SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory


Showing 61-80 of 81 Results

  • Charles Prescott

    Charles Prescott

    Professor at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental particle physics; parity violation in electron scattering experiments in End Station A; nucleon spin structure experiments with polarized electron beams and polarized solid targets; e+e- -> Zo studies with the SLD detector using the polarized electron beams of the SLC; Next Linear Collider detector studies; neutrinoless double beta decay in Xenon.

  • Helen Quinn

    Helen Quinn

    Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Emerita

    BioHelen Quinn received her Ph.D in physics at Stanford in 1967. She has taught physics at both Harvard and Stanford. Dr. Quinn work as a particle physicist has been honored by the Dirac Medal (from the International Center for Theoretical Physics, Italy) and the Klein Medal (from The Swedish National Academy of Sciences and Stockholm University) as well as the Sakurai Prize (from the American Physical Society), the Compton medal (from the American Institute of Physics, awarded once every 4 years) and the 2018 Benjamin Franklin Medal for Physics (from the Franklin Institute). She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Science and the American Philosophical Society. She is a Fellow and former president of the American Physical Society. She is originally from Australia and is an Honorary Officer of the Order of Australia.

    Dr. Quinn has been active in science education for some years, and since her retirement in 2010 this has been her major activity. She was a founding member of the Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) which produced a well-known standard-model poster for schools in 1987 (see photo). She served as Chair of the US National Academy of Sciences Board on Science Education (BOSE) from 2009-2014. She was as a member of the BOSE study committee that developed the report “Taking Science to School” and chaired the committee for the “Framework for K-12 Science Education”, which is the basis of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and similar standards now adopted by about 30 states in the US, and has been influential internationally as well. She also contributed to follow-up NRC studies on assessment and implementation of NGSS. From 2015-2018 Helen served at the request of the President of Ecuador as a member of the “Comision Gestora” to help plan and guide the initial development of the National University of Education of Ecuador.

  • Aaron Roodman

    Aaron Roodman

    Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics
    On Leave from 06/01/2024 To 08/31/2024

    BioAaron Roodman is a professor of Particle Physics & Astrophysics at Stanford’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Trained in experimental particle physics, he spent two decades studying differences between Matter and antiMatter, before turning his research to astrophysics and cosmology. Roodman’s current research focuses on the study of Dark Energy using images from large optical telescope surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey and the upcoming Legacy Survey of Space and Time. He is also responsible for the assembly and testing of the world’s largest digital camera, the Vera C. Rubin Observatory's LSST Camera.

  • John Louis Sarrao

    John Louis Sarrao

    Director of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Professor of Photon Science and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioJohn Sarrao became SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory’s sixth director in October 2023. The lab’s ~2,000 staff advance the frontiers of science by exploring how the universe works at the biggest, smallest, and fastest scales and invent powerful tools used by scientists around the globe. SLAC’s research helps solve real-world problems and advances the interests of the nation. SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. It is home to three Office of Science national user facilities: the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s most powerful X-ray laser; the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL); and the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests, (FACET-II). SLAC hosts thousands of users each year and manages an annual budget of ~$700M. In addition to his role as lab director, John is a professor of photon science at Stanford University, a senior fellow at Stanford’s Precourt Institute, and dean of SLAC faculty.

    John came to SLAC from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico, where he served as the deputy director for science, technology, and engineering. In that role, he led multiple directorates, including chemistry, earth and life sciences, global security, physical sciences, and simulation and computation. He also stewarded technology transitions and served as LANL’s chief research officer in support of its national security mission. Before becoming deputy director, he served as associate director for theory, simulation, and computation and division leader for materials physics and applications at LANL.

    John’s scientific research focus is superconductivity in materials. He studies the synthesis and characterization of correlated electron systems, especially actinide materials. He won the 2013 Department of Energy’s E.O. Lawrence Award and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society, and LANL. John received his PhD and master’s degree in physics from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a bachelor’s degree in physics from Stanford University.

  • Philip Schuster

    Philip Schuster

    Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    BioProfessor Schuster is a theoretical physicist focused on identifying dark matter and its properties, developing concepts for new experimental tests of physics beyond the Standard Model, and studying novel theories of long-range forces. He is also directly involved in several experimental efforts as co-spokesperson for APEX, a founding member and physics coordinator for LDMX, and as a founding member of HPS.

    Prospective graduate students interested in research rotations should contact Professor Schuster directly. Recent research directions include new ideas to detect axions, milli-charge dark matter, the use of novel accelerator experiments to search for light WIMP-like dark matter, and generalizations of gauge theories that include massless particles with continuous spin. Publications are listed on INSPIRE.

    Professor Schuster is also chair of the Particle Physics & Astrophysics department at Stanford’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

  • Georgios Skiniotis

    Georgios Skiniotis

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, of Structural Biology and of Photon Science

    BioThe Skiniotis laboratory seeks to resolve structural and mechanistic questions underlying biological processes that are central to cellular physiology. Our investigations employ primarily cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) and 3D reconstruction techniques complemented by biochemistry, biophysics and simulation methods to obtain a dynamic view into the macromolecular complexes carrying out these processes. The main theme in the lab is the structural biology of cell surface receptors that mediate intracellular signaling and communication. Our current main focus is the exploration of the mechanisms responsible for transmembrane signal instigation in cytokine receptors and G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) complexes.

  • Edward I. Solomon

    Edward I. Solomon

    Monroe E. Spaght Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Photon Science
    On Leave from 04/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Solomon's work spans physical-inorganic, bioinorganic, and theoretical-inorganic chemistry, focusing on spectroscopic elucidation of the electronic structure of transition metal complexes and its contribution to reactivity. He has advanced our understanding of metal sites involved in electron transfer, copper sites involved in O2 binding, activation and reduction to water, structure/function correlations over non-heme iron enzymes, and correlation of biological to heterogeneous catalysis.

  • Joachim Stöhr

    Joachim Stöhr

    Professor of Photon Science, Emeritus

    BioEducation:
    1968 Vordiplom in Physics, Bonn University, Germany
    1971 M.S. in Physics, Washington State University, USA
    1974 Dr. rer. nat. in Physics, TU München, Germany

    Professional History:
    Scientist at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (1976-77)
    Senior Research Associate at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (1977-81)
    Senior Staff Physicist at Exxon Research and Engineering Company (1981-85)
    Research Staff Member at IBM Almaden Research Center (1985-89)
    Manager, Department of Condensed Matter Science, IBM ARC (1989-91)
    Manager, Department of Magnetic Materials and Phenomena, IBM ARC (1991-94)
    Manager, Synchrotron Radiation Project, IBM ARC (1994-95)
    Research Staff Member at IBM ARC (1995-99)
    Professor of Photon Science, Stanford University (2000 – 2017)
    Deputy Director, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) (2000-2005)
    Director, SSRL (2005-2009)
    Director, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) (2009-2013)
    Professor Emeritus (2017 – present)

    Fellowships, Awards, Honors:
    Fulbright Scholarship 1969-70
    Postdoctoral Scholarship from Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft 1975-76
    Fellow of the American Physical Society since 1988
    Adjoint Professor in Physics at Uppsala University, Sweden (1993-2000)
    Consulting Professor at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (1994-1999)
    IBM Outstanding Technical Achievement Award 1997
    Hofstadter Lecture, Stanford University, 2010
    Davisson-Germer Prize 2011 in Surface Physics from American Physical Society
    Ångstrom Lecture, Uppsala University, 2017

    Summary of Scientific Work:
    My early scientific research focused on the development of x-ray based surface techniques, especially surface EXAFS and NEXAFS, and their use for the determination of the geometric arrangement and bonding of atoms, molecules and thin organic films on surfaces. This work is summarized in my review article “SEXAFS: Everything you always wanted to know about SEXAFS but were afraid to ask” (in X-Ray Absorption: Principles, Applications, Techniques of EXAFS, SEXAFS and XANES, Edits. D. Koningsberger and R. Prins, Wiley, 1988) and my 1992 book “NEXAFS Spectroscopy” (Springer).

    My later research focused on magnetic materials and phenomena, in particular the study of magnetic thin films, interfaces and nanostructures, and their ultrafast dynamics by use of forefront x-ray techniques. This work forms the foundation of my 2006 book (with H. Siegmann) entitled “Magnetism: From Fundamentals to Nanoscale Dynamics” (Springer).

    With the advent of x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) around 2010 my research increasingly focused on the description of x-rays and their interactions with matter within modern quantum optics, leading to my 2023 book “The Nature of X-Rays and their Interactions with Matter”.
    In total I have written 3 books, 10 review articles in the form of book chapters and about 250 scientific Journal publications. I hold 5 patents and have given more than 150 invited talks at international scientific conferences, about 100 colloquia at Universities and Scientific Research Institutions, and 3 public lectures on the topic of magnetism and x-ray free electron lasers.

    More information on my career, research, students and postdocs is given on my Stanford website: https://stohr.sites.stanford.edu/

  • Hirohisa A. Tanaka

    Hirohisa A. Tanaka

    Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsParticle physics and astrophysics, neutrino properties, dark matter

  • Caterina Vernieri

    Caterina Vernieri

    Assistant Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    BioCaterina Vernieri received her PhD on the CMS experiment from the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa, Italy, in 2014 and then moved to Chicago for a postdoctoral fellowship at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. She joined SLAC in 2018 as a Panofsky Fellow and moved to the ATLAS experiment, and in 2022 she became Assistant Professor.
    Throughout this time, she has been devoted to studying the Higgs boson using data from the LHC. She co-led the group in the CMS experiment studying the Higgs decay to b quarks at the time that this important decay process was finally discovered in the data. At SLAC, Caterina is working with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC with a focus on Higgs physics. She is responsible for the integration activities at SLAC of the new ATLAS Pixel Inner Tracker detector.
    She was also co-convener of the group on Higgs boson properties in the US national study of the future of particle physics.

  • Soichi Wakatsuki

    Soichi Wakatsuki

    Professor of Photon Science and of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUbiquitin signaling: structure, function, and therapeutics
    Ubiquitin is a small protein modifier that is ubiquitously produced in the cells and takes part in the regulation of a wide range of cellular activities such as gene transcription and protein turnover. The key to the diversity of the ubiquitin roles in cells is that it is capable of interacting with other cellular proteins either as a single molecule or as different types of chains. Ubiquitin chains are produced through polymerization of ubiquitin molecules via any of their seven internal lysine residues or the N-terminal methionine residue. Covalent interaction of ubiquitin with other proteins is known as ubiquitination which is carried out through an enzymatic cascade composed of the ubiquitin-activating (E1), ubiquitin-conjugating (E2), and ubiquitin ligase (E3) enzymes. The ubiquitin signals are decoded by the ubiquitin-binding domains (UBDs). These domains often specifically recognize and non-covalently bind to the different ubiquitin species, resulting in distinct signaling outcomes.
    We apply a combination of the structural (including protein crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) etc.), biocomputational and biochemical techniques to study the ubiquitylation and deubiquitination processes, and recognition of the ubiquitin chains by the proteins harboring ubiquitin-binding domains. Current research interests including SARS-COV2 proteases and their interactions with polyubiquitin chains and ubiquitin pathways in host cell responses, with an ultimate goal of providing strategies for effective therapeutics with reduced levels of side effects.

    Protein self-assembly processes and applications.
    The Surface layers (S-layers) are crystalline protein coats surrounding microbial cells. S-layer proteins (SLPs) regulate their extracellular, self-assembly by crystallizing when exposed to an environmental trigger. We have demonstrated that the Caulobacter crescentus SLP readily crystallizes into sheets both in vivo and in vitro via a calcium-triggered multistep assembly pathway. Observing crystallization using a time course of Cryo-EM imaging has revealed a crystalline intermediate wherein N-terminal nucleation domains exhibit motional dynamics with respect to rigid lattice-forming crystallization domains. Rate enhancement of protein crystallization by a discrete nucleation domain may enable engineering of kinetically controllable self-assembling 2D macromolecular nanomaterials. In particular, this is inspiring designing robust novel platform for nano-scale protein scaffolds for structure-based drug design and nano-bioreactor design for the carbon-cycling enzyme pathway enzymes. Current research focuses on development of nano-scaffolds for high throughput in vitro assays and structure determination of small and flexible proteins and their interaction partners using Cryo-EM, and applying them to cancer and anti-viral therapeutics.

    Multiscale imaging and technology developments.
    Multimodal, multiscale imaging modalities will be developed and integrated to understand how molecular level events of key enzymes and protein network are connected to cellular and multi-cellular functions through intra-cellular organization and interactions of the key machineries in the cell. Larger scale organization of these proteins will be studied by solution X-ray scattering and Cryo-EM. Their spatio-temporal arrangements in the cell organelles, membranes, and cytosol will be further studied by X-ray fluorescence imaging and correlated with cryoEM and super-resolution optical microscopy. We apply these multiscale integrative imaging approaches to biomedical, and environmental and bioenergy research questions with Stanford, DOE national labs, and other domestic and international collaborators.