School of Medicine


Showing 1-18 of 18 Results

  • Sanno Zack

    Sanno Zack

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Zack is involved with ongoing research related to the treatment of adolescent and adult trauma (Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - TF-CBT; Prolonged Exposure - PE), and the effective provision of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) to adolescent girls and women with disorder of emotion regulation. She additionally studies Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for adolescent girls with anxiety. More broadly she is interested in the impact of Evidenced Based Treatments on improving quality of life, and helping individuals find the right match for clinical care. Research is conducted through the Early Life Stress and Pediatric Anxiety Disorders Program at Stanford Children's Hospital and the Stanford Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program.

  • Mira Zein

    Mira Zein

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Zein received her dual bachelor’s degrees in Anthropology and Physiological Science at UCLA and worked initially as a healthcare consultant, developing programs that improve healthcare access for vulnerable populations. She returned to school to pursue a Masters in Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, where she further developed her interests in the intersection of medicine and broader social-cultural themes, particularly the impact on mental health. Her research foci were disaster response interventions for physical and mental health and the impact of the built environment on public health. During her masters, she worked with the International Rescue Committee in Baltimore to help address the acculturation and psychological stress the Baltimore refugee population faced in resettlement.

    In 2010, Dr. Zein began her medical training at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. During medical school she continue to pursue interests in global and cultural health. She represented McGill nationally as the Global Health Advocate in the Canadian Federation of Medical Students, and focused on national and local clinical projects to support refugee and asylum seeker access to medical and mental health treatment. She was awarded the Mona Bronfman Sheckman Prize in Psychiatry for her work. During her psychiatry residency training at New York University (NYU), Dr. Zein continued pursuing her interest in global mental health, working as a group leader for refugees/asylum seekers in the Bellevue Survivors of Torture program, and the Association for Culture and Psychiatry. She also became interested in Integrated Behavioral Health, particularly the University of Washington's Ambulatory Integration of the Medical and Social (AIMs) model, or Collaborative Care Model. She founded the Integrated Behavioral Health resident working group and designed a two-year resident training program in the Collaborative Care Model as well as pioneered other electives in HIV psychiatry and psych-oncology. She completed training in the AIMs model and also was part of an intensive collaborative pilot with the AIMs center to a complete a quality-improvement (QI) project in the Bellevue Hospital primary care site. As part of the two-year resident training program she developed a Collaborative Care model in one of NYU Langone-Brooklyn's FQHC sites. In her last two years of residency she was an APA Leadership Fellow, and served on the APA Consult-Liaison Psychiatry Committee. She worked on a Decisional Capacity Guidelines paper with other committee members, and presented on Consult Liaison educational opportunities and Integrated Behavioral Health Models at the APA conference. She completed residency as a chief resident and won awards for Excellence in Resident Teaching as well as for humanism and clinical excellence in the Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program

    Dr. Zein completed her Consult Liaison Fellowship at Stanford and has remained as clinical faculty. She is currently serving as an attending psychiatrist on the General, Intensive Care, and ED-Psychiatry consult services as well as developing an Integrated Behavioral Health model for the Stanford Primary Care Clinic serving Cisco employees and their families.

  • Jamie Zeitzer

    Jamie Zeitzer

    Associate Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Zeitzer is a circadian physiologist specializing in the understanding of the impact of light on circadian rhythms and other aspects of non-image forming light perception.
    He examines the manner in which humans respond to light and ways to manipulate this responsiveness, with direct application to jet lag, shift work, and altered sleep timing in teens. Dr. Zeitzer has also pioneered the use of actigraphy in the determination of epiphenomenal markers of psychiatric disorders.

  • Xue Zhang

    Xue Zhang

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    BioDr. Zhang received her Ph.D. degree in 2019 in Biomedical Engineering from Tsinghua University School of Medicine. She was a Visiting Student Researcher in the Radiology Department at Stanford in 2017-2018. Her dissertation research focused on identifying neuroimaging markers for depression vulnerability through fMRI and simultaneous fPET-fMRI.

    Dr. Zhang was interested in methods development for dynamic fMRI and fPET analysis, especially in characterizing brain dynamics through resting-state fMRI in psychiatric diseases (depression and anxiety).

    Dr. Zhang joined PanLab in 2020 on two projects: 1) examining human structural and functional changes relevant to drug abuse on the brain’s risk and reward circuits; 2) engaging self-regulation targets to understand the mechanisms of behavior change and improve mood and weight outcomes (ENGAGE).

  • Yu Zhang

    Yu Zhang

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    BioYu Zhang received the Ph.D. degree in Control Science and Engineering from East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China. He worked as a Research Associate for two years in the Laboratory for Advanced Brain Signal Processing at RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Japan, where he has focused on developing advanced pattern recognition algorithm for EEG analysis with applications in brain-computer interfaces. He worked as a Postdoctoral Fellows for one year at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he has mainly studied in functional brain network analysis with fMRI for brain disease diagnosis. He is working in the Etkin Lab at Stanford University as a Postdoctoral Fellows and has focused on machine learning-based sophisticated analysis of EEG and fMRI connectivity with TMS for various medical applications, including subtype identification, treatment outcome prediction, and so on. His research interests include computational neuroscience, brain network, medical imaging computing, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and signal processing.

  • Yuan Zhang

    Yuan Zhang

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    BioI was trained in cognitive neuroscience and computer science. My current research interests involve using multimodal neuroimaging and advanced computational methods to characterize brain network organization underlying affective and cognitive processing in children with and without neurodevelopmental disorders.

  • Qingyu Zhao

    Qingyu Zhao

    Research Scientist, Psych/Major Laboratories and Clinical & Translational Neurosciences Incubator

    BioI am generally interested in using image analysis techniques to improve detection, diagnosis and treatment of diseases. My research interests particularly lie in the areas of non-linear statistics and machine learning applied to translational neuroscience.

  • Lindsey Eileen Zimmerman

    Lindsey Eileen Zimmerman

    Affiliate, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioLindsey Zimmerman, PhD, is a Clinical and Community Psychologist, and Implementation Scientist at the National Center for PTSD, Dissemination and Training Division of the Veterans Health Administration.

    Dr. Zimmerman is principal investigator of National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Veterans Health Administration (VA) research that enlists participatory system dynamics to increase timely patient access to evidence-based pharmacotherapy and evidence-based psychotherapy for depression, PTSD, alcohol and opioid use disorder. See https://mtl.how/team



    Active NIH Grants

    Participatory System Dynamics vs Audit and Feedback: A Cluster Randomized Trial of Mechanisms Of Implementation Change to Expand Reach of Evidence-Based Addiction and Mental Health Care (R01DA046651)

    The most common reasons Veterans seek VA addiction and mental health care is for help with opioid and alcohol misuse, depression and PTSD. Research evidence has established highly effective treatments that prevent relapse, overdose and suicide, but even with policy mandates, performance metrics, and electronic health records to fix the problem, these treatments may only reach 3-28% of patients. This study tests participatory business engineering methods to better meet the addiction and mental health needs of Veterans and the U.S. population.


    Participatory System Dynamics for Evidence-Based Addiction and Mental Healthcare (R21DA042198)

    Limited access and delays to high-quality, evidence-based mental health and addiction treatments can lead to patients getting too little or ineffective care and contribute to chronic patient impairment, relapse, and death by suicide or overdose. This study evaluates a system for resolving problems with patient flow and organization in health care systems, using electronic medical record systems and a high-level of input from healthcare leadership, frontline providers and patients.


    Active VA Grants

    Participatory System Dynamics vs Usual Quality Improvement: Is Staff Use of Simulation an Effective, Scalable and Affordable Way to Improve Timely Veteran Access to High-quality Mental Health Care? (I01HX002521)

    Participatory system dynamics (PSD) helps improve quality with existing resources, critical in mental health and all VA health care. PSD uses learning simulations to improve staff decisions, showing how goals for quality can best be achieved given local resources and constraints. We aim to significantly increase the proportion of patients who start and complete evidence-based care, and determine the costs of using PSD for improvement.


    National Responsibilities

    2019 National Institutes of Health, Center for Scientific Review
    Community Influences on Health Behavior (CIHB) Study Section

    2019-present VA Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) 
    QUERI/Health Services Research & Development, Scientific Merit Review Committee

    2019-present Emory University
    Prolonged Exposure Consultant Training Program Advisory Board

    2018-present National Institutes of Health
    Training Institute for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH)
    Mental Health Faculty Mentor

    2015-2017 National Institutes of Health Loan Repayment Program
    National Institute of Mental Health Clinical Research Review Committee



    Teaching Responsibilities

    Quality Improvement and Systems of Care Competencies
    Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences Residency, Stanford University School of Medicine & VA Palo Alto Health Care System

    Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program Seminar
    VA Palo Alto research centers of the National Center for PTSD (NCPTSD), Center for Innovation to Implementation (Ci2i), Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Care (MIRECC), and War-related Illness and Injury Study Center (WRIISC).



    Open Science Resources for the Modeling to Learn Simulation Learning Program are available on GitHub at https://mtl.how and https://mtl.how/demo