School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 24 Results

  • Stuart Kim

    Stuart Kim

    Professor of Developmental Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanisms of Aging in C. elegans and humans.

  • David Kingsley

    David Kingsley

    Rudy J. and Daphne Donohue Munzer Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use mice, stickleback fish, and humans to study the molecular basis of evolution and common diseases. By combining genetics and genomics, we have identified key DNA changes that control bone formation, limb patterning, hair color, brain evolution, and susceptibility to arthritis, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. We find that the same genetic mechanisms are often used repeatedly in nature, providing new insights into the origin of key traits in many different species, including ourselves.

  • Kyle Loh

    Kyle Loh

    Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology (Stem Cell)

    BioHow the richly varied cell-types in the human body arise from one embryonic cell is a biological marvel and mystery. We have mapped how human embryonic stem cells develop into over twenty different human cell-types. This roadmap allowed us to generate enriched populations of human liver, bone, heart and blood vessel precursors in a Petri dish from embryonic stem cells. Each of these tissue precursors could regenerate their cognate tissue upon injection into respective mouse models, with relevance to regenerative medicine. In addition to our interests in developmental and stem cell biology, we also interested in discovering the entry receptors and target cells of deadly biosafety level 4 viruses, together with our collaborators.

    Kyle attended the County College of Morris and Rutgers University, and received his Ph.D. from Stanford University (working with Irving Weissman), with fellowships from the Hertz Foundation, National Science Foundation and Davidson Institute for Talent Development. He then continued as a Siebel Investigator, and later, as an Assistant Professor and The Anthony DiGenova Endowed Faculty Scholar at Stanford, where he is jointly appointed in the Department of Developmental Biology and Institute for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine. Kyle is a Packard Fellow, Pew Scholar, Human Frontier Science Program Young Investigator and Baxter Foundation Faculty Scholar, and his research has been recognized by the NIH Director's Early Independence Award, Forbes 30 Under 30, Harold Weintraub Graduate Award, Hertz Foundation Thesis Prize and A*STAR Investigatorship.

  • Nicole M. Martinez

    Nicole M. Martinez

    Assistant Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Martinez lab studies RNA regulatory mechanisms that control gene expression. We focus on mRNA processing, RNA modifications and their roles in development and disease.

  • Harley H McAdams

    Harley H McAdams

    Professor (Research) of Developmental Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental and theoretical analysis and modeling of genetic regulatory circuits, particularly bacterial regulation and with emphasis on global regulation of Caulobacter crescentus. Bioinformatic analysis of bacterial genomes, global patterns of gene transcription and translation.

  • Roeland Nusse

    Roeland Nusse

    Virginia and Daniel K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Research and the Reed-Hodgson Professor of Human Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies Wnt signaling in development and disease. We found recently that Wnt proteins are unusual growth factors, because they are lipid-modified. We discovered that Wnt proteins promote the proliferation of stem cells of various origins. Current work is directed at understanding the function of the lipid on the Wnt, using Wnt proteins as factors the expand stem cells and on understanding Wnt signaling during repair and regeneration after tissue injury.

  • Ellen Porzig

    Ellen Porzig

    Professor (Teaching) of Developmental Biology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEarly Human Developmental Biology:
    From Egg to Embryo
    Organogenesis: Pattern formation
    Sex Determination in Embryogenesis

  • Florentine Rutaganira

    Florentine Rutaganira

    Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and of Developmental Biology

    BioDr. Rutaganira uses choanoflagellates—the closest living single-celled relatives to animals—to study the origin of animal cell communication. Dr. Rutaganira applies chemical, genetic, and cell biological tools to probe choanoflagellate cell-cell communication, with implications for understanding not only animal cell signaling, but also the origin of multicellularity in animals.

  • Matthew P. Scott

    Matthew P. Scott

    Professor of Developmental Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research has been focused on the genetic regulation of animal development and its relation to birth defects, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We studied mechanisms and functions of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, which controls cell fates and growth, in the context of normal development and brain cancer. We studied a neurodegenerative disease, Niemann-Pick C syndrome, that affects intracellular organelle movements and sterol homeostasis. Due to Dr. Scott's new job, the lab is no longer active.

  • Lucy Shapiro

    Lucy Shapiro

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA basic question in developmental biology involves the mechanisms used to generate the three-dimensional organization of a cell from a one-dimensional genetic code. Our goal is to define these mechanisms using both molecular genetics and biochemistry.