School of Medicine


Showing 111-117 of 117 Results

  • Sui Wang, PhD

    Sui Wang, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie retinal development and diseases. We utilize genetic and genomic tools to uncover how different types of retinal cells, including retinal neurons, glia and the vasculature, respond to developmental cues and disease insults at the epigenomic and transcriptional levels, and how they interact and collectively contribute to the integrity of the retina.

    1. Retinal cell fate specification.
    We are using genetic tools and methods, such as in vivo plasmid electroporation and CRISPR, to dissect the roles of cis-regulatory elements and transcription factors in controlling retinal cell fate specification.

    2. The multicellular responses elicited by diabetes in the retina.
    Diabetes can induce multicellular responses in the retina, including vascular lesions, glial dysfunction and neurodegeneration, all of which contribute to retinopathy. We are using diabetic rats as models to investigate the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the diabetes-induced multicellular responses, and the disease mechanisms of diabetic retinopathy.

    3. Molecular tools that allow for cell type-specific labeling and manipulation in vivo.
    Cis-regulatory elements, such as enhancers, play essential roles in directing tissue/cell type-specific and stage-specific expression. We are interested in identifying enhancers that can drive cell type-specific expression in the retina and brain, and incorporating them into plasmid or AAV based delivery systems.

  • Mollie Woodworth

    Mollie Woodworth

    Instructor, Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMany types of blindness result from the neurons of the retina no longer being able to communicate with the brain due to injury or disease. In mammals, the adult retina cannot make new retinal ganglion cells (the neurons that connect the retina with the brain) to replace those that are lost. In my work, I aim to learn about normal development of retinal ganglion cells and, further, to regenerate new retinal ganglion cells if they are lost in adulthood.

  • Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy translational research focuses on using autologous stem cells to recreate a patient’s ocular tissues for potential transplantation. We are generating tissue from induced pluripotent stem cells to treat limbal stem cell deficiency in patients who are bilaterally blind. By applying my background in molecular and cellular biology, stem cell biology, oculoplastic surgery, I hope to make regenerative medicine a reality for those suffering from orbital and ocular disease.

  • Charles Q. Yu, MD

    Charles Q. Yu, MD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCorneal opacity is a leading cause of blindness. Cornea transplantation is at high risk of rejection when there is pre-existing vascularization of the cornea and in pediatric patients. Cornea transplant shortage remains a worldwide problem with millions on waitlists. Our laboratory is developing multiple strategies for treatment of corneal blindness. We are testing advanced materials and designs for keratoprostheses with the goal of reducing complications and easing surgical implantation. We are also developing intraocular electronic display prostheses for bypassing cornea opacity, a novel strategy that could allow for high quality vision without corneal clarity.