wahab, with the goal of developing novel drugs targeting RNA splicing. This work has led to observations that targeted degradation of the RNA binding protein RBM39 may be a feasible therapeutic for the treatment of myeloid cancers bearing RNA splicing factor mutations and that pharmacologic RNA splicing inhibition can generate MHC I-presented peptide neoantigens which are exploitable for immunotherapy in model systems.

    Sydney's laboratory is broadly interested in studying RNA processing and splicing in the contexts of:
    1) normal and pathologic immunity and immunotherapy
    2) cancer biology
    3) normal and malignant hematopoiesis

  • Stephen Luby

    Stephen Luby

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute and the Freeman Spogli Institute and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Luby’s research interests include identifying and interrupting pathways of infectious disease transmission in low income countries.

  • Angela K. Lumba-Brown

    Angela K. Lumba-Brown

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery
    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research includes evidence-based guidelines for the management and treatment of traumatic brain injury, research establishing an evidence and targeting treatments for the subtypes of concussion, research identifying the best outcomes in pre-hospital care of patients with traumatic brain injury, research on brain performance via sensorimotor and sensory-cognitive synchronization, and research on dynamic visual synchronization as a biomarker for attentional impairments.

  • Deirdre J. Lyell, M.D.

    Deirdre J. Lyell, M.D.

    Dunlevie Endowed Professor of Maternal-Fetal Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPreterm labor prevention and management, preeclampsia prevention and treatment, short and long-term impact of surgical techniques at cesarean, depression during pregnancy, fetal heart rate monitoring and long-term neurologic outcome, randomized clinical trials.