School of Medicine


Showing 51-60 of 77 Results

  • Celina Yong, MD, MBA, MSc

    Celina Yong, MD, MBA, MSc

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioCelina Yong, MD, MBA, MSc is Director of Interventional Cardiology at the Palo Alto VA Medical Center and an Associate Professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford. Dr. Yong completed her medical training at Stanford School of Medicine and her internal medicine residency at the University of California, San Francisco. She completed her cardiology and interventional cardiology fellowships at Stanford, including serving as Chief Fellow. As a Marshall Scholar, she completed a Masters in Health Policy, Planning and Financing from the London School of Economics and an MBA from Oxford.

    Dr. Yong’s current research focuses on understanding and reducing inequities in cardiovascular care for patients, as well as resolving gender imbalances in the medical profession itself. She is actively involved in clinical trials of novel devices for percutaneous coronary and structural intervention, and performs structural and coronary interventions at the Palo Alto VA Hospital.

  • Audrey Yoon, DDS

    Audrey Yoon, DDS

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Sleep Medicine

    BioDr. Yoon is a double board-certified sleep specialist with the Stanford Health Care Sleep Medicine Center. She is currently a Clinical Professor in the Division of Sleep Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She uses her extensive orthodontic experience to diagnose and treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children and adults. Dr. Yoon specializes in surgical and non-surgical OSA treatments, such as miniscrew-assisted rapid palatal expansion (MARPE), distraction osteogenesis maxillary expansion (DOME), and maxillomandibular advancement (MMA). These procedures restructure the palate, nasal airway, or jaw to improve airflow.

    Her research interests include modifying head and face growth to improve sleep-disordered breathing in children and creating customized appliances that help reshape bones in the mouth, jaw, and face over time. She has also studied genetic anatomical factors related to OSA. Dr. Yoon worked with Stanford Medicine researchers to develop a new DOME technique, and she established and proposed a surgery-first approach protocol for MMA. With this approach, doctors surgically reposition the jaw before starting orthodontic treatment. The surgery-first approach can reduce the amount of time patients need to undergo orthodontic treatment.

    Dr. Yoon has published in many peer-reviewed journals, including Sleep, Sleep Medicine, the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, and she has written numerous book chapters. She has presented to her colleagues all over the nation and the world, including those in Germany, Italy, Australia, Chile, Singapore and China. Her presentations have covered a range of topics, such as the latest techniques in craniofacial (head and face) growth modification.

    Dr. Yoon is a founding co-president of the World Dentofacial Sleep Society. She established a dental sleep medicine specialty clinic in the Division of Sleep Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. She also established the Dental Sleep Medicine Clinic at the University of the Pacific and is currently a program director of the Pacific Ortho-Dental Sleep Medicine Fellowship Program. Dr. Yoon also serves on the board of directors for the California Sleep Society, Angle Orthodontists, and the Korean Association of Dental Sleep Medicine.

    She is a diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics and the American Board of Dental Sleep Medicine.

  • Jong H. Yoon

    Jong H. Yoon

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health & Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research seeks to discover the brain mechanisms responsible for schizophrenia and to translate this knowledge into the clinic to improve how we diagnose and treat this condition. Towards these ends, our group has been developing cutting-edge neuroimaging tools to identify neurobiological abnormalities and test novel systems-level disease models of psychosis and schizophrenia directly in individuals with these conditions.

    We have been particularly interested in the role of neocortical-basal ganglia circuit dysfunction. A working hypothesis is that some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia are attributable to impairments in neocortical function that results in disconnectivity with components of the basal ganglia and dysregulation of their activity. The Yoon Lab has developed new high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging methods to more precisely measure the function of basal ganglia components, which given their small size and location deep within the brain has been challenging. This includes ways to measure the activity of nuclei that store and control the release of dopamine throughout the brain, a neurochemical that is one of the most important factors in the production of psychosis in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric conditions.

  • Luke Yoon, MD

    Luke Yoon, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology

    BioLuke Yoon, MD, is a Clinical Associate Professor and Associate Chair of Faculty Well-being and Development in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Yoon is a radiologist specializing in body imaging and musculoskeletal imaging. A graduate of Yale College and Yale School of Medicine, Dr. Yoon completed his post-graduate training at Harvard affiliated hospitals: internal medicine internship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and radiology residency and fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital. Prior to joining Stanford Radiology, Dr. Yoon worked as an attending radiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Singleton Associates, and Baylor College of Medicine. His clinical interests include physician well-being, cystic renal mass imaging, and liver mass classification.

  • Dokyoung Sophia You, PhD

    Dokyoung Sophia You, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioI am interested in investigating the role of stress and emotion regulatory system in chronic pain and substance use. I am also interested in identifying EEG markers for critical psychological and neurocognitive factors contributing to worsening or improving pain symptoms and substance use disorder. Ultimately, my research goal is to develop mechanisms-based psychological interventions for patients suffering from chronic pain to optimize pain management strategies with less medications and substances and to help patients live meaningful life.

  • Kyan Younes, MD

    Kyan Younes, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Younes is a fellowship-trained, board-certified neurologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His areas of expertise include the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, primary progressive aphasia, Lewy body dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus and cognitive and behavioral impairments. For each patient, Dr. Younes develops a personalized plan of care. A plan may include his close collaboration with experts from psychiatry, nursing, pharmacy, genetic counseling, and other specialties. His goal is to ensure that each patient receives care that is both comprehensive and compassionate.

    To help lead advances and innovations in his field, Dr. Younes conducts extensive research. He is studying the clinical, neuropsychological, socioemotional, genetic, and pathological features when a patient experiences degeneration of the right anterior temporal lobe area of the brain. This disorder can affect a person’s ability to process emotions and person-specific knowledge.

    He also is researching how multimodal brain imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) combined with machine learning can help improve the detection of neurodegenerative diseases. In other research, he has participated in clinical trials of new drug therapies for Alzheimer’s disease.

    Dr. Younes has presented research findings at meetings of the American Neurological Association, American Academy of Neurology, and American Psychiatric Association. Topics have included predictors of cognitive performance in dementia.

    He has co-authored research articles published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, Journal of Neuroimaging, and elsewhere. Subjects of these articles have included guidelines for diagnosing the effects of right anterior temporal lobe degeneration on behavior, treatment for symptoms of encephalitis, and the impact of mild traumatic brain injury on healthy older adults.

    Dr. Younes has written chapters on frontotemporal dementia for Psychiatric Clinics as well as the epilepsy, coma, acute ischemic stroke, meningitis and encephalitis chapters for the textbook The Little Black Book of Neurology.

    He is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association, Alzheimer’s Association, and International Society for Frontotemporal Dementias.

  • Christina Young

    Christina Young

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Christina Young obtained her PhD in Clinical Psychology as well as her MS in Statistics at Northwestern University. She completed her predoctoral internship at the University of Illinois Chicago where she specialized in neuropsychology. She continued her neuropsychology training as well as her research during her postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University.

    Dr. Young's research focuses on identifying real-world declines in cognition that track with the pathological changes in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related dementias. Her work incorporates novel measures of cognition as well as neuroimaging to improve the detection and monitoring of early cognitive decline in the context of AD and related dementias. She has been awarded grant funding through a K99/R00 from the NIH and an Alzheimer's Association Research Fellowship to Promote Diversity (AARF-D) from the Alzheimer's Association.