School of Medicine


Showing 51-59 of 59 Results

  • Ayesha Sujan

    Ayesha Sujan

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioAyesha Sujan, PhD, is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. Before joining Stanford University, she completed a year-long postdoctoral fellowship in the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, her doctoral training in the Department of Psychological and Brian Sciences at Indiana University – Bloomington, her clinical internship at the Medical University of South Carolina, her master’s degree in Human Development from Cornell University, and her bachelor’s degree from Tulane University. Though her training has focused on psychological science, her training spans multiple disciplines, including epidemiology and pharmacology.

    Broadly speaking, she conducts translational research focused on preventing early exposure to risk factors from having adverse consequences on child development. Her research initially focused on early-life adversities, particularly abuse and neglect, and then expanded to include the prenatal period. Though she studies the consequences of a number of pregnancy-related risk factors, her work mainly focuses on prenatal exposure to psychoactive substances (e.g., opioids and antidepressants) and risk for adverse birth outcomes (e.g., preterm birth) and neurodevelopmental problems (e.g., autism spectrum disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder). She uses real-world health care data because women cannot be randomly assigned to use psychoactive substances during pregnancy due to ethical concerns about exposing developing offspring to potentially harmful substances. Given that people who use psychoactive substances during pregnancy differ from those who do not, she uses innovative methods that help account for these differences and seeks converging evidence across multiple methods. For example, one method she uses compares children who were exposed during pregnancy to their own siblings who were not exposed. This method accounts for all genetic and environmental factors shared by the siblings and, thus, provides a strong test of the consequences of substance exposure during pregnancy. Her research has important clinical implications. For example, a paper she published in JAMA suggests that adverse outcomes associated with prenatal exposure to antidepressants are largely due to background factors rather than medication exposure itself. This finding could provide reassurance to people considering antidepressant use during pregnancy. Her hope is that her research will inform policies and practices and will, thereby, help improve the health and wellbeing of mothers and their children.

  • Pervez Sultan

    Pervez Sultan

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Pervez Sultan is an Associate Professor of Obstetric Anesthesiology, at Stanford University School of Medicine and also holds an Honorary Faculty position as Associate Professor at University College London. His research interests include defining, characterizing and measuring postpartum recovery.

    Pervez is an Arline and Pete Harman Endowed Faculty Scholar of the Stanford Maternal and Child Health Research Institute at Stanford University.

    He is an elected member of the Association of University Anesthesiologists and currently serves on the Annual Meeting and Live Events and Curriculum Steering Committees of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology in addition to the American Society of Anesthesiologists' Subcommittee for Obstetric Anesthesia and the International Anesthesia Research Society. He is a former recipient of the UK National Institute of Academic Anesthesia Research Award.

    Researchgate profile: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Pervez_Sultan2
    Google Scholar profile: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Z2ftv_IAAAAJ&hl=en
    Twitter: @PervezSultanMD
    Website: www.postpartumrecovery.net

  • Eric Sun

    Eric Sun

    Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult-MSD) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research examines questions of health economics and health policy, with a focus on economics and policy in the perioperative setting. Current research topics include the economics of treatments for chronic pain, as well as how physician practice organization affects outcomes and costs.

  • Louise Y Sun

    Louise Y Sun

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Louise Sun recently joined the Stanford University School of Medicine as the Chief of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology and Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine. She is an Adjunct Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) in Toronto. Prior to this, she was an Associate Professor of Anesthesiology and Epidemiology, Director of Big Data and Health Bioinformatics Research at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, and a Clinical Research Chair in Big Data and Cardiovascular Outcomes at the University of Ottawa.

    Dr. Sun received her medical degree from McMaster University. She completed her anesthesiology residency at the University of Ottawa and her Masters of Science in Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, followed by a clinical and research fellowship in cardiac anesthesia at the University of Toronto. She then joined the Division of Cardiac Anesthesiology at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute and was cross appointed as an ICES faculty member.

    Dr. Sun’s areas of clinical focus are hemodynamic monitoring and heart failure. Her methodologic areas of focus are the conduct of population-based cohort studies using large healthcare databases; predictive analytics; sex and gender epidemiology; patient engagement; innovative methods for data processing and warehousing; and software and applications development. Her research leverages big data and digital technology to bridge key gaps in the delivery of care and outcomes for patients with heart failure and/or undergoing cardiovascular interventions, zooming in on sex/gender and personalized care. She holds several patents and collaborates with health authorities and policy makers to evaluate and report on models of cardiac healthcare delivery.

    Dr. Sun is active in the scientific community. She sits on a number of US, Canadian and international editorial boards and scientific and grant review committees, and collaborates nationally and internationally on a variety of population health and data science initiatives. Her patient-centered research program aims to improve access to care and outcomes, focusing on personalized risk stratification and long-term, patient-defined outcomes. She has authored over 100 peer-reviewed papers and published in leading clinical journals including JAMA, JAMA Cardiology, JAMA Internal Medicine, Circulation, JACC, Diabetes Care, and Anesthesiology. Her research program has been well funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, and the Ontario Ministry of Health.