School of Medicine


Showing 1-25 of 25 Results

  • Theadora Sakata

    Theadora Sakata

    Postdoctoral Scholar, General Internal Medicine

    BioStanford-Intermountain Fellow in Population Health and Health Services Research

  • Melissa Salm

    Melissa Salm

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGlobal health, medical anthropology, and biosecurity with a focus on the One Health approach to infectious disease epidemiology, viral discovery and risk characterization of pandemic potential pathogens, global health governance, and transdisciplinary approaches to public health innovation

  • Pablo Amador Sanchez

    Pablo Amador Sanchez

    Postdoctoral Medical Fellow, Cardiovascular Medicine
    Fellow in Medicine

    BioDr. Pablo Sanchez is post doctoral medical fellow at Stanford University. He earned a degree in physiology at The University of Arizona and received his M.D. from The University of Arizona College of Medicine, in Tucson. He completed Internal Medicine training at Brigham & Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, and served as Chief Resident from 2018-2019. During residency, his research focused on clinical outcomes of the complex patient composition in the modern Cardiac Intensive Care Unit. He completed Cardiovascular Medicine fellowship at Stanford and served as Chief Fellow from 2021-2022. He is interested in cardio-pulmonary interactions in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Under the tutelage of Dr. Angela Rogers (Pulmonary Medicine Division) and Dr. Euan Ashley (Cardiovascular Medicine Division), he plans to integrate immune-metabolic biomarker and echocardiographic profiling to identify cardiac dysfunction in ARDS. He receives funding from the National Institutes of Health through the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA, F32) and Loan Repayment Award. He is pursuing additional fellowship training in critical care medicine.

  • Rushil Shah, MBBS, DNB, MHS

    Rushil Shah, MBBS, DNB, MHS

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioRushil Shah, MBBS, DNB, MHS is currently pursuing a Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California in the prestigious American Heart Association Atrial Fibrillation Strategically Focused Research Network on Shared Decision Making for Anticoagulation Stroke Prevention under the mentorship of Paul J. Wang, MD and Randall S. Stafford, MD, PhD. He is currently working on Magneto-cardiography with Dr. Sanjiv Narayan at Stanford

    Rushil recently completed another three-year long Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship in Cardiac Electrophysiology at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, United States. Rushil conducted translational research centered on advancements in Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging, VT Ablation, Atrial Fibrillation, Cardiac Sarcoidosis, Cardiac Sympathetic Denervation and Hypothermia Induction in the animal experiment lab at Johns Hopkins under the supervision of Harikrishna Tandri, MD, FACC. Rushil completed his one-year training in Medical Immunology & Molecular Microbiology at the Johns Hopkins University as well.

    Rushil attended medical school at the Topiwala National Medical College & B.Y.L Nair Hospital in Mumbai, India and subsequently, completed his three-years of residency in Internal Medicine out there. Additionally, Dr. Shah has a three-year experience of working as a Hospitalist in a Cardiology Care Unit under the supervision of Yash Lokhandwala, MD, DM at Bandra HFH in Mumbai, India. Dr. Shah is a member of the American Heart Association, Dallas, TX and the Heart Rhythm Society in Washington DC. Rushil aspires to complete his cardiology training here in the United States.

  • Disha Sharma

    Disha Sharma

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioI am currently a Postdoctoral Fellow with Dr. Thomas Quertermous at Stanford University. I have joined the lab with more than 7 years of research experience in the field of computational biology wherein I have worked with multi-omics data for multiple diseases to get a deeper understanding of the disease identification and progression.
    My background in engineering and bioinformatics provide an excellent background for the studies proposed in this application, which proposes to investigate the genetics and genomics of smooth muscle cell biology in the context of vascular disease. I first pursued a Bachelor's in Biotechnology program at one of the premier institutes in India, Banasthali Vidyapeeth and received my degree in 2007. After qualifying with the IIT-JAM exam in 2010, I joined the Master’s in Science (Biotechnology) program at the prestigious Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee in a program of engineering and technology. After my Master's, I joined Dr. Vinod Scaria’s lab at CSIR-IGIB as a Project Fellow. During the tenure as Project fellow from 2012-2014, I had the opportunity to work with different transcriptomics data from model organisms including zebrafish, rat and human cell lines to understand the role of long non-coding RNAs and miRNAs. I also worked on clinical datasets of autoimmune disorders. With one and half years of research experience and a UGC fellowship awarded through the NET-JRF examination, I continued working with Dr. Vinod Scaria to pursue my PhD. My research interest for the degree focused on the identification and characterization of circular RNAs, and this work has now been published in multiple manuscripts listed below. Over the years at CSIR-IGIB, I have had the chance to work on interesting ideas with multiple collaborating groups. One of them was Dr. Sridhar Sivasubbu, with whom I worked to understand the transcript-level interactions between mitochondria and the nucleus, using zebrafish as a model organism.
    In view of my interest in the translational aspects of biology, I obtained the opportunity to work as part of the GUaRDIAN Consortium with Dr. Vinod Scaria and Dr. Sridhar Sivasubbu at CSIR-IGIB. This pioneering project is the largest network of researchers and clinicians in India pursuing sequencing patient DNAs to identify rare SNVs and structural variants responsible for muscular dystrophy in these patients. In the interest of advancing genomics in clinical and healthcare settings, I was selected as Intel Fellow 2019 to work for the Intel-IGIB collaboration focussing on “Accelerating Clinical Analysis and Interpretation of Genomic Data through advanced tools/libraries”. Our project was selected among top 3 from 50 premier research institutes and I was awarded the Intel-India Fellowship for a year to pursue this project. I was also part of the core team of IndiGen (Genomes for Public Health in India). With the spread of COVID-19 around the world, our group contributed by sequencing and analysing COVID19 genomes to get a better understanding of the disease and I had the opportunity to be part of the core team to analyse the viral sequencing datasets and viral assembly.
    I am extremely pleased to have joined the Quertermous lab at Stanford to the study of the molecular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease. Work that I am pursuing in this laboratory, and proposed in this application, are directly in line with my personal aspiration to start an independent career in the field of scientific research to work on projects with high translational value and of interest to the public health.

  • Gulshan Singh

    Gulshan Singh

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research interest is to understand the host-microbial pathways in intestinal inflammation. I am working to explore cellular heterogeneity at single immune cell level in systemic and local regions of the intestine that are associated with different Inflammatory bowel disease conditions.

  • Samyuktha Suresh

    Samyuktha Suresh

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests- Exploring the crosstalk between DNA repair mechanisms and protein arginine methyltransferases in triple-negative breast cancer
    - Understanding the role of DNA repair enzymes in the context of breast cancer