School of Medicine


Showing 41-44 of 44 Results

  • Nina Vasan, MD, MBA

    Nina Vasan, MD, MBA

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMental illness is the greatest thief of human potential today. By harnessing the power of medicine, entrepreneurship, and technology, we can return that potential to the 2 billion people suffering around the world.

    Brainstorm is the world's first academic laboratory dedicated to transforming mental health through innovation and entrepreneurship.

  • Shannon Wiltsey Stirman

    Shannon Wiltsey Stirman

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe overarching goal of my program of research is to determine how to facilitate access to evidence-based psychosocial interventions (EBPs) in community and public sector mental health settings. Areas of emphasis include training and consultation, treatment fidelity and adaptation, AI and digital mental health interventions, and the identification of strategies that promote sustained implementation of EBPs.

  • Jerome Yesavage

    Jerome Yesavage

    Jared and Mae Tinklenberg Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study cognitive processes and aging in our research center. Studies range from molecular biology to neuropsychology of cognitive processes.

  • Jong H. Yoon

    Jong H. Yoon

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health & Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research seeks to discover the brain mechanisms responsible for schizophrenia and to translate this knowledge into the clinic to improve how we diagnose and treat this condition. Towards these ends, our group has been developing cutting-edge neuroimaging tools to identify neurobiological abnormalities and test novel systems-level disease models of psychosis and schizophrenia directly in individuals with these conditions.

    We have been particularly interested in the role of neocortical-basal ganglia circuit dysfunction. A working hypothesis is that some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia are attributable to impairments in neocortical function that results in disconnectivity with components of the basal ganglia and dysregulation of their activity. The Yoon Lab has developed new high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging methods to more precisely measure the function of basal ganglia components, which given their small size and location deep within the brain has been challenging. This includes ways to measure the activity of nuclei that store and control the release of dopamine throughout the brain, a neurochemical that is one of the most important factors in the production of psychosis in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric conditions.