School of Medicine


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  • Randall Vagelos, MD

    Randall Vagelos, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI. Congestive Heart Failure New Medical Therapies Prognostic Evaluation Selection for Cardiac Transplantation II. Screening for Myocardial Necrosis New ECG Monitoring Devices New Serum Markers III. Screening for CAD Patients Who Have Received Radiation Rx Diabetics Being Considered for Renal Transplantation
    IV. Advanced coronary and valvular disease, evaluationg candidacy for high risk interventions.

  • Hannah Valantine

    Hannah Valantine

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is focused on understanding the mechanism mediating acute and chronic allograft failure, in particular on the role of microvascular injury in acute allograft failure and the mechanisms of mediating transplant coronary artery disease. 1. Role of microvascular injury in acute allograft failure.

  • Laurens van de Wiel

    Laurens van de Wiel

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioLaurens van de Wiel is Dutch scientist from Berghem, The Netherlands. Laurens spent his undergrad in Software Development (BSc, Avans Hogeschool ‘s-Hertogenbosch) and Computing Science (MSc, Radboud University Nijmegen). Laurens continued his career at a start-up, where he created large-scale, real-time analytical software. Laurens continued on his academic trajectory at the Radboudumc in Nijmegen, where he started his PhD in bioinformatics.

    During his PhD, Laurens integrated genetic data with protein 3D structures and protein domains. He utilized the skills he obtained before setting out on his academic trajectory; building large-scale, robust, reliable software. Exemplified by the MetaDome Web server (https://stuart.radboudumc.nl/metadome/). During his PhD, he developed novel methodologies for the interpretation of genetic variants of unknown clinical significance and, by integrating structural and evolutionary biology with genomics, Laurens identified 36 novel disease-gene associations for developmental disorders. These discoveries enabled diagnosis for over 500 families worldwide.

    Laurens’ areas of expertise are (bioinformatic) software development, data integration of genetic variation with other omics, and his research aims are:
    1.) Lessons long-learned in computer science aid computational biology
    2.) Multi-omic data integration allows the impact measurement of genetic variation
    3.) Diagnosing undiagnosed disorders will uncover novel insights into biology.
    4.) International and multidisciplinary collaborations are key in diagnosing rare disorders.

    At Stanford University, under guidance of Dr. Matthew Wheeler, he is conducting his postdoctoral studies in line with his research aims.