School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 38 Results

  • David T. Paik

    David T. Paik

    Instructor, Cardiovascular Institute

    BioDr. David Paik is an instructor at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. At Stanford, his focus is to utilize single-cell omics to elucidate patient-specific mechanisms of various cardiovascular diseases, characterize embryonic heart development, and optimize differentiation of iPSCs to subtypes of cardiovascular cells. Dr. Paik received his BA in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Boston University (2010) and PhD in Cell and Developmental Biology at Vanderbilt University (2015). During his PhD training, Dr. Paik investigated the endogenous cardiac repair mechanisms in the adult heart following ischemic injury such as myocardial infarction, with focus on the role of Wnt signaling pathway on coronary vessel formation and plasticity of endothelial cells during cardiac tissue repair. At this time Dr. Paik completed HHMI/VUMC Certificate Program in Molecular Medicine, where he was supervised by his clinical mentor Dr. Douglas Sawyer to interact with congestive heart failure patients and to bridge clinical sciences with basic and translational cardiovascular research. Since 2016 he has been mentored by Dr. Joseph Wu at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. Dr. Paik is currently supported by the NIH NHLBI K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Award.

  • Latha Palaniappan, MD, MS

    Latha Palaniappan, MD, MS

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Palaniappan has published over 200 peer reviewed manuscripts, abstracts, and book chapters over the last 20 years in the areas of chronic disease prevention and treatment in diverse populations. She has expertise in epidemiological research using big data, use of electronic health records for research, and clinical trials.

  • Alan C. Pao

    Alan C. Pao

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and, by courtesy, of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are broadly interested in how the kidneys control salt, water, and electrolyte homeostasis in the body. Our disease focus is on kidney stone disease. We use cultured kidney cells, transgenic mice, human plasma/urine samples, and electronic health record data to study the pathogenesis of kidney stone disease. Our therapeutic focus is on the development of small molecule compounds that can be used for kidney stone prevention.

  • Vedant Pargaonkar

    Vedant Pargaonkar

    Member (Staff), Cardiovascular Institute

    BioMy long-term research interests involve development of algorithms using computational methods for early detection of coronary pathophysiology including, endothelial dysfunction and microvascular dysfunction (MVD) and/or a myocardial bridge (MB) in patients with angina and no obstructive coronary artery disease (NOCAD) and the identification of novel target therapies for primary prevention and improved prognosis in these patients. Under the mentorship of Dr. Jennifer Tremmel in Cardiovascular medicine at Stanford, I have been systematically studying to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of these patients, as well as the optimal use of diagnostic testing and treatment using the angina and no-obstructive CAD Registry at Stanford. In collaboration with other investigators in this field, we have published multiple scientific articles highlighting the limitations of current testing in this population and identification of novel diagnostic tools for early diagnosis and management of patients with angina and no obstructive CAD. My research also focuses on myocardial infarction (MI) in women, particularly spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD). I have been involved in the design and execution of the first international collaborative study in SCAD, investigating peripartum vs. non-peripartum SCAD. This is analyzing the largest cohort of patients recruited from multiple US and non-US sites to understand the pathophysiological differences in these patient cohorts.

  • Victoria Parikh

    Victoria Parikh

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioDr. Parikh is cardiologist specializing in the care of patients with inherited cardiovascular diseases. She completed clinical cardiology fellowship at Stanford School of Medicine and her medical residency at the University of California, San Francisco. Funded by research grant from the NIH, she currently studies multiple causes of cardiomyopathy in the laboratory. She has a particular clinical and scientific interest in inherited arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies, which are an increasingly recognized disease entity. Dr. Parikh is currently using patient cohort genetics, high throughput molecular biology and human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes to study variant pathogenicity in this disease.

  • Dr. Seung-min Park

    Dr. Seung-min Park

    Instructor, Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy educational background and training have focused on creating micro- and nano-scale devices using newly-developed techniques and applying these processes to advance research in molecular/cellular biology. So far, my area of expertise has focused on developing methods to pattern, sort, and analyze biological materials, especially circulating tumor cells. Through my work I have created multiple Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) and Nanoelectromechanical System (NEMS) devices that can not only identify miniscule mass changes in microfluidics, but integrate mass spectrometry for molecular detection, and manipulate oligonucleotide species for sort and analysis. I am confident that my background provides the expertise in the design and fabrication of micro-/nano-scale functional modules necessary for developing next-generation devices in solving critical problems in biomedical engineering.