School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 574 Results

  • Olivia Altamirano, PhD

    Olivia Altamirano, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCulturally Sensitive Therapy is a group psychotherapy for people with early psychosis and their families. Study aims are to understand if this treatment is compatible with this population, to assess improvements in family functioning and mental health symptoms, to assess mediating factors (e.g., increased usage of adaptive religious and other cultural beliefs/values), and to assess longevity of improvements. Last, we aim to qualitatively understand participants’ experiences with this treatment.

  • Neal Amin

    Neal Amin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Neal D. Amin's research findings on gene regulatory mechanisms in the human nervous system have been the basis of articles in top journals, patents, awards, and research funding. He is corresponding author on works identifying cell type-specific RNA processing changes implicated in neurodegeneration. Other products of his research include a sole-author patent on gene delivery, speaking engagements at national and international conferences, and recognition and significant research funding from the NIH and private foundations including the BBRF and the Deeda Blair Research Initiative. His work applies advanced single cell transcriptomics, mice and human brain organoids, and deep learning models to identify gene regulatory network hubs associated with a wide range of diseases.

    Dr. Amin is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Stanford University where he leads fundamental wet and dry lab research into brain development and disease. He an attending physician in Stanford's Evaluation Clinic where he continues to see patients. He completed the Research Track Psychiatry Residency Program at Stanford University and is a board-certified psychiatrist and his postdoctoral studies with Sergiu Pasca, MD. He earned MD and PhD degrees from the University of California, San Diego with his graduate mentor Samuel L. Pfaff, PhD, at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, CA. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts from Columbia College, Columbia University.

  • James Armontrout

    James Armontrout

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Armontrout is the Program Director of the Stanford Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship. He completed residency training at the Harvard Longwood Psychiatry Residency Training Program, followed by forensic psychiatry fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco. He is board certified in Psychiatry, Forensic Psychiatry, and Addiction Medicine.

    Before coming to Stanford Dr. Armontrout worked as a staff psychiatrist for the Palo Alto VA Healthcare System at the Trauma Recovery Program, a residential treatment program focusing on PTSD, other trauma-related disorders, and substance use disorders. For a portion of Dr. Armontrout's time with the VA he served as the Medical Director for the Trauma Recovery Program.

    In addition to his forensic fellowship activities, Dr. Armontrout currently serves as an attending in the Stanford PTSD clinic and the dual diagnosis clinic.

  • Bruce Arnow, Ph.D.

    Bruce Arnow, Ph.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology - Adult)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research interests include treatment outcome for major depression, particularly treatment refractory and chronic forms of major depression, as well as mediators and moderators of outcome; the epidemiology of chronic pain and depression; relationships between child maltreatment and adult sequelae, including psychiatric, medical and health care utilization.

  • Ryan T. Ash MD, PhD

    Ryan T. Ash MD, PhD

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioMy lab is interested in developing novel neuromodulation technologies to augment neuroplasticity and enhance the "unlearning" of maladaptive habitual ways of relating to the to the world. I have a K08 Career Development Award to measure how attention modulates neuroplasticity induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, using EEG steady-state visual evoked potentials and visual attention psychophysics. I have a Brain Behavior Research Foundation Young Investigator Award to develop in-human applications of transcranial ultrasound stimulation in the subcortical visual system and fear regulation circuit. I have a Simons Foundation Bridge to independence Award to develop closed-loop ultrasound neuromodulation technologies to enhance behavioral flexibility in autism spectrum disorders. I work closely with mentors Anthony Norcia, Kim Butts Pauly, and Nolan Williams on these projects. I am interested in the neural basis of mindfulness, concentration, and compassion practices from Buddhist meditation, and I have more than a year of silent retreat experience in the Theravada Buddhist meditation tradition. I see patients in the Stanford Neuropsychiatry clinic with a specialization in Functional Neurological disorders and related psychosomatic and dissociative conditions. My therapeutic orientations include integrated psychodynamic- and mindfulness-based approaches and neuromodulation-assisted psychotherapy.