School of Medicine


Showing 571-580 of 620 Results

  • Lance Prince

    Lance Prince

    Philip Sunshine, MD, Professor of Neonatology

    BioLawrence (Lance) S. Prince, MD, PhD, is the Division Chief for Neonatal and Developmental Medicine at Stanford School of Medicine. Dr. Prince was previously a Professor of Pediatrics and Chief of the Division of Neonatology at the University of California, San Diego and Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego.

    Dr. Prince has a long and distinguished career mentoring clinical and scientific trainees and students, many of whom have gone on to establish their own successful careers as academic physician investigators. As a physician scientist, Dr. Prince leads a basic science laboratory focusing on the mechanisms regulating developmental immunology and lung injury and repair. Dr. Prince received a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from University of Miami, an MD/PhD with a focus in Cell Biology from University of Alabama at Birmingham, and postdoctoral fellowship, Pediatrics residency, and Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship training at the University of Iowa. Before arriving in California, Dr. Prince was an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University.

    Dr. Prince’s research interests include the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling lung development and the maturation of the fetal and neonatal immune systems. He has a particular clinical interest in managing and treating neonatal lung diseases, especially bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in babies born extremely preterm. Dr. Prince’s research team focuses primarily on the development of innate immunity during fetal life as it impacts health and disease in preterm infants. The laboratory is investigating how microbes including Group B streptococcus exploit the unique features of neonatal macrophages to avoid immune detection and cause disease, as well as leading a number of clinical and translational investigations.

  • John R. Pringle

    John R. Pringle

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMuch of our research exploits the power of yeast as an experimentally tractable model eukaryote to investigate fundamental problems in cell and developmental biology such as the mechanisms of cell polarization and cytokinesis. In another project, we are developing the small sea anemone Aiptasia as a model system for study of the molecular and cellular biology of dinoflagellate-cnidarian symbiosis, which is critical for the survival of most corals but still very poorly understood.

  • Jonathan Pritchard

    Jonathan Pritchard

    Bing Professor of Population Studies, Professor of Genetics and Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in a broad range of problems at the interface of genomics and evolutionary biology. One current focus of the lab is in understanding how genetic variation impacts gene regulation and complex traits. We also have long-term interests in using genetic data to learn about population structure, history and adaptation, especially in humans.

    FOR UP-TO-DATE DETAILS ON MY LAB AND RESEARCH, PLEASE SEE: http://pritchardlab.stanford.edu

  • Charles G. Prober, MD

    Charles G. Prober, MD

    Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interest is in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of infections in children. Much of this research has focused on viral infections, especially those caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV). I have conducted a number of studies concerned with the epidemiology of HSV-2 infections in pregnant women, their partners, and neonates.

  • Judith Prochaska

    Judith Prochaska

    Senior Associate Vice Provost, Clinical Research Governance and Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Prochaska's research expertise centers on technology-mediated health behavior change interventions including targets of tobacco, physical activity, and dietary change. Working with Alaska Native and Latino communities, people with serious mental illness, alcohol and drug problems, or heart disease, and jobseekers and the unhoused, Dr. Prochaska’s research combines stage-tailored interventions with pharmacotherapy and utilizes interactive expert system interventions and social media.