School of Medicine


Showing 1-38 of 38 Results

  • Sarada Sakamuri, MD

    Sarada Sakamuri, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Sarada Sakamuri specializes in neuromuscular medicine. Her interests are peripheral nerve injury, neuromuscular ultrasound, EMG/NCS, and neurogenetic disorders. Her other passion is graduate medical education.

    She graduated from Rutgers University with Phi Beta Kappa distinction and a degree in psychology. She attended Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, NJ, where she led multiple community service and medical education activities and was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha and Gold Humanism Honor Societies. She moved to the Bay Area to pursue neurology residency at Stanford, where she later served as chief resident. She then completed two years of fellowship in EMG/Clinical Neurophysiology and Neuromuscular Medicine and research training at Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research Center.

    Dr. Sakamuri's passion is neuromuscular medicine, with a focus on peripheral nerve traumas and disorders. She is Co-Director of the Center for Peripheral Nerve Surgery along with neurosurgeon Dr. Thomas J. Wilson. She performs advanced evaluations of peripheral nerve conditions by integrating nerve and muscle ultrasound and neurophysiologic testing (EMG/NCS) at the bedside. She has advanced training in nerve and muscle ultrasound, and sits on the Neuromuscular Ultrasound Committee of the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM).

    She is board-certified in Neurology and in Neuromuscular disorders by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN). She is certified in EMG/NCS by the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (ABEM), and holds a Certificate of Added Qualification in Neuromuscular Ultrasound.

    Dr. Sakamuri's other passion is graduate medical education. She is the Program Director of the Stanford Neuromuscular Medicine Fellowship and Associate Director of the Clinical Neurophysiology/EMG Fellowship, with a total of five ACGME-accredited positions filled by extremely bright and talented fellows. She supervises a weekly neurology resident continuity clinic and enjoys teaching medical students and neurology and physiatry residents and fellows. She been awarded the Lysia S. Forno Award for outstanding contributions to resident teaching.

  • Cynthia Harryman Samos

    Cynthia Harryman Samos

    CIRM CLIN2 Project Manager, Neurosurgery

    Current Role at StanfordProject Manager and Writer/Editor for the Department of Neurosurgery

  • Robert Sapolsky

    Robert Sapolsky

    John A. and Cynthia Fry Gunn Professor, Professor of Biology, of Neurology and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeuron death, stress, gene therapy

  • Mark J. Schnitzer

    Mark J. Schnitzer

    Professor of Biology, of Applied Physics and of Neurosurgery (Adult Neurosurgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of our research is to advance experimental paradigms for understanding normal cognitive and disease processes at the level of neural circuits, with emphasis on learning and memory processes. To advance these paradigms, we invent optical brain imaging techniques, several of which have been widely adopted. Our neuroscience studies combine these imaging innovations with behavioral, electrophysiological, optogenetic and computational methods, enabling a holistic approach to brain science.

  • Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical interests involve inpatient and outpatient care of patients with neurovascular diseases, mostly ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. I have a particular interest in cervical artery dissection, non-atherosclerotic vasculopathies, and stroke in the young.

  • Elaheh Shaghaghian, MD

    Elaheh Shaghaghian, MD

    Visiting Instructor, Neurosurgery

    BioElaheh Shaghaghian, MD, is a Clinical Research Scholar at Stanford University's Neurosurgery Department, where she investigates the efficacy of CyberKnife Radiosurgery with an interdisciplinary team. Skilled in problem-solving, Elaheh has a fervent passion for learning and applying new medical technologies.

    She earned her MD from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, focusing on advancing medical treatments through research. With experience in clinical research, data analysis, and interdisciplinary collaboration, she is dedicated to leveraging technology to enhance healthcare outcomes.

  • Mehrdad Shamloo

    Mehrdad Shamloo

    Professor (Research) of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe ultimate goal of the Shamloo laboratory is to rapidly advance our understanding of brain function at the molecular, cellular, circuit and behavioral levels, and to elucidate the pathological process underlying malfunction of the nervous system following injury and neurologic disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson’s disease, and autism. We have been focusing on the noradrenergic system and approaches leading to restoration of brain adrenergic signaling in these disorders.

  • Peter Shannon

    Peter Shannon

    Affiliate, Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education

    BioThe Irish-American conductor Peter Shannon aspires to prove to others that orchestral music can transform lives and communities. Innovative and tireless in his outreach, Shannon embodies the new and growing role of music director.

    2023/2024 is Peter Shannon s ninth year as Artistic Director and Conductor of the Jackson Symphony. From 2008 to 2019 he held the position as Artistic Director and Conductor of the Savannah Philharmonic, Georgia. Previous to this he held conducting positions in Germany and is still active as a guest conductor in Europe.

    The son of a physician, Shannon hails from a long line of medical professionals. Combining the performing arts with the healing arts, he has developed performance programs for cancer center patients, including children receiving inpatient care and individuals in hospice care. Through a specially developed, evidence-based curriculum focusing on communicating with compassion, Shannon, in collaboration with physician Dr. Jacqueline Huntly, has developed programs using music to help both musicians and healthcare professionals develop new skills to work effectively in a healthcare setting. Most recently the program "Nurturing the Inner Healer" was presented to hundreds of healthcare professionals by the Department of Bioethics and Medical Humanities at Mercer University, where he is an affiliative professor.

  • Benjamin C. Sherman

    Benjamin C. Sherman

    Graduate, Medicine, Neurosurgery

    BioBen is an MD/MS student at Drexel University conducting research in the rNET lab under Dr. Vivek Buch. He is from Perkasie PA, and traveled to Washington DC for his undergraduate studies at George Washington University. He initially majored in political science, but discovered a fascination with the mind and brain, assisting in the development of GWU's BS Neuroscience degree. He graduated cum laude among the first class of the Neuroscience program with a minor in psychology. He returned home to Pennsylvania to begin his studies in medical school, further exploring his interest in neurosciences via clinical and translational research involving functional neurosurgery. He studied under Dr. Buch remotely while on rotations and is now on-site at Stanford University to complete his MS thesis. He enjoys swimming, camping, cooking, and spending time with his shiba inu, Doge.

  • Lawrence Shuer, MD

    Lawrence Shuer, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have clinical research interests in the surgical treatment of epilepsy. I am also interested in new developments in the treatment of craniosynostosis a congenital abnormality of infant's skulls

  • Ruwan Silva, MD, MPhil

    Ruwan Silva, MD, MPhil

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Ophthalmology
    Clinical Assistant Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioProfessor Ruwan Amila Silva, MD, MPhil is board certified and fellowship trained vitreoretinal surgeon in the department of ophthalmology at Stanford University Medical Center. He received his BA in Neurobiology from Harvard University graduating Magna cum laude with Highest Honors. He then received his Masters of Philosophy (MPhil) in Neurobiology from Cambridge University in England. Following this, he received his medical degree from Stanford University’s School of Medicine. Dr. Silva completed his ophthalmology residency at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, the top rated eye hospital in the country. While there he was awarded the Heed Fellowship, the most prestigious national award for ophthalmology residents in the country. Dr. Silva returned to Stanford University to complete his vitreoretinal surgery fellowship where he was awarded the Ronald G. Michels Foundation Award, the nation’s highest honor for a retina surgery fellow. During his fellowship at Stanford he was also awarded the prestigious Evangelos S. Gragoudas Award by the Macula Society. Following fellowship, Dr. Silva remained at Stanford University's School of Medicine as an Assistant Professor of Vitreoretinal Surgery in the Department of Ophthalmology. Since 2015, he has been named one of “America’s Top Ophthalmologists” by Consumers’ Research Council of America. He was also selected as a "Top Ophthalmologist" by the International Association of Ophthalmologists.

    Dr. Silva's clinical practice focuses mainly on macular degeneration and retinal vascular disease (such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusions and central serous retinopathy). Surgically, he specializes in diseases of the vitreous and retina: including repair of retinal detachments, surgery for the macula (such as treatment of epiretinal membranes and macular holes) and correction of dislocated intraocular lenses. His research interests mainly involve developing novel therapies for these diseases (http://med.stanford.edu/artificial-retina.html) and have resulted in over 50 combined peer-reviewed scientific manuscripts, book chapters and national meeting presentations.

    Dr. Silva is a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, as well as the American Society of Retina Specialists. He is a Board Certified Diplomate of the American Board of Ophthalmology.

  • Gerald Silverberg

    Gerald Silverberg

    Professor of Neurosurgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAge-related changes in the blood-brain barrier (BBB)and on CSF dynsmics decrease the clearance of toxic metabolites, such as amyloid beta peptides (A-betas), from the brain. I am studing the effects of aging and hydrocephalus on the BBB receptors that transport A-betas and on the formation and bulk flow of CSF.

  • Harminder Singh, M.D.

    Harminder Singh, M.D.

    Clinical Professor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMinimally Invasive Cranial and Spinal Surgery, Endoscopic Keyhole Surgery

  • Stephen Skirboll

    Stephen Skirboll

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on screening strategies to identify and characterize cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human gliomas. We are pursuing this in several ways: 1) a novel colony-forming antibody live cell array to identify distinct CSC surface phenotypes, 2) RNAi screens to identify kinases critical for CSC tumorigenicity, 3) high throughput small molecule and chemical screens to identify compounds that selectively kill or target CSCs, and 4) identifying CSCs using the tumor specific EGFRvIII

  • Ivan Soltesz

    Ivan Soltesz

    James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences

    BioIvan Soltesz received his doctorate in Budapest and conducted postdoctoral research at universities at Oxford, London, Stanford and Dallas. He established his laboratory at the University of California, Irvine, in 1995. He became full Professor in 2003, and served as department Chair from 2006 to July 2015. He returned to Stanford in 2015 as the James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. His major research interest is focused on neuronal microcircuits, network oscillations, cannabinoid signaling and the mechanistic bases of circuit dysfunction in epilepsy.
    His laboratory employs a combination of closely integrated experimental and theoretical techniques, including closed-loop in vivo optogenetics, paired patch clamp recordings, in vivo electrophysiological recordings from identified interneurons in awake mice, 2-photon imaging, machine learning-aided 3D video analysis of behavior, video-EEG recordings, behavioral approaches, and large-scale computational modeling methods using supercomputers. He is the author of a book on GABAergic microcircuits (Diversity in the Neuronal Machine, Oxford University Press), and editor of a book on Computational Neuroscience in Epilepsy (Academic Press/Elsevier). He co-founded the first Gordon Research Conference on the Mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and epilepsy, and taught for five years in the Ion Channels Course at Cold Springs Harbor. He has over 30 years of research experience, with over 20 years as a faculty involved in the training of graduate students (total of 16, 6 of them MD/PhDs) and postdoctoral fellows (20), many of whom received fellowship awards, K99 grants, joined prestigious residency programs and became independent faculty.

  • Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery
    On Leave from 06/03/2024 To 08/16/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical and research interests focus on the development of new radiation techniques involving stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant and benign tumors of the brain and spine, as well as functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia.

  • Konstantina M. Stankovic, MD, PhD, FACS

    Konstantina M. Stankovic, MD, PhD, FACS

    Bertarelli Foundation Professor and Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur investigative efforts are organized along 3 research thrusts:
    1. Vestibular schwannoma: uncovering mechanisms of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and identifying better therapies;
    2. High-resolution imaging of the inner ear;
    3. Novel sensing of and therapies for SNHL.
    Given the complex, multifaceted nature of these problems, our approach to them involves domain-specific customization and fusion of tools from molecular biology, systems neuroscience, biotechnology and otologic surgery.

  • Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Bernard and Ronni Lacroute-William Randolph Hearst Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory investigates the pathophysiology and treatment of cerebral ischemia, and methods to restore neurologic function after stroke. Treatment strategies include brain hypothermia, stem cell transplantation and optogenetic stimulation. Our clinical research develops innovative surgical, endovascular and radiosurgical approaches for treating difficult intracranial aneurysms, complex vascular malformations and occlusive disease, including Moyamoya disease, as well as stem cell transplant.

  • Thomas Sudhof

    Thomas Sudhof

    Avram Goldstein Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInformation transfer at synapses mediates information processing in brain, and is impaired in many brain diseases. Thomas Südhof is interested in how synapses are formed, how presynaptic terminals release neurotransmitters at synapses, and how synapses become dysfunctional in diseases such as autism or Alzheimer's disease. To address these questions, Südhof's laboratory employs approaches ranging from biophysical studies to the electrophysiological and behavioral analyses of mutant mice.