School of Medicine


Showing 1-17 of 17 Results

  • Randall Vagelos, MD

    Randall Vagelos, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI. Congestive Heart Failure New Medical Therapies Prognostic Evaluation Selection for Cardiac Transplantation II. Screening for Myocardial Necrosis New ECG Monitoring Devices New Serum Markers III. Screening for CAD Patients Who Have Received Radiation Rx Diabetics Being Considered for Renal Transplantation
    IV. Advanced coronary and valvular disease, evaluationg candidacy for high risk interventions.

  • Hannah Valantine

    Hannah Valantine

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is focused on understanding the mechanism mediating acute and chronic allograft failure, in particular on the role of microvascular injury in acute allograft failure and the mechanisms of mediating transplant coronary artery disease. 1. Role of microvascular injury in acute allograft failure.

  • Pieter van der Starre

    Pieter van der Starre

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiovascular Pharmacology, Cardiovascular Physiology,
    Neurophysiology and Monitoring,
    Transesophageal Echocardiography

  • Roxanna Van Norman

    Roxanna Van Norman

    Sr. Marketing Manager, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Role at StanfordSr. Marketing Manager, Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery

  • Alison Schroer Vander Roest

    Alison Schroer Vander Roest

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    BioMy research interests are in the field of cardiac mechanobiology, seeking to understand how the mechanical environment in the heart influences cell behavior and cardiac function throughout pediatric development and disease. I completed my PhD at Vanderbilt working with Dave Merryman focusing on fibroblast activation and inflammatory cell recruitment after myocardial infarction. I was excited for the opportunity to pursue postdoctoral training at Stanford, initially under the mentorship of Dr. Beth Pruitt in mechanical and bioengineering and Dr. Jim Spudich in biochemistry. My postdoctoral project has focused on the effect of myosin mutations which cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) using human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) derived cardiomyocytes. I have learned techniques for hydrogel micropatterning and quantification of cellular scale forces through traction force and FRET microscopy. I have also participated in many exciting collaborations across Stanford (with Dr. Alex Dunn and Dr. Sean Wu), as well as collaborators at different institutions. My background in biomedical engineering has informed my quantitative and systems-based approach to biological questions, and my current appointment in the medical school working with Dr. Dan Bernstein has provided me with the opportunity to learn more about the realities of clinical care in pediatric cardiology.

  • Anubodh Sunny Varshney

    Anubodh Sunny Varshney

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other
    Fellow in Medicine

    BioDr. Anubodh Sunny Varshney is an Advanced Heart Failure, Transplant Cardiology, and Mechanical Circulatory Support Fellow at Stanford University. Sunny engages in outcomes and epidemiology research related to cardiogenic shock, mechanical circulatory support, advanced heart failure, and the interactions between drug and device therapies in patients with heart failure. He earned a BS in biomedical engineering (cum laude) at Washington University in St. Louis and MD from The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, where he graduated 1st in his class. He completed residency in Internal Medicine and fellowship in Cardiovascular Medicine at Brigham & Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, including a T32 research fellowship and a year as the Daniel Pierce Family Fellow in Advanced Heart Disease.

    Sunny also has experience advising multiple medical device, drug, and digital health start-ups and currently serves as an Advisor to Broadview Ventures, a philanthropically-funded venture fund that invests in early-stage companies developing technologies that have the potential to change standard of care for patients with cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular risk factors, or stroke.

    After fellowship, Sunny plans to pursue a career as a clinical advanced heart failure cardiologist, outcomes researcher, and venture advisor. He intends to combine insights from clinical care and outcomes research to identify persistent unmet medical needs, define benchmark outcomes that next generation technologies should improve upon, and identify target populations for early-stage studies of novel drug and device therapies for patients with heart failure.

  • Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD

    Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD

    William R. Brody Professor of Pediatric Radiology and Child Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group is focused on developing new fast and quantitative MRI techniques.

  • Ross Daniel Venook

    Ross Daniel Venook

    Senior Lecturer of Bioengineering

    BioRoss is a Senior Lecturer in the Bioengineering department and he directs Engineering at the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign.

    Ross co-leads three undergraduate courses at Stanford—an instrumentation lab (BIOE123) and an open-ended capstone design lab sequence (BIOE141A/B)—and he supports other courses and runs hands-on workshops in the areas of prototyping and systems engineering related to medical device innovation. He enjoys the unique challenges and constraints offered by biomedical engineering projects, and he delights in the opportunity for collaborative learning in a problem-solving environment.

    An Electrical Engineer by training (Stanford BS, MS, PhD), Ross’ graduate work focused on building and applying new types of MRI hardware for interventional and device-related uses. Following a Biodesign Innovation fellowship, Ross helped to start the MRI safety program at Boston Scientific Neuromodulation, where he continues working across the MRI safety community to create and improve international standards and to enable safe MRI access for patients with implanted medical devices.

  • Carlos Vera

    Carlos Vera

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Cardiovascular Institute

    BioCarlos obtained his B.S. in Industrial Biotechnology from the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. He received his PhD from the University of Colorado at Boulder working with Dr. Leslie Leinwand on myosin myopathies. His dissertation focused on analyzing the effects on myosin's cross-bridge cycle from mutations associated to Hypertrophic (HCM) and Dilated (DCM) cardiomyopathies. For his postdoc he will focus on disease mechanisms that can influence severity.

  • Abraham Verghese, MD, MACP

    Abraham Verghese, MD, MACP

    Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interest is in clinical skills and the bedside exam, both in its technical aspects, but also in the importance of the ritual and what is conveyed by the physician's presence and technique at the bedside. This work interests me from an educational point of view, and also from the point of view of ethnographic studies related to rituals and how they transform the patient-physician relationship. Recently we have become interested in medical error as a result of oversights in the bedside exam.

  • Jose Vilches-Moure

    Jose Vilches-Moure

    Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicine

    BioDr. José G. Vilches-Moure, DVM, PhD, Assistant Professor, received his DVM degree from Purdue University in Indiana in 2007. He completed his residency training in Anatomic Pathology (with emphasis in pathology of laboratory animal species) and his PhD in Comparative Pathology at the University of California-Davis. He joined Stanford in 2015, and is the Director of the Animal Histology Services (AHS). Dr. Vilches-Moure is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists, and his collaborative research interests include cardiac development and pathology, developmental pathology, and refinement of animal models in which to study early cancer detection techniques. His teaching interests include comparative anatomy/histology, general pathology, comparative pathology, and pathology of laboratory animal species.

  • Melissa Ann Vogelsong

    Melissa Ann Vogelsong

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Vogelsong is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University where she is involved in clinical work, education, and research. She completed her residency and dual fellowship training in Adult Cardiothoracic Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine at Stanford and now attends in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU) and cardiac ORs. This clinical work continuously reveals the ability of modern medicine to overcome seemingly insurmountable injury and illness, yet she believes that optimal care helps a patient to return to the highest level of functioning possible. Thus her research centers around finding ways to optimize the quality of life for survivors of critical illness, particularly those supported on mechanical circulatory support and those who have suffered cardiac arrest. She has received funding from the Zoll Foundation and serves as a member of the American Heart Association's Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science Subcommittee.

    Additionally, Dr. Vogelsong serves as Associate Medical Director for Life Flight, Stanford's air medical transport service and the only hospital-based flight program in California. She is actively engaged in efforts to enhance the provision of critical care within Stanford Hospital, and serves on multiple committees including the Medical Emergency Response Committee (MERC), ECMO Task Force, and CVICU Continuous Quality Improvement group.

    When not at work, Dr. Vogelsong is a huge fan of life in California and can often be found hiking, on a mountain bike, in her Sprinter van, or talking to her many goats, llamas, and horses.

  • Nirali Vora

    Nirali Vora

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Nirali Vora is a Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology and Neurological sciences at Stanford University. She is board certified in Adult Neurology and Vascular Neurology after completing her residency and advanced fellowship training at Stanford. She provides comprehensive care for all stroke patients, as well as hospitalized adults with acute or undiagnosed neurological conditions. She specializes in treating vascular disorders including TIA, vasculitis, dissection, venous thrombosis, and undetermined or “cryptogenic” causes of stroke.

    Dr. Vora directs the Stanford Global Health Neurology program, through which she started the first stroke unit in Zimbabwe and gained experience in HIV neurology and other neuro-infectious diseases. Additional research interests include stroke prevention, TIA triage, eliminating disparities in health care, and neurology education. She is also the Director of the Stanford Adult Neurology Residency Program.