Honors & Awards


  • Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Fellowship, Stanford University (2014)
  • Outstanding Achievement Award for High Impact Paper, Hopkins Marine Station (2014-2015)

Education & Certifications


  • Master of Science, Oregon State University, Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (2014)
  • Master of Arts, Stanford University, ED-MA (2005)
  • Bachelor of Arts, Brown University, Mathematics (2002)

All Publications


  • Hydrodynamic properties of fin whale flippers predict maximum rolling performance. journal of experimental biology Segre, P. S., Cade, D. E., Fish, F. E., Potvin, J., Allen, A. N., Calambokidis, J., Friedlaender, A. S., Goldbogen, J. A. 2016; 219: 3315-3320

    Abstract

    Maneuverability is one of the most important and least understood aspects of animal locomotion. The hydrofoil-like flippers of cetaceans are thought to function as control surfaces that effect maneuvers, but quantitative tests of this hypothesis have been lacking. Here, we constructed a simple hydrodynamic model to predict the longitudinal-axis roll performance of fin whales, and we tested its predictions against kinematic data recorded by on-board movement sensors from 27 free-swimming fin whales. We found that for a given swimming speed and roll excursion, the roll velocity of fin whales calculated from our field data agrees well with that predicted by our hydrodynamic model. Although fluke and body torsion may further influence performance, our results indicate that lift generated by the flippers is sufficient to drive most of the longitudinal-axis rolls used by fin whales for feeding and maneuvering.

    View details for PubMedID 27591304

  • Kinematic Diversity in Rorqual Whale Feeding Mechanisms CURRENT BIOLOGY Cade, D. E., Friedlaender, A. S., Calambokidis, J., Goldbogen, J. A. 2016; 26 (19): 2617-2624

    Abstract

    Rorqual whales exhibit an extreme lunge filter-feeding strategy characterized by acceleration to high speed and engulfment of a large volume of prey-laden water [1-4]. Although tagging studies have quantified the kinematics of lunge feeding, the timing of engulfment relative to body acceleration has been modeled conflictingly because it could never be directly measured [5-7]. The temporal coordination of these processes has a major impact on the hydrodynamics and energetics of this high-cost feeding strategy [5-9]. If engulfment and body acceleration are temporally distinct, the overall cost of this dynamic feeding event would be minimized. However, greater temporal overlap of these two phases would theoretically result in higher drag and greater energetic costs. To address this discrepancy, we used animal-borne synchronized video and 3D movement sensors to quantify the kinematics of both the skull and body during feeding events. Krill-feeding blue and humpback whales exhibited temporally distinct acceleration and engulfment phases, with humpback whales reaching maximum gape earlier than blue whales. In these whales, engulfment coincided largely with body deceleration; however, humpback whales pursuing more agile fish demonstrated highly variable coordination of skull and body kinematics in the context of complex prey-herding techniques. These data suggest that rorquals modulate the coordination of acceleration and engulfment to optimize foraging efficiency by minimizing locomotor costs and maximizing prey capture. Moreover, this newfound kinematic diversity observed among rorquals indicates that the energetic efficiency of foraging is driven both by the whale's engulfment capacity and the comparative locomotor capabilities of predator and prey. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2016.07.037

    View details for Web of Science ID 000385690800022

    View details for PubMedID 27666966

  • Depths, migration rates and environmental associations of acoustic scattering layers in the Gulf of California DEEP-SEA RESEARCH PART I-OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH PAPERS Cade, D. E., Benoit-Bird, K. J. 2015; 102: 78-89
  • An automatic and quantitative approach to the detection and tracking of acoustic scattering layers LIMNOLOGY AND OCEANOGRAPHY-METHODS Cade, D. E., Benoit-Bird, K. J. 2014; 12: 742-756