School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 48 Results

  • Michael Salerno

    Michael Salerno

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) and of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging)

    BioDr. Salerno completed his BS in Biological Engineering at Cornell University, and his MD and PhD in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Virginia as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program. He then completed the American Board of Internal Medicine Research Pathway with an Internal Medicine residency at Stanford University, and his general cardiology fellowship at Duke University Medical Center. During his time at Duke he completed a dedicated year in cardiovascular MRI at the Duke Cardiovascular MR Imaging Center. He returned to UVA in 2008 to complete a 2-year advanced cardiovascular imaging fellowship where he trained in CMR and cardiovascular CTA. He achieved COCATS Level III training in all cardiovascular imaging modalities (Echo, Nuclear, CMR, CCT), and is board certified in Echocardiography and Nuclear Cardiology. He served as faculty at UVA in Cardiology, Radiology, and Biomedical Engineering from 2010-2021 where he was the Director of Cardiac MRI and the Medical Director of Echocardiography, before returning to Stanford.

    His research involves the development and evaluation of novel MRI pulse sequences and techniques to improve the clinical utility of CMR imaging. The current focus of the research is on quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging, quantitative imaging of myocardial fibrosis, rapid free-breathing and self-gated imaging, and deep learning for image reconstruction and post-processing. His laboratory includes undergraduate and graduate engineering students as well as clinical cardiovascular imaging fellows to bring new advances into clinical practice. Dr. Salerno has been in the field of MRI for 25 years and holds multiple patents related to the development and application of novel pulse sequences for MRI. He has received numerous research awards, and has published extensively in the areas of MRI, cardiovascular MRI and multi-modality cardiovascular imaging. His research has been supported by the AHA and the National Institutes of health. He is a deputy editor for JACC Cardiovascular Imaging.

    Outside of work, Dr. Salerno enjoys sailing, rock climbing, skiing, running, biking, hiking, and spending time with his wife Cherie, and his two boys Christopher and Joseph.

  • Karim Sallam, MD

    Karim Sallam, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioKarim Sallam, MD, is trained in Cardiovascular Medicine and Advanced Heart Failure.

  • Darren Salmi

    Darren Salmi

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiovascular pathology, congenital heart disease, autopsy, medical education

  • Jacinda Sampson

    Jacinda Sampson

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Jacinda Sampson received her MD and a PhD in biochemistry from University of Alabama at Birmingham, and completed her neurology residency and neurogenetics fellowship at the University of Utah. She served at Columbia University Medical Center prior to joining Stanford University Medical Center in 2015. Her areas of interest include myotonic dystrophies, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and neurogenetic disorders such as neurofibromatosis, hereditary spastic paraparesis, spinocerebellar ataxia, among others. She is interested in clinical trials for treatment of neurogenetic disorders, and is the clinical application of next-generation genomic sequencing to genetic testing.

  • Nazish Sayed MD, PhD

    Nazish Sayed MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Surgery (Vascular Surgery) and at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Sayed Laboratory is focused on the development of novel technologies that drive innovation in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug testing in vascular biology. The lab conducts translational research in vascular biology and aims to understand the role of the vasculature in the development of cardiac diseases, including those due to inherited genetic variants or environmental insults such as type 2 diabetes or hypertension. The lab employs the human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to generate patient-specific vascular cells (endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells) as an alternative to animal models providing a human tissue surrogate for research that is scalable and sustainable. By employing this unique platform, the lab also investigates the role of chemotherapeutic agents (anti-cancer drugs) on the vasculature. Dr. Sayed’s lab has also established an endothelial regeneration program, where they leverage the innate immune system to regenerate endothelial cells from human fibroblasts.

    Work from the lab has led to seminal discoveries in the areas of 1) Nitric oxide (NO) biology, (2) vascular biology, (3) stem cell biology, (4) cardiovascular disease modeling (5) cardio-oncology.