School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 11 Results

  • Randall Vagelos, MD

    Randall Vagelos, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI. Congestive Heart Failure New Medical Therapies Prognostic Evaluation Selection for Cardiac Transplantation II. Screening for Myocardial Necrosis New ECG Monitoring Devices New Serum Markers III. Screening for CAD Patients Who Have Received Radiation Rx Diabetics Being Considered for Renal Transplantation
    IV. Advanced coronary and valvular disease, evaluationg candidacy for high risk interventions.

  • Hannah Valantine

    Hannah Valantine

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is focused on understanding the mechanism mediating acute and chronic allograft failure, in particular on the role of microvascular injury in acute allograft failure and the mechanisms of mediating transplant coronary artery disease. 1. Role of microvascular injury in acute allograft failure.

  • Pieter van der Starre

    Pieter van der Starre

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiovascular Pharmacology, Cardiovascular Physiology,
    Neurophysiology and Monitoring,
    Transesophageal Echocardiography

  • Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD

    Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD

    William R. Brody Professor of Pediatric Radiology and Child Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group is focused on developing new fast and quantitative MRI techniques.

  • Ross Daniel Venook

    Ross Daniel Venook

    Senior Lecturer of Bioengineering

    BioRoss is a Senior Lecturer in the Bioengineering department and he directs Engineering at the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign.

    Ross co-leads three undergraduate courses at Stanford—an instrumentation lab (BIOE123) and an open-ended capstone design lab sequence (BIOE141A/B)—and he supports other courses and runs hands-on workshops in the areas of prototyping and systems engineering related to medical device innovation. He enjoys the unique challenges and constraints offered by biomedical engineering projects, and he delights in the opportunity for collaborative learning in a problem-solving environment.

    An Electrical Engineer by training (Stanford BS, MS, PhD), Ross’ graduate work focused on building and applying new types of MRI hardware for interventional and device-related uses. Following a Biodesign Innovation fellowship, Ross helped to start the MRI safety program at Boston Scientific Neuromodulation, where he continues working across the MRI safety community to create and improve international standards and to enable safe MRI access for patients with implanted medical devices.

  • Abraham Verghese, MD, MACP

    Abraham Verghese, MD, MACP

    Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interest is in clinical skills and the bedside exam, both in its technical aspects, but also in the importance of the ritual and what is conveyed by the physician's presence and technique at the bedside. This work interests me from an educational point of view, and also from the point of view of ethnographic studies related to rituals and how they transform the patient-physician relationship. Recently we have become interested in medical error as a result of oversights in the bedside exam.

  • Jose Vilches-Moure

    Jose Vilches-Moure

    Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicine

    BioDr. José G. Vilches-Moure, DVM, PhD, Assistant Professor, received his DVM degree from Purdue University in Indiana in 2007. He completed his residency training in Anatomic Pathology (with emphasis in pathology of laboratory animal species) and his PhD in Comparative Pathology at the University of California-Davis. He joined Stanford in 2015, and is the Director of the Animal Histology Services (AHS). Dr. Vilches-Moure is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists, and his collaborative research interests include cardiac development and pathology, developmental pathology, and refinement of animal models in which to study early cancer detection techniques. His teaching interests include comparative anatomy/histology, general pathology, comparative pathology, and pathology of laboratory animal species.

  • Melissa Ann Vogelsong

    Melissa Ann Vogelsong

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Vogelsong is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University where she is involved in clinical work, education, and research. She completed her residency and dual fellowship training in Adult Cardiothoracic Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine at Stanford and now attends in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU) and cardiac ORs. This clinical work continuously reveals the ability of modern medicine to overcome seemingly insurmountable injury and illness, yet she believes that optimal care helps a patient to return to the highest level of functioning possible. Thus her research centers around finding ways to optimize the quality of life for survivors of critical illness, particularly those supported on mechanical circulatory support and those who have suffered cardiac arrest. She has received funding from the Zoll Foundation and serves as a member of the American Heart Association's Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science Subcommittee.

    Additionally, Dr. Vogelsong serves as Associate Medical Director for Life Flight, Stanford's air medical transport service and the only hospital-based flight program in California. She is actively engaged in efforts to enhance the provision of critical care within Stanford Hospital, and serves on multiple committees including the Medical Emergency Response Committee (MERC), ECMO Task Force, and CVICU Continuous Quality Improvement group.

    When not at work, Dr. Vogelsong is a huge fan of life in California and can often be found hiking, on a mountain bike, in her Sprinter van, or talking to her many goats, llamas, and horses.