School of Medicine


Showing 21-40 of 72 Results

  • Meeta Raman Patel

    Meeta Raman Patel

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    BioDr. Patel has been working with children with autism and other disabilities for over 20 years. She is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. Dr. Patel received a BS degree from the University of California at Davis in 1996 in Psychology with an emphasis in Biology. She continued her graduate training in Psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Patel received her PhD in Psychology with an emphasis in Behavior Analysis.

    She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 2001. Dr. Patel joined the faculty at the Marcus and Kennedy Krieger Institutes in 2001 and Emory University School of Medicine in 2002. Dr. Patel was a case manager in the Pediatric Feeding Disorders and Early Intervention Programs at the Marcus and Kennedy Krieger Institutes from 2001-2003. In 2003, she started Clinic 4 Kidz, which is a home-based Interdisciplinary Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program. Currently, she serves as the Executive Director of Clinic 4 Kidz.

    Her research and clinical interests focus on treating feeding problems in children who have underlying medical issues (e.g., prematurity, failure to thrive [FTT], tube dependence, gastroesophageal reflux [GER], food allergies, etc.). In addition, she has expertise in working with children with autism, more specifically treating food selectivity by type and/or texture.

    She currently serves on the editorial board of Behavioral Development which is a journal of the American Psychological Association. She formerly served on the editorial boards for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Education and Treatment of Children. Dr. Patel also serves as a guest reviewer for several journals. She has published over 20 research studies in peer-reviewed journals and has authored two invited book chapters. Dr. Patel has also been invited to present at numerous conferences and at various hospitals all over the country.

  • Meghna D Patel

    Meghna D Patel

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current academic focus is in chronic heart failure and ventricular assist device.

  • Ruby Vishnu Patel

    Ruby Vishnu Patel

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Nephrology

    BioI am a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Pediatric Nephrology at Stanford. I have completed my pediatric nephrology fellowship from Stanford Children's Hospital and Residency as well as Chief Resident Year from The Kaiser Permanente Northern California Pediatrics Residency Program.

  • Andrea Pedroza Tobias

    Andrea Pedroza Tobias

    Postdoctoral Scholar, General Pediatrics

    BioDr. Andrea Pedroza is a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford Impact Labs and the Department of Pediatrics in the Partnerships for Research in Child Health Lab. She earned a Ph.D. in Global Health from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and a Master of Science in Nutrition from the National Institute of Public Health in Mexico (INSP). Her research focuses on generating evidence for interventions and policy recommendations aimed at improving the dietary quality of children to impact their health and development. Currently, she is employing a community-engaged approach to design nutrition interventions and policy recommendations that aim to reduce the consumption of ultra-processed foods among low-income children to narrow the gap in health disparities.

  • Jack Percelay

    Jack Percelay

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics

    BioJack Percelay has a 25+ year career in pediatric hospital medicine, beginning before the term hospitalist was invented when he started as an "in-house pediatrician in 1991 at several Bay Area hospitals after a brief career as a civilian primary care pediatrician at local and international US military bases. He has spent the majority of his career in community hospitals where his practice has run the gamut from the general pediatric ward and emergency room, to the PICU and intensive care nurseries, delivery room, and specialized neurologic and neurosurgical units. His work has taken him from San Francisco to New York City with brief stints in Hawaii. In 2015 he moved to Seattle Children's Hospital where he was an Associate Division Chief of Hospital Medicine, and in 2018 returned to the Bay Area joining the Stanford faculty.

    He served as the founding chair of the AAP Section on Hospital Medicine, and has also served as the Chair of the AAP Committee on Hospital Care. He served for seven years as the pediatric board member for the Society of Hospital Medicine and has been recognized as a Master of Hospital Medicine by SHM. Additionally, he was an inaugural board member of the American Board of Pediatrics Pediatric Hospital Medicine Subspecialty Board. Areas of interest include pediatric hospital medicine systems of care, patient and family-centered care, BRUEs, billing and coding, and hospitalist roles in the PICU.

  • Martin Pfaller

    Martin Pfaller

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    BioMartin R. Pfaller is an Instructor in the Department of Pediatrics (Cardiology) in the group of Alison L. Marsden. He received his B.Sc., M.Sc., and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the Technical University of Munich, working with Wolfgang A. Wall. During his Ph.D., he validated an efficient yet physiologically accurate boundary condition to account for the mechanical support of the heart within its surroundings, which has been adopted by various research groups worldwide. He further demonstrated how projection-based model order reduction could speed up model personalization from patient data, such as magnetic resonance imaging or blood pressure measurements. His current work focuses on cardiovascular fluid dynamics. He developed reduced-physics models to make blood flow simulations faster and more reliable. Further, he developed a fluid-solid-growth interaction model in blood vessels. His future research will predict the heart’s long-term function in heart diseases, supported by an NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) and Stanford MCHRI Instructor K Award Support. He will quantify the risk of heart failure after a heart attack with a stability analysis validated with imaging data in swine and humans. This research will improve our understanding of biomechanical mechanisms leading to heart failure and help to identify patients at risk, enable personalized therapies, and facilitate the optimal design of medical devices. As an Assistant Professor, Martin will start his research group at Yale University in the Department of Biomedical Engineering in July 2024.

  • Trung Hoang Minh Pham

    Trung Hoang Minh Pham

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUncovering mechanisms of tissue immunity and immunophysiology during persistent infection

    The immune system safeguards the health of complex organisms by rapidly eliminating invading pathogens, curbing infection-induced tissue disruptions, and maintaining tissue homeostasis. Many bacterial pathogens evade host antimicrobial mechanisms and persist in infected tissues at low levels for long periods of time even in the presence of innate and adaptive immune resistance. During persistent infection, the immune system simultaneously orchestrates antimicrobial responses to contain the pathogen, repairs damaged tissue, regulates nutrient resources, and maintains other tissue physiologic functions to ensure host survival. Failure of any of these tasks leads to uncontrolled infection, devastating disease, and even death. The goals of our research are to understand:

    1)What are the innate and adaptive immune cellular mechanisms that contain pathogens during persistent infection?
    2)How are tissue physiological functions, such as tissue repair and nutrient regulation, maintained during persistent infection?
    3)How do pathogens survive innate and adaptive antimicrobial mechanisms in infected tissues?
    4)How does persistent infection impact host immunity to secondary infections of a similar or different pathogen?

    Through investigating these fundamental questions, we may be able to decode the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms that can be harnessed to eradicate infections and help restore health after an infectious insult. We employ animal infection models and bring together immunology, tissue biology, microbiology, and genetics to uncover the mechanisms of tissue immunity and immunophysiology during persistent infection from the molecular to organismal level.

    Current areas of research:
    •Development, maintenance, and plasticity of macrophage functional diversity in infected tissue
    •Tissue repair and nutrient regulation during persistent infection
    •Cellular dynamics and bacterial persistence in lymphoid organs

    We are looking for highly motivated team members who are passionate about making impactful scientific discoveries to join our group at all levels. For opportunities and positions available for pre-doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows, please contact tpham8@stanford.edu!