School of Medicine


Showing 351-385 of 385 Results

  • Jack Tzu-Chieh Wang

    Jack Tzu-Chieh Wang

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur primary research focus is understanding the molecular mechanisms of axonal degeneration and subsequent failure of axonal regeneration in the CNS. We have identified critical cellular pathways mediating axonal degeneration following acute neurological injuries including ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury. Modulating these pathways presents a novel therapeutic strategy to protect vulnerable nerve fibers and enhance functional recovery in a multitude of acute CNS injuries and diseases.

  • Kevin Wilkins

    Kevin Wilkins

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Neurology and Neurological Sciences

    BioKevin obtained a PhD in Neuroscience from Northwestern University while working in the Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences Department and a BS/BA in Psychology and English from Boston College. His dissertation research focused on understanding the neural mechanisms underlying upper extremity impairments in individuals with chronic stroke and subsequent motor improvements following novel interventions. His postdoctoral work at Stanford with Dr. Helen Bronte-Stewart focuses on the neural features associated with different symptoms in individuals with Parkinson's disease using a combination of structural imaging, neurophysiology, and kinematic analysis. He was awarded a Postdoctoral Fellowship for Basic Scientists from the Parkinson's Foundation to investigate the cognitive correlates of gait impairment in Parkinson's disease.

  • Edward N. Wilson

    Edward N. Wilson

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSingle-cell transcriptomic profiling of immune cells in Alzheimer's disease brain

    Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis biomarkers

    Alzheimer’s disease experimental therapeutics

  • Yohannes Woldeamanuel

    Yohannes Woldeamanuel

    Basic Life Res Scientist, Neurology

    BioDr. Yohannes W. Woldeamanuel M.D. is a translational physician scientist, currently Instructor at Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Center for Innovation in Global Health, Stanford University School of Medicine. He obtained his M.D. from Addis Abeba University Medical Faculty in 2007. Following graduation, Dr. Woldeamanuel was Head of Department of Anatomy, Histology, Embryology at Jimma University School of Medicine where he successfully instructed medical students and other health profession disciplines for a year and a half. Afterwards, he did Clinical Neurology residency training at Addis Abeba University Medical Faculty combined with Basic Science and Clinical Research Fellowships concentrating in the areas of Neuroinfectious Diseases, Neuropathic Pain, Epilepsy, and Neuroepidemiology at Karolinska Institutet - Sweden, Albert Einstein College of Medicine - USA, University of Heidelberg - Germany, and Imperial College London - UK. He completed his PostDoctoral Fellowship in Headache Medicine at the Stanford Headache Program. He is Awardee of several prestigious Fellowships, namely, the International Brain Research Organization (IBRO) John G. Nicholls 2012, International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) Scan|Design Foundation 2010, European Neurological Society (ENS) 2011, and International Headache Society (IHS) 2014. He also has vested interest and expertise in Digital Health as shown by his recent developments of clinically-validated self-management apps for neuropathy (CHANT) and migraine. He has strong track record of publishing many peer-reviewed first-authored articles in several high impact medical journals including The Lancet Oncology, Neurology, Pain, Journal of Neurology, Cephalalgia, and Journal of Neurological Sciences. He has been awarded the 2016 Emerging Leader in Global Health Innovation Award, Consortium of Universities for Global Health from Drs. Anvar and Pari Velji Family Foundation based on his leading role in the development, validation, and field-testing of a clinical instrument for the diagnosis of sensory neuropathy and neuropathic pain (Clinical HIV-Associated Neuropathy Tool or CHANT (Woldeamanuel et al., 2016)). He currently serves as the academic editor for Frontiers in Neurology, BMC Neurology, and BioMed Research International and regularly peer reviews for journals such as Neurology, JNNP, Cephalalgia, Headache. He is an invited editorial board member for the highest impact factor headache journal - The Journal of Headache & Pain. He has received the Publons Peer Review Award for 2017-18 as the Top 1% Reviewer on Publons Global Reviewers Database. He is ranked 3rd among headache and migraine experts from Stanford (see Expertscape rankings at https://expertscape.com/ex/migraine+headache/i/stanford_university). He is the first to receive NINDS/NIH award (K01) for headache research at Stanford. He is a certified Quantitative Sensory Testing investigator in accordance with the world-renowned German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain. He is an elected Member of the Juniors Special Interest Group at the International Headache Society since 2015. Dr. Woldeamanuel consults for his clinic in Addis Abeba, Advanced Clinical & Research Center, where he provides his expertise to neurological and general medical patients.

  • Gregory Jamison Wong

    Gregory Jamison Wong

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other
    Resident in Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioNeurology resident with interest in vascular and interventional neurology.

    Undergraduate: University of California, Los Angeles (2014)
    Medical School: Washington University School of Medicine (2020)
    Internship: Barnes-Jewish Hospital/Washington University Medical Center (2021)

  • Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy projects focus on clinical research in newborns with, or at risk, for brain injury. I use EEG in at-risk neonates to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of risk factors that may lead to worse outcomes. I am particularly interested in neonatal seizures and how they may exacerbate perinatal brain injury with a goal to identify treatments that might protect the vulnerable brain. I am also interested in EEG in other pediatric populations, as well as medical ethics and global health.

  • Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    D. H. Chen Professor II

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUse of genetic and molecular tools to dissect immune and inflammatory pathways in Alzheimer's and neurodegeneration.

  • Yanmin Yang

    Yanmin Yang

    Associate Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsElucidate biological functions of cytoskeletal associated proteins in neurons. Define the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in null mice.

  • Jerome Yesavage

    Jerome Yesavage

    Jared and Mae Tinklenberg Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study cognitive processes and aging in our research center. Studies range from molecular biology to neuropsychology of cognitive processes.

  • Kyan Younes, MD

    Kyan Younes, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Younes is a fellowship-trained, board-certified neurologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His areas of expertise include the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, primary progressive aphasia, Lewy body dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus and cognitive and behavioral impairments. For each patient, Dr. Younes develops a personalized plan of care. A plan may include his close collaboration with experts from psychiatry, nursing, pharmacy, genetic counseling, and other specialties. His goal is to ensure that each patient receives care that is both comprehensive and compassionate.

    To help lead advances and innovations in his field, Dr. Younes conducts extensive research. He is studying the clinical, neuropsychological, socioemotional, genetic, and pathological features when a patient experiences degeneration of the right anterior temporal lobe area of the brain. This disorder can affect a person’s ability to process emotions and person-specific knowledge.

    He also is researching how multimodal brain imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) combined with machine learning can help improve the detection of neurodegenerative diseases. In other research, he has participated in clinical trials of new drug therapies for Alzheimer’s disease.

    Dr. Younes has presented research findings at meetings of the American Neurological Association, American Academy of Neurology, and American Psychiatric Association. Topics have included predictors of cognitive performance in dementia.

    He has co-authored research articles published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, Journal of Neuroimaging, and elsewhere. Subjects of these articles have included guidelines for diagnosing the effects of right anterior temporal lobe degeneration on behavior, treatment for symptoms of encephalitis, and the impact of mild traumatic brain injury on healthy older adults.

    Dr. Younes has written chapters on frontotemporal dementia for Psychiatric Clinics as well as the epilepsy, coma, acute ischemic stroke, meningitis and encephalitis chapters for the textbook The Little Black Book of Neurology.

    He is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association, Alzheimer’s Association, and International Society for Frontotemporal Dementias.

  • Maya Yutsis

    Maya Yutsis

    Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated), Neurology

    BioMaya Yutsis, Ph.D., ABPP-CN is a Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She is a neuropsychologist at the Stanford Alzheimer's Disease and Research Center (ADRC), Stanford Concussion and Sports Medicine Clinic, and Neuropsychology Service. She received her doctorate in clinical psychology at the Palo AltoUniversity in 2009, completed an APA approved clinical internship in neuropsychology at the Minneapolis VA Medical center and a two-year post doctoral fellowship in Clinical Neuropsychology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN in 2011. She received her board certification in Clinical Neuropsychology through the American Board of Professional Psychology. Prior to coming to Stanford, she worked as a lead neuropsychologist at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Polytrauma Transitional Rehabilitation Program and Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC) Telehealth Neuropsychology clinic and served as a director/preceptor of an APA-approved post-doctoral fellowship Neuropsychology Emphasis Area training program. She is currently a Newsletter Editor of the Society for Clinical Neuropsychology, APA Division 40. Her research interests focus on computerized assessment and interventions for persons with acquired brain injury, sport-related concussion, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

    PUBLICATIONS (Selected from 15)
    Yam, A, Rickards, T, Pawlowski, C, Yutsis, M. (in Press). Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation Approach for Functional Neurological Symptom (Conversion) Disorder: A Case Study. Rehabilitation Psychology

    Duchnick, J, Ropacki, S.A., Yutsis, M.V., Petska, K., & Pawlowski, C.A., (2015). Polytrauma Transitional Rehabilitation Programs: Comprehensive, holistic rehabilitation for community integration after brain injury. Psychological Services, 5.

    Yochim, B, Beaudreau, S, Fairchild, JK, Yutsis, M, Raymond, N, Friedman, L, Yesavage, J. (2015). A Verbal Naming Test for use with older adults: Development and initial validation. Journal of International Neuropsychological Society, 21, 239-248.

    Bergquist, T, Yutsis, M, Sullan, M. (2014). Satisfaction with cognitive rehabilitation delivered via the Internet in persons with acquired brain injury. International Journal of Telerehabilitation, 6(2), 39-50.

    Giese-Davis, J., Tamagawa, R., Yutsis, M., Twirbutt, S., Piemme, K., Neri, E., Taylor, C. B., Spiegel, D. (2012) Which symptoms matter? Self-report and observer discrepancies in repressors and high-anxious women with metastatic breast cancer. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Published online October 20, 2012.

    Yutsis, M., Bergquist, T., Micklewright, J. Smigielski, J., Brown, A. (2012) Pre-treatment compensation use is a better correlate of activity limitations than cognitive impairment in persons with acquired brain injury. Brain Injury, 26(11),1297-1306.

    Bergquist, T., Micklewright, J., Yutsis, M., Smigielski, J., Gehl, C., Brown, A. (2012) Achievement of client-centered goals by persons with acquired brain injury in comprehensive day treatment is associated with greater vocational and residential independence at discharge and 1 year follow-up. Brain Injury,26(11), 1307-1314

    Forducey, PG, Glueckauf, RL, Bergquist, R, Maheu, MM, Yutsis, M (2012). Telehealth for persons with severe functional disabilities and their caregivers: Facilitating self-care management in a home setting. Psychological Services, 9(2), 144-162.

  • Kristy Zera

    Kristy Zera

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Neurology and Neurological Sciences

    BioKristy did her undergraduate work at Bates College in Lewiston, ME where she received a BA in Biology in 2012. She then moved to Athens, GA where she obtained a PhD in Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences from the University of Georgia in 2017. Her research investigated the role of the transcription factor HIF-1a in thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency-induced neurological damage. She joined the Buckwalter lab in late 2017 to continue researching mechanisms of neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. She is interested in investigating the role of astrocytes in neuroinflammation following stroke. Ultimately, understanding how astrocytes mediate neuroinflammation in the context of disease and neurological injury may identify therapeutic targets to protect the brain following injury.

  • Fanglin Zhang, MD

    Fanglin Zhang, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Zhang is a board-certified neurologist, in both neurology and clinical neurophysiology. She serves as a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Zhang excels at the diagnosis and treatment of complicated neurological diseases and her clinical interests are broad, including intractable epilepsy and stroke urgent care.

    With each patient, Dr. Zhang forms a strong alliance focused on overcoming neurological disease and improving quality of life. She practices a patient-centered and evidence-based medicine.

    Dr. Zhang and her colleagues led the Stanford Health Care - ValleyCare Neurology & Neurological Sciences Department response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Efforts focused on the safety of patients and staff and minimizing disruptions to urgent and essential clinical services, such as stroke care.

    Her COVID-19 response efforts also focused on fulfilling Stanford Health Care’s commitment to professional education and training. She enjoys training future neurologists. She has worked to ensure that Stanford Health Care medical students and residents to maintain momentum on their journey to becoming the neurology specialists of tomorrow.

    In addition to delivering clinical care for a wide range of neurological conditions, Dr. Zhang enjoys conducting cutting-edge clinical research. Her work has been published in numerous peer-reviewed journals, such as Neurological Sciences, Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, Neuroimage, Glia, Immunology, the Journal of Psychiatric Practice, Journal of Neuroimmunology, etc. Her current research interest includes clinical trials and a large cohort study of the impact of seizures on stroke outcomes.

    Among her many honors, Dr. Zhang has won a grant award from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Dr. Zhang shows a great enthusiasm in public welfare. She has earned recognition for volunteering her time and expertise at family health centers, hospitals, and schools.

  • Niushen Zhang

    Niushen Zhang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Niushen Zhang is a board-certified neurologist and Chief of the Headache Division in the Department of Neurology. She has a special interest in developing personalized treatment plans for headache patients which incorporate the use of complementary and integrative medicine. She is the Chair of the Complementary and Integrative Medicine Special Interest Section of the American Headache Society (AHS). Her research interests include acupuncture for the treatment of migraine, the impact of diet and nutrition on migraine, and the relationship between cannabis use and medication overuse headache in people with chronic migraine. In addition, she participates in clinical trials of new headache treatments for migraine and cluster headache. Dr. Zhang is also actively involved in medical education. She is the Director of the Headache Fellowship Program at Stanford. She serves as a member of the AHS Match Task Force and the AHS Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Task Force. She is also a curriculum developer for AHS's REACH Program. She spearheaded the design and creation of the AHS National Headache Fellowship Opportunities website which serves as a central resource for all headache fellowship applicants and promotes the AAN's unified fellowship application timeline.

    Dr. Zhang graduated from Yale University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology. She earned an MD from the New York University School of Medicine. She completed neurology residency and fellowship in headache and facial pain at Stanford University.