School of Medicine


Showing 21-40 of 52 Results

  • Andrew Rezvani, M.D.

    Andrew Rezvani, M.D.

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

  • Fauzia Riaz, M.D., M.H.S.

    Fauzia Riaz, M.D., M.H.S.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Riaz is a medical oncologist specializing in breast cancer whose research focuses on novel therapeutics and approaches cancer care delivery for patients with breast cancer. She is currently a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Riaz completed formal research training during her fellowship, through Yale University’s Advanced Health Sciences Research program. This included training in biostatistics, research methodology, and health policy, ultimately culminating in the completion of a Master of Health Sciences. As faculty, she is an active member of the Stanford Breast Oncology Clinical Research Group, and currently serves as the Stanford site principal investigator and sub-investigator for several ongoing breast cancer clinical trials.

  • Stephen Richmond

    Stephen Richmond

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Stephen Richmond (he/him/his) is a family physician, educator, and health justice advocate with specific interest in racial equity in medicine. He currently serves as a clinical assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Primary Care & Population Health (PCPH) in the Stanford Department of Medicine. He completed his A.S. at Solano Community College, B.A. in Molecular & Cell Biology at UC Berkeley, M.P.H. at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and his M.D. at David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA. He is a graduate of the UCSF-San Francisco General Hospital Family & Community Medicine Residency Program.

    As a clinician, Dr. Richmond cares for individuals of all ages with a wide range of acute and chronic illnesses. He is especially passionate about providing high quality, evidenced-based care to underserved communities of color. As a researcher and educator, his interests broadly involve the intersection of race, racism, and medicine, with current projects focused on applications of Critical Race Theory to medical education and clinical care. He currently serves as the faculty director for the REACH Health Equity Scholarly Concentration within the school of Medicine and the Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion Curriculum Lead within the PCPH Division.

    Beyond Stanford, Dr. Richmond is involved in many ongoing advocacy efforts aimed at achieving health equity through individual and structural-level change. Dr. Richmond has received multiple teaching awards for his work in the space of equity, inclusion & anti-oppression in medicine, and is a routine presenter and consultant in these areas.

  • Norman Rizk

    Norman Rizk

    Berthold and Belle N. Guggenhime Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in the prevention and control of critical care-related illnesses and complications, including ventilator-associated pneumonia, spread of nosocomial infections, and prognosis of multiple organ system failure in intensive care units. Infections and complications of therapy in immunocompromised hosts, including effects of chemotherapy and hematopoetic stem cell transplants is another interest.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Professor of Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    James W. Raitt, M.D. Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab investigates the molecular mechanisms of and develops therapies to treat autoimmune and rheumatic diseases, with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, and osteoarthritis.

    The overriding objectives of our laboratory are:
    1. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying autoimmune and rheumatic diseases.
    2. To investigate the role of innate immune inflammation in osteoarthritis.
    3. To develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics

  • Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Allan and Tina Neill Professor of Lymphatic Research and Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical research includes studies on risk factor modification in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease; clinical trials involving medical therapies for peripheral arterial insufficiency; coronary angiogenesis; therapy of lymphedema; atherand photodynamic therapy in atherosclerosis.

  • Fatima Rodriguez

    Fatima Rodriguez

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioFatima Rodriguez, MD, MPH is an Associate Professor in Cardiovascular Medicine and (by courtesy) the Stanford Prevention Research Center. Dr. Rodriguez earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School and her MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health. She then completed internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and fellowship in cardiovascular medicine at Stanford University. She currently serves as the Section Chief of Preventive Cardiology. Dr. Rodriguez specializes in cardiovascular disease prevention, inherited lipid disorders, and cardiovascular risk assessment in high-risk populations.

    Dr. Rodriguez’s research includes a range of topics around racial, ethnic, and gender disparities in cardiovascular disease prevention, developing novel interventions to address disparities, and opportunistic screening of coronary artery disease.

  • Stephan Rogalla, M.D. PhD

    Stephan Rogalla, M.D. PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe research interest of myself and my lab are in the field of early cancer detection using targeted molecular spies to highlight (pre)cancerous lesions. We as well aim to improve precision medicine in autoimmune disorders like inflammatory bowel disease and oncology.

  • Albert "A.J." Rogers, MD, MBA

    Albert "A.J." Rogers, MD, MBA

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Rogers is a board-certified, fellowship-trained cardiologist with the Cardiac Arrhythmia Service at Stanford Health Care. He is also an instructor of medicine in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    As a clinical cardiac electrophysiologist, Dr. Rogers’ training includes evaluating issues involving electrical activity in the heart and how these can lead to an abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia). His expertise includes mapping regions in the heart associated with arrhythmias and then applying a minimally invasive therapy (ablation) that targets the responsible areas causing the problem. He also performs procedures to implant cardiac devices, such as pacemakers and defibrillators, designed to synchronize heart contractions and reset irregular heartbeats.

    Dr. Rogers specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, and other arrhythmias. In collaboration with Stanford Medicine cardiovascular surgeons, he performs hybrid surgical-catheter ablation procedures as a more permanent treatment for persistent forms of atrial fibrillation and for inappropriate sinus tachycardia. During this procedure, ablation therapy is applied to areas both inside and outside of the heart responsible for the arrhythmia.

    As a physician-researcher, Dr. Rogers’ translational research applies biomedical engineering and machine learning approaches to explore the mechanisms underlying cardiac arrhythmia. These efforts include research funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Heart Association to investigate novel methods for diagnosing and treating heart rhythm disorders. Dr. Rogers has over 10 years of experience with medical technology innovation and development.

    Dr. Rogers serves as associate editor of the Journal of Invasive Cardiovascular Electrophysiology. He is also a peer reviewer for multiple prestigious journals, including Heart Rhythm, The Lancet: Digital Health, the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Clinical Electrophysiology, and Frontiers in Physiology. He has been an invited guest speaker at national and international meetings, including those for the American Heart Association and the European Cardiac Arrythmia Society.

  • Angela Rogers

    Angela Rogers

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use genetics and genomics methodologies to identify novel ARDS pathobiology; we hope that this will enable identification of novel biomarkers, phenotypes, and treatments for the disease. We are building a plasma biobank of critically ill patients at Stanford, with a particular focus on metabolic changes in critical illness.

  • Nidhi Rohatgi, MD MS

    Nidhi Rohatgi, MD MS

    Clinical Professor, Medicine
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioNidhi Rohatgi, MD, MS, SFHM is a Clinical Professor of Medicine and Section Chief for Surgical Co-management (Neurosurgery, Orthopedic surgery, and ENT) in the Division of Hospital Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. She primarily manages medical co-morbidities and strives to prevent medical complications in post-surgical patients in the hospital setting. She has led several quality improvement and clinical research studies and is passionate about finding innovative, cost-efficient and sustainable solutions in healthcare. She serves as an investigator in NIH and industry sponsored clinical trials and is the Director of Clinical Research (Palo Alto) in the Division of Hospital Medicine. She is Affiliated Faculty at the Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine and Imaging at Stanford University and Stanford Center for Digital Health. She is an invited speaker at national and international meetings and serves on several national committees. She is the recipient of local, national, and international awards for her work as a clinician, educator, and researcher. She is a strong advocate for patient experience and serves as the Medical Director for the Clinical Advice Services at Stanford Health Care.

  • Rajat Rohatgi

    Rajat Rohatgi

    Professor of Biochemistry and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Intereststhe overall goal of my laboratory is to uncover new regulatory mechanisms in signaling systems, to understand how these mechanisms are damaged in disease states, and to devise new strategies to repair their function.

  • Dana Nirel Romalis

    Dana Nirel Romalis

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDana Romalis has been a board certified Family Medicine physician since 2004. She enjoys taking care of families throughout all phases of life. Special interests include teaching, collaborative care, preventative medicine, behavioral change, and reproductive and adolescent health. Since 2017, she has been a primary care provider at the Life Connections Health Center in San Jose, caring for Cisco employees and their families.

    She was born and raised in Vancouver, Canada, where she also attended medical school at the University of British Columbia. As an undergraduate at Brandeis University, she double majored in Neuroscience and Psychology, and was captain of the women’s varsity diving team. She did her residency at Montefiore Medical Center’s Residency Program of Social Medicine in the Bronx, NY.

    Prior to joining Stanford’s primary care division in 2017, she worked for 10 years as a physician at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center on their interdisciplinary Valley Homeless Healthcare Program. She is committed to comprehensive and compassionate care for all.

    In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and 2 teenagers, reading, hiking, biking, and volunteering in her community.