School of Medicine


Showing 41-60 of 62 Results

  • Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Sulaiman Somani

    Sulaiman Somani

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other
    Resident in Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestscomputer vision, personalized medicine, cardiology, clinical informatics

  • Ehab Sorial

    Ehab Sorial

    Clinical Associate Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    BioGraduated from the University of Minya, Faculty of Medicine in Egypt. He completed his general surgery residency from Harbor–UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles and Western Reserve Care system in Youngstown, Ohio 2015. He completed his fellowship training in vascular surgery at the University of Kentucky in Lexington in 2007. Dr. Sorial is board certified in both Vascular Surgery and General Surgery.

    He joined Stanford Vascular Surgery in 2015. He is currently Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery in the Division of Vascular Surgery. Dr. Sorial had previously served as an Assistant then an Associate Professor at the University of Kentucky from 2007 through 2015. Dr. Ehab Sorial is a staff surgeon at the Santa Clara Valley Medical center in San Jose CA.

  • Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPulmonary Arterial Hypertension
    Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling
    Modulation of BMP signaling
    BMP signaling in health and disease in the right ventricle of the heart
    "BMP signature" in blood as a biomarker
    BMP signaling in neonatal chronic lung disease

  • Joshua M. Spin

    Joshua M. Spin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Spin began his research career studying the structural biology of low density lipoprotein, and has been augmenting his skills with intensive training in molecular biology techniques, particularly those involving high-throughput genetic expression profiling. He is especially interested in vascular smooth muscle cells, and the role of smooth muscle differentiation and phenotypic switching in development and vascular disease. His latest work has focused on the biology of aortic aneurysms.

  • James Spudich

    James Spudich

    Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Disease, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe general research interest of this laboratory is the molecular basis of cell motility, with a current emphasis on power output by the human heart. We have three specific research interests, the molecular basis of energy transduction that leads to ATP-driven myosin movement on actin, the biochemical basis of the regulation of actin and myosin interaction and their assembly states, and the roles these proteins play in vivo, in cell movement, changes in cell shape and muscle contraction.

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMarcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D is a Professor of Medicine Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and by courtesy, Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Stefanick’s research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. She is currently the Principal Investigator the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Extension Study, having been the PI of the Stanford Clinical Center of the landmark WHI Clinical Trials and Observational Study since 1994 and Chair of the WHI Steering and Executive Committees from 1998-2011, as well as PI of the WHI Strong and Healthy (WHISH) Trial which is testing the hypothesis that a DHHS-based physical activity intervention, being delivered to a multi-ethnic cohort of about 24,000 WHI participants across the U.S., aged 68-99 when the trial started in 2015, will reduce major cardiovascular events over 8 years, compared to an equal number of “usual activity” controls. Dr. Stefanick is also PI of the Osteoporotic Study of Men (MrOS) which is continuing to conduct clinical assessments of bone and body composition in survivors of an original cohort of nearly 6000 men aged 65 and over in 2001. As founding Director of the Stanford Women’s Health and Sex Differences in Medicine (WHSDM, “wisdom”) Center, she plays a major role in promoting research and teaching on Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease, Women’s Health and Queer Health and Medicine. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles at the Stanford School of Medicine, including as co-leader of the Population Sciences Program of the Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford’s NCI-funded comprehensive cancer center.

    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology, with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research led to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, which has been her academic home for nearly 40 years.

  • Lea Steffes

    Lea Steffes

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Pulmonary Medicine

    BioDr. Steffes, a Wisconsin native, completed medical school and pediatric residency at the Medical College of Wisconsin. She then moved to the Bay Area and completed her clinical fellowship in pediatric pulmonary medicine at Stanford University in 2020. Additionally, Dr. Steffes received further post-doctoral training in the laboratories of Dr. Maya Kumar and Dr. David Cornfield, studying the cellular and molecular mechanism driving pulmonary vascular disease. In addition to her role as an Instructor in Pediatrics in the division of Pulmonary Medicine, Dr. Steffes is also completing an advanced clinical fellowship in Pulmonary Hypertension at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. Her clinical work consists of caring for patients with pediatric pulmonary and pulmonary vascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, interstitial lung disease, respiratory failure, chronic cough and asthma. Her research is focused on the vascular changes seen in pulmonary hypertension, more specifically understanding the cellular characteristics of occlusive neointimal lesions, the abnormal cells that block pulmonary blood flow in pulmonary hypertension. In her most recent work, Dr. Steffes identified a subset of healthy vascular smooth muscle cells that are the cell of origin for the pathologic neointimal cells and a specific signaling pathway, that when blocked, inhibits the formation of neointimal lesions.

    Dr. Steffes is currently employing advanced single cell sequencing technologies to further understand neointimal cells with the ultimate goal identifying new therapies for pulmonary hypertension, a fatal disease with no known cure.

  • Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Bernard and Ronni Lacroute-William Randolph Hearst Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory investigates the pathophysiology and treatment of cerebral ischemia, and methods to restore neurologic function after stroke. Treatment strategies include brain hypothermia, stem cell transplantation and optogenetic stimulation. Our clinical research develops innovative surgical, endovascular and radiosurgical approaches for treating difficult intracranial aneurysms, complex vascular malformations and occlusive disease, including Moyamoya disease, as well as stem cell transplant.

  • Lars Steinmetz

    Lars Steinmetz

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe apply diverse genomic approaches to understand how genetic variation affects health and disease by: 1) functional and mechanistic analyses of gene regulation, 2) studies of meiotic recombination and inheritance, 3) analyses of genetic and environmental interactions, and 4) characterization of diseases in human cells and model organisms. We integrate wet lab and computational genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic approaches, and develop technologies to enable personalized medicine.

  • Jordan R. Stern, MD

    Jordan R. Stern, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    BioDr. Stern is a board-certified, fellowship-trained specialist in vascular surgery in the Stanford Vascular and Endovascular Care program. He is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Stern’s clinical and academic interests focus on the treatment of aortic disease. He is a leader in the development of novel treatment strategies for aortic pathology and specializes in minimally invasive, endovascular repair of complex aneurysms and aortic dissection.

    For each patient, he develops a personalized treatment plan. The goal is the best possible vascular health and quality of life for every individual in his care.

    Patients praise Dr. Stern’s knowledge and attention to detail. They also appreciate his kindness and compassion, his approachability, and the effort he makes to thoroughly answer all questions from patients and their families.

    In addition to providing expert patient care, he is the principal investigator on several clinical trials. He is also involved in many additional research endeavors, examining contemporary practice patterns and outcomes from endovascular and open surgical procedures.

    He has published the results of his research in numerous journal articles. They have appeared in the Journal of Vascular Surgery, Journal of the American College of Surgery, and many other peer-reviewed journals. The majority of his publications have focused on aortic disease.

    He is an editorial board member of the journal Annals of Vascular Surgery and previously was an assistant editor of the Journal of Endovascular Therapy. He also has co-authored chapters in textbooks such as Novel and Evolving Aortic Endovascular Devices and the Atlas of Vascular and Endovascular Techniques.

    Dr. Stern has presented his research discoveries to his peers at international, national, and regional meetings. He is a fellow of the Society for Vascular Surgery. He is a member of the Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Society (VESS), where he also serves as inaugural chair of the VESS Research Consortium as well as on the Program Committee. He is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a member of the Society for Clinical Vascular Surgery and Western Vascular Society.

  • Simon H. Stertzer, MD, FACC,FAHA,FACP

    Simon H. Stertzer, MD, FACC,FAHA,FACP

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCoronary Angioplasty; Intramyocardial Stem cell delivery

  • Frank E. Stockdale

    Frank E. Stockdale

    Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLaboratory and clinical research in breast cancer ; Normal and abornal differentiation and growth

  • Han Sun

    Han Sun

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Genetics
    Biostatistician 2, Pediatrics - Endocrinology

    BioHan had been a postdoc with Dr. Steinmetz at the genetics department for five years, working on both cancers and heart diseases, trying to understand the mechanisms linking from variants to disease phenotypes. This led to a few very interesting findings of aberrant splicing regulation, such as splicing-mediated readthrough stabilization (SRS), one more mechanism for oncogene activation in multiple types of cancers, and tissue-specific splicing of a mitochondrial inner membrane protein, suggesting a molecular connection between deficiency in energy-supplying and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    After being a senior computational biologist with Dr. Gloyn, who has been dedicated to the research of type 2 diabetes for decades, Han switched to the field of this multifactorial metabolic disease. It did take some courage to make such a switch at his post-postdoc stage, however, Han has a consistent interest in studying PG&E, which is not pacific gas and electric nearby, but the interaction between phenotype, genotype, and environment. With years of hands-on experience in statistical modeling and the analysis of next-generation sequencing and mass spectrometry data, in addition to a good understanding of disease genetics, cancer biology, and systems biology, Han is highly confident that he will enjoy the adventure and contribute to our understanding of diabetes.

  • Katrin J Svensson

    Katrin J Svensson

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular metabolism
    Protein biochemistry
    Cell biology and function
    Animal physiology

  • James Swartz

    James Swartz

    James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering
    On Leave from 10/01/2022 To 06/30/2023

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProgram Overview

    The world we enjoy, including the oxygen we breathe, has been beneficially created by biological systems. Consequently, we believe that innovative biotechnologies can also serve to help correct a natural world that non-natural technologies have pushed out of balance. We must work together to provide a sustainable world system capable of equitably improving the lives of over 10 billion people.
    Toward that objective, our program focuses on human health as well as planet health. To address particularly difficult challenges, we seek to synergistically combine: 1) the design and evolution of complex protein-based nanoparticles and enzymatic systems with 2) innovative, uniquely capable cell-free production technologies.
    To advance human health we focus on: a) achieving the 120 year-old dream of producing “magic bullets”; smart nanoparticles that deliver therapeutics or genetic therapies only to specific cells in our bodies; b) precisely designing and efficiently producing vaccines that mimic viruses to stimulate safe and protective immune responses; and c) providing a rapid point-of-care liquid biopsy that will count and harvest circulating tumor cells.
    To address planet health we are pursuing biotechnologies to: a) inexpensively use atmospheric CO2 to produce commodity biochemicals as the basis for a new carbon negative chemical industry, and b) mitigate the intermittency challenges of photovoltaic and wind produced electricity by producing hydrogen either from biomass sugars or directly from sunlight.
    More than 25 years ago, Professor Swartz began his pioneering work to develop cell-free biotechnologies. The new ability to precisely focus biological systems toward efficiently addressing new, “non-natural” objectives has proven tremendously useful as we seek to address the crucial and very difficult challenges listed above. Another critical feature of the program is the courage (or naivete) to approach important objectives that require the development and integration of several necessary-but- not-sufficient technology advances.