Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


Showing 21-25 of 25 Results

  • Yutong Zhu

    Yutong Zhu

    MBA, expected graduation 2023
    Masters Student in Environment and Resources, admitted Spring 2022

    BioWhen in school, I won a nationwide competition in China to make art out of trash. I built a miniature “Olympic stadium” from styrofoam, a winning submission whose prize was a week-long trip to Hong Kong to learn about recycling. Visiting the city’s recycling facilities changed my life: growing up in the heavily polluted city of Xi’an in the 90s, Hong Kong’s cleanliness shocked me. It was my first encounter with the term “sustainability” and determined my career’s trajectory.

    Carbon-capture materials, hydrogen-producing catalysts, energy-efficient aluminum production: all the products and processes that I developed and commercialized at Australia’s national lab have eliminated millions of tons of carbon dioxide and saved clients millions of dollars in energy expenses. I also helped two battery startups commercialize their technologies, and I evaluated hundreds of climate tech companies at an early-stage venture capital firm.

    Equipped with ten years experience commercializing deep tech from zero to one in the sustainability and climate space, I want to build and scale high-efficiency, mass-market climate solutions after Stanford. Interested? Let’s chat.

  • Mark Zoback

    Mark Zoback

    Benjamin M. Page Professor in Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I conduct research on in situ stress, fault mechanics, and reservoir geomechanics with an emphasis on shale gas, tight gas and tight oil production, the feasibility of long-term geologic storage of CO2 and the occurrence of induced and triggered earthquakes. I was one of the principal investigators of the SAFOD project in which a scientific research well was successfully drilled through the San Andreas Fault at seismogenic depth. I am the author of a textbook entitled Reservoir Geomechanics published in 2007 by Cambridge University Press, now in its sixth printing. I served on the National Academy of Energy committee investigating the Deepwater Horizon accident and the Secretary of Energy’s committee on shale gas development and environmental protection. I currently serve on a Canadian Council of Academies panel investigating the same topic.

    Teaching
    I teach both undergraduate and graduate students. Reservoir Geomechanics is a graduate class for students in the departments of Geophysics, GES, and ERE, and Tectonophysics, a graduate class for students principally in Geophysics and GES. I co-teach a Freshman class entitled Sustainability and Collapse with Professor Ursula Heise of the English Department. I also help lead two graduate seminars each week and frequently attend and participate in other seminars.

    Professional Activities
    Member, Canadian Council of Academies Committee on Shale Gas Development (2012-2013); Member, Secretary of Energy Committee on Shale Gas Development (2011-2012); Member, NAE Committee Investigating Deepwater Horizon Accident (2010-2011); President, American Rock Mechanics Association (2011-2013); Member of Board of RPSEA (2010-); Chair, Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Group of USGS (2007-2011); Advisory Board, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona (2008-2013); Chair, Stanford Faculty Senate (1999-2000); Chair, Department of Geophysics (1991-97); Chair, Science Advisory Group, ICDP (1999-2006); President, Tectonophysics Section, AGU (1988-89)

  • Andrea Zorzi

    Andrea Zorzi

    Ph.D. Student in Geological Sciences, admitted Autumn 2020

    BioBorn in Venice, Italy, I earned my BSc in Aerospace Engineering at Università degli Studi di Padova in 2017. For my MSc degree, I moved to the Netherlands and graduated in Aerospace Engineering at TU Delft in 2019, focusing on space flight, planetary sciences and radiative transfer modeling. Afterwards, I spent a year at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Göttingen (Germany), conducting research on neural network applications for cometary gas expansion studies.
    I've joined Stanford as a GS graduate student in Fall 2020 and I am part of the Planetary Modeling Group led by Prof. Schaefer.
    My focus is on planetary impacts, how they affect the climate and chemical evolution of the atmospheres of planets in their early stages.