School of Medicine


Showing 21-22 of 22 Results

  • Kenneth Tran, MD

    Kenneth Tran, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    BioDr. Tran is a board-certified vascular surgeon in the Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Division at Stanford Health Care. He is also a clinical assistant professor of surgery at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Tran graduated with high honors from the University of Virginia School of Engineering in 2011 and earned his medical degree from Stanford University School of Medicine in 2016. He completed his surgical training at Stanford University School of Medicine, culminating in his completion of the Vascular Surgery Integrated Residency at Stanford in 2023. During his residency, Dr. Tran completed a two-year NIH-funded fellowship under the mentorship of Dr. Alison Marsden. This fellowship focused on using computer simulations of blood flow to enhance the treatment of vascular diseases.

    Dr. Tran's research pursuits center on expanding the use of computational simulation techniques to understand changes in blood flow after different vascular treatments. He also has a special interest in using customized grafts to repair complex aortic conditions. Dr. Tran studies blood flow and clinical outcomes after treatment with these customized aortic grafts.

    He has published his work in numerous prestigious peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Vascular Surgery, JAMA Surgery, and the European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery. He has presented at the podium at numerous national and international conferences. Dr. Tran has also received multiple research awards, including the Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Society’s Medtronic Resident Research Award, the best resident presentation at the Swiss Society for Vascular Diseases, and the Young Researcher Prize at the European Symposium on Vascular Biomaterials. He also co-authored a chapter in the book Complications in Endovascular Surgery.

    Dr. Tran’s clinical interests include the entire spectrum of vascular surgery, including but not limited to:
    • Traditional and minimally invasive strategies for aortic aneurysm repair
    • Traditional, minimally invasive, and hybrid methods for managing peripheral vascular disease
    • Management of cerebrovascular disease, including carotid angioplasty/stenting, transcarotid artery revascularization (TCAR), and conventional carotid surgery
    • Comprehensive dialysis access creation
    • Treatment of venous reflux

  • Clay P. Wiske, MD

    Clay P. Wiske, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    BioDr. Wiske is a vascular surgeon in the Vascular and Endovascular Care program at Stanford Health Care. He is also a clinical assistant professor of surgery in the Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery. Dr. Wiske manages and treats the full spectrum of vascular disease, performing both open and endovascular surgery.

    His clinical interests include peripheral arterial disease, venous disease, dialysis access, and aortic and peripheral aneurysms. Additionally, he has helped develop and evaluate medical devices designed to maximize the ease of treatment and limit the invasiveness of specific interventions.

    Dr. Wiske has published research on a variety of topics within vascular surgery. These include the best approaches to reduce the risk of stroke associated with carotid surgery and the impact of using multidisciplinary teams to identify and treat pulmonary embolisms. Dr. Wiske has also participated in studies assessing the pace of innovation in vascular surgery, as well as policy approaches to reducing the financial burden of health care on patients.

    Dr. Wiske has published his work in numerous peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of the American Medical Association, the Journal of Vascular Surgery, and Vascular and Endovascular Surgery. He has also been an invited guest speaker at national and international meetings, including those for the Society for Vascular Surgery, American Venous Forum, and the Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Society.