Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education


Showing 11-20 of 33 Results

  • Michaela Hulstyn

    Michaela Hulstyn

    SLE Lecturer

    BioMichaela Hulstyn is a Lecturer in Structured Liberal Education (SLE), a first-year residential education program at Stanford University.

    Her first monograph, _Unselfing: Global French Literature at the Limits of Consciousness_, is forthcoming with the University of Toronto Press in 2022. Her research interests center on 20th- and 21st-century French and Francophone literature, phenomenology of the self and intersubjectivity, cognitive approaches to transcultural literature, and literature as ethical philosophy. Her work has appeared in MLN, Philosophy and Literature, and Contemporary French and Francophone Studies, among other places.

    She previously held academic appointments at Florida State University and Reed College.

  • Hyoung Sung Kim

    Hyoung Sung Kim

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioI am interested in the history of philosophy, in particular Kant and post-Kantian German idealism. I am specifically interested in how Kant and his successors saw the relation between questions in epistemology (knowledge), logic (rules for thinking), and metaphysics (what there is).

  • Meade Klingensmith

    Meade Klingensmith

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioMeade Klingensmith is a Lecturer for Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE). He received his BA in History from Oberlin College in 2012, was a Fulbright Postgraduate Scholar at the University of Kent from 2013-14, and completed his PhD in History at Stanford in 2022.

    Meade is a historian of Britain and the British Empire with a theoretical interest in the limits and possibilities of metropolitan anti-imperialism. His research examines the British left's debate over what was then known as "the problem of Palestine" during the years of the British Mandate for Palestine (1923-48), when British activists navigated for the first time the competing claims to their solidarity from both the Labor Zionist and Palestinian nationalist movements.

    In his teaching, Meade is interested in the broader dynamics of empire throughout history and around the world. At Stanford he has taught on British and Middle East history and has designed courses on empire and resistance in the modern Middle East. In addition to his teaching at Stanford, Meade is committed to public, community, and high school education, having volunteered in multiple capacities at Sequoia High School in Redwood City and worked for Stanford Online High School. He is also a multi-instrumentalist musician who loves to incorporate music and music history in the classroom.

  • Alison Grace Laurence

    Alison Grace Laurence

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioAlison Laurence is a Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education. She received her PhD from MIT’s interdisciplinary program in History, Anthropology, and Science, Technology, and Society (HASTS) in 2019. A cultural and environmental historian, she specializes in the historical study of nature on display, non-human animals, deep time, and extinction. Her current book manuscript--Of Dinosaurs and Culture Wars: A Monumental Reckoning with Modern American Monsters--traces how popular displays transformed dinosaurs and other creatures of deep time from scientific specimens to consumer objects and artifacts of everyday American life. Alison has published her research in Museum & Society, Notes & Records: The Royal Society Journal of the History of Science, and the Science Museum Group Journal. She holds a BA in Classics from Brown University and an MA in History and Public History from the University of New Orleans.

    At Stanford, Alison has taught special topics courses like "Animal Archives: History Beyond the Human" and a variety of courses within the first-year liberal education requirement, including: "Stories Everywhere," "100,000 Years of War," "Design That Understands Us," and "The Meat We Eat." During the 2022-2023 academic year, she is teaching "Why College?: Your Education and the Good Life," "Citizenship in the 21st Century," and "Preventing Human Extinction."

  • Sigrid Lupieri

    Sigrid Lupieri

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioSigrid Lupieri is a Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE). Previously, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation.

    Her current book project investigates how medical humanitarians value human life in a crisis. Focusing on the Syrian refugee crisis in Jordan, her research traces how security concerns, diplomatic efforts and notions of ‘deservingness’ influence who gets privileged access to medical care. Her work has been published in Social Science & Medicine, Global Social Policy, Forced Migration Review and Third World Quarterly.

    Sigrid received a Ph.D. in Development Studies from the University of Cambridge. She also holds an MPhil in Modern European History from the University of Cambridge, an M.S. in Journalism from Northwestern University, and a B.A. from the University of Udine (Italy). Outside of academia, she has worked for several years as a journalist in Armenia, Georgia, and Germany, and as a UN officer in New York and New Delhi.

  • Mejgan Massoumi

    Mejgan Massoumi

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioMejgan Massoumi received her Ph.D. in June of 2021 from the History Department at Stanford University. Her work and research explores Afghan engagement with a global communication technology, the radio, during a period of intense political reform and social transformations (1960-1979). Drawing on archives in Farsi, Pashto, Tajik, Urdu, and English, and a collection of oral histories from former Radio Afghanistan employees and other producers of music and art, her work offers a fresh perspective on Afghan history by considering the mobile and fluid international networks made possible through the producers and consumers of the radio and music in the twentieth century and the centrality of Afghan people to that story.

    Having earned previous degrees in Architecture (B.A.) and City Planning (M.C.P) from the University of California at Berkeley, the foundation of her scholarship is built upon a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspective. Her study of the past is informed through the study of sounds broadcast in and beyond the built environment.

    As a scholar and educator, and refugee and immigrant, Mejgan is committed to advancing a culture of equity and inclusion within academia through her activism and advocacy for diversity as well as her teaching and scholarship focused on the study of history through the experiences of marginalized peoples, places, and cultures.

    Mejgan's previous research explored how the dynamics of different forms of religious fundamentalisms are produced, represented and practiced in the city. The culmination of this research can be found in her co-edited book, The Fundamentalist City? Religiosity and the Remaking of Urban Space (Routledge, 2010). Another project that explored the multiple meanings of diversity, inclusion, and exclusion in fast-changing urban contexts resulted in the co-edited volume Urban Diversity: Space, Culture, and Inclusive Pluralism in Cities Worldwide (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010). Her master's research focused on race and inter-ethnic conflicts in post-9/11 Afghanistan, highlighting how humanitarian aid from the West contributed to deepening social and ethnic divides. She has also contributed articles to the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, Traditional Dwellings and Settlements Review, the International Journal of Islamic Architecture, and the Journal of International Affairs at Columbia University.

    During the 2021-2022 academic year, Mejgan is teaching "Why College?", "Design that Understands Us", and "Environmental Sustainability: Global Predicaments and Possible Solutions."

    During the 2022-2023 academic year, Mejgan is teaching "Why College?" and "Citizenship in the 21st Century."

  • Hope McCoy

    Hope McCoy

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioDr. McCoy is a Lecturer and Fellow in the Civic, Liberal, and Global Education program at Stanford University. McCoy’s research agenda focuses on the sociocultural dimensions of development studies, with an emphasis on education, public health, and the role of cultural diplomacy in geopolitics.

    Dr. McCoy's first book (2023) entitled: "From Congo to GONGO: Higher Education, Critical Geopolitics, and the New Red Scare" is one of the winners of an Emerging Scholars Competition in Black Studies. With a focus on Africa and Russia, this book traces the history of contact between the two regions. During each time period—education, political science, history, and Black studies are woven together, each era with shifting values and purposes that influence foreign relations between Africa and Eurasia.

    A Fulbright scholar (2015-2016, Russia) with multidisciplinary expertise, McCoy has also worked as a research strategist at Harvard University on projects related to racial justice, equity, and inclusion. Dr. McCoy earned a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Northwestern University and a master’s degree and Ph.D. from UCLA in Education.

  • Tanya Schmidt Morstein

    Tanya Schmidt Morstein

    SLE Lecturer

    BioTanya Schmidt Morstein is a Lecturer for Structured Liberal Education (SLE). She graduated from Santa Clara University with a BA in English and minors in Classical Studies and Religious Studies, and she earned her MA and PhD in English from New York University in 2022. From 2022-23, Tanya held an appointment as a Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in The College Core Curriculum at NYU, where she was recognized with the university-wide prize for Outstanding Teaching. Tanya has taught a range of writing and humanities courses such as on Shakespeare, Austen, and utopian fiction.

    Tanya specializes in the literature and culture of the English Renaissance, and her research interests include classical reception, women’s writing, and intersections between literature and science. Her work on Spenser was awarded the Spenser Society’s Anne Lake Prescott Graduate Student Conference Paper Prize, and she also served as the graduate student representative on the executive committee for the international Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and Gender. Tanya’s research has been supported by NYU’s Global Research Institute in Florence, the Remarque Institute, the Folger Shakespeare Library, and the Huntington Library, among others. She is currently working on a book project about the early modern imagination.