Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Ralph & Claire Landau Visiting Professor of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (2008 - 2008)
  • Visiting Professor of Mathematics, University of the West Indies (1995 - 1995)
  • Dean, School of Humanities & Sciences, Stanford University (1988 - 1993)
  • Associate Dean, School of Humanities & Sciences, Stanford University (1986 - 1988)
  • Chairman, Department of Psychology, Stanford University (1983 - 1986)
  • Visiting Professor of Mathematics, University of Guyana (1977 - 1977)
  • Professor of Psychology, Stanford University (1975 - Present)
  • Associate Professor of Psychology, Stanford University (1973 - 1975)
  • Visiting Associate Professor of Psychology, Stanford University (1972 - 1973)
  • Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Michigan (1971 - 1972)
  • Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of Michigan (1970 - 1971)
  • Honorary Research Assistant, Department of Psychology, University College London (1967 - 1970)

Honors & Awards


  • Fellow, John Simon Guggenheim Foundation (1976-1977)
  • Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California (1979-1980)
  • University Fellow, Stanford University (1982-1984)
  • Distinguished Teaching Award, Associated Students of Stanford University (ASSU) (2002)
  • Bass University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, Stanford University (2013)
  • Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching, School of Humanities & Sciences (2016)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Chair, Ad Hoc Committee of the Academic Senate on Reserve Officer Training Corps programs, Stanford University (2010 - 2011)
  • Member, Judicial Affairs Panel (2005 - 2007)
  • Member of the Vice-Chancellor’s Ad Hoc Committee to investigate ethnic and gender discrimination, St. Augustine campus, University of the West Indies (2005 - 2005)
  • Chair, Committee on Undergraduate Standards & Policy of the Academic Senate, Stanford University (2002 - 2004)
  • Chair, Committee on Committees of the Academic Senate, Stanford University (1998 - 2000)
  • Member of the Academic Senate, Stanford University (1998 - 2000)
  • Member of the Selection Committee, Alan T. Waterman Award, National Academy of Sciences (1994 - 1996)
  • Member of the Advisory Committee, Office of Science and Engineering Personnel, National Research Council (1993 - 1998)
  • Member of the Board on Testing and Assessment, National Research Council (1993 - 1997)
  • Member of the Chancellor's Review Commission, University of Guyana (1991 - 1991)
  • Member of Editorial Board, Psychological Bulletin (1987 - 1989)
  • Consulting Editor, Psychological Review (1985 - 1990)
  • Member of various Fellowship and Review Committees, National Institute of Mental Health (1972 - Present)
  • Member of various Fellowship and Review Committees, National Science Foundation (1972 - Present)
  • Member of various Fellowship and Review Committees, National Institute of Education (1972 - Present)

Professional Education


  • L.L.D. (Hon.), University of the West Indies, Jamaica (1989)
  • Ph.D., University of Cambridge, England, Statistics (1967)
  • B.Sc., University of the West Indies, Jamaica, Mathematics (1963)

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Theoretical and experimental analyses of information processing, equity, and of small-group processes; statistical methods.

All Publications


  • Neighborhood effects on use of African-American Vernacular English. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Rickford, J. R., Duncan, G. J., Gennetian, L. A., Gou, R. Y., Greene, R., Katz, L. F., Kessler, R. C., Kling, J. R., Sanbonmatsu, L., Sanchez-Ordoñez, A. E., Sciandra, M., Thomas, E., Ludwig, J. 2015; 112 (38): 11817-11822

    Abstract

    African-American Vernacular English (AAVE) is systematic, rooted in history, and important as an identity marker and expressive resource for its speakers. In these respects, it resembles other vernacular or nonstandard varieties, like Cockney or Appalachian English. But like them, AAVE can trigger discrimination in the workplace, housing market, and schools. Understanding what shapes the relative use of AAVE vs. Standard American English (SAE) is important for policy and scientific reasons. This work presents, to our knowledge, the first experimental estimates of the effects of moving into lower-poverty neighborhoods on AAVE use. We use data on non-Hispanic African-American youth (n = 629) from a large-scale, randomized residential mobility experiment called Moving to Opportunity (MTO), which enrolled a sample of mostly minority families originally living in distressed public housing. Audio recordings of the youth were transcribed and coded for the use of five grammatical and five phonological AAVE features to construct a measure of the proportion of possible instances, or tokens, in which speakers use AAVE rather than SAE speech features. Random assignment to receive a housing voucher to move into a lower-poverty area (the intention-to-treat effect) led youth to live in neighborhoods (census tracts) with an 11 percentage point lower poverty rate on average over the next 10-15 y and reduced the share of AAVE tokens by ∼3 percentage points compared with the MTO control group youth. The MTO effect on AAVE use equals approximately half of the difference in AAVE frequency observed between youth whose parents have a high school diploma and those whose parents do not.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1500176112

    View details for PubMedID 26351663

  • Neighborhood effects on use of African-American Vernacular English PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Rickford, J. R., Duncan, G. J., Gennetian, L. A., Gou, R. Y., Greene, R., Katz, L. F., Kessier, R. C., Kling, J. R., Sanbonmatsu, L., Sanchez-Ordonez, A. E., Sciandra, M., Thomas, E., Ludwig, J. 2015; 112 (38): 11817-11822
  • A Little CFTR Goes a Long Way: CFTR-Dependent Sweat Secretion from G551D and R117H-5T Cystic Fibrosis Subjects Taking Ivacaftor PLOS ONE Char, J. E., Wolfe, M. H., Cho, H., Park, I., Jeong, J. H., Frisbee, E., Dunn, C., Davies, Z., Milla, C., Moss, R. B., Thomas, E. A., Wine, J. J. 2014; 9 (2)
  • Choosing a Physician Depends on How You Want to Feel: The Role of Ideal Affect in Health-Related Decision Making EMOTION Sims, T., Tsai, J. L., Koopmann-Holm, B., Thomas, E. A., Goldstein, M. K. 2014; 14 (1): 187-192

    Abstract

    When given a choice, how do people decide which physician to select? Although significant research has demonstrated that how people actually feel (their "actual affect") influences their health care preferences, how people ideally want to feel (their "ideal affect") may play an even greater role. Specifically, we predicted that people trust physicians whose affective characteristics match their ideal affect, which leads people to prefer those physicians more. Consistent with this prediction, the more participants wanted to feel high arousal positive states on average (ideal HAP; e.g., excited), the more likely they were to select a HAP-focused physician. Similarly, the more people wanted to feel low arousal positive states on average (ideal LAP; e.g., calm), the more likely they were to select a LAP-focused physician. Also as predicted, these links were mediated by perceived physician trustworthiness. Notably, while participants' ideal affect predicted physician preference, actual affect (how much people actually felt HAP and LAP on average) did not. These findings suggest that people base serious decisions on how they want to feel, and highlight the importance of considering ideal affect in models of decision making preferences. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

    View details for DOI 10.1037/a0034372

    View details for Web of Science ID 000330877700020

  • A little CFTR goes a long way: CFTR-dependent sweat secretion from G551D and R117H-5T cystic fibrosis subjects taking ivacaftor. PloS one Char, J. E., Wolfe, M. H., Cho, H., Park, I., Jeong, J. H., Frisbee, E., Dunn, C., Davies, Z., Milla, C., Moss, R. B., Thomas, E. A., Wine, J. J. 2014; 9 (2)

    Abstract

    To determine if oral dosing with the CFTR-potentiator ivacaftor (VX-770, Kalydeco) improves CFTR-dependent sweating in CF subjects carrying G551D or R117H-5T mutations, we optically measured sweat secretion from 32-143 individually identified glands in each of 8 CF subjects; 6 F508del/G551D, one G551D/R117H-5T, and one I507del/R117H-5T. Two subjects were tested only (-) ivacaftor, 3 only (+) ivacaftor and 3 (+/-) ivacaftor (1-5 tests per condition). The total number of gland measurements was 852 (-) ivacaftor and 906 (+) ivacaftor. A healthy control was tested 4 times (51 glands). For each gland we measured both CFTR-independent (M-sweat) and CFTR-dependent (C-sweat); C-sweat was stimulated with a β-adrenergic cocktail that elevated [cAMP]i while blocking muscarinic receptors. Absent ivacaftor, almost all CF glands produced M-sweat on all tests, but only 1/593 glands produced C-sweat (10 tests, 5 subjects). By contrast, 6/6 subjects (113/342 glands) produced C-sweat in the (+) ivacaftor condition, but with large inter-subject differences; 3-74% of glands responded with C/M sweat ratios 0.04%-2.57% of the average WT ratio of 0.265. Sweat volume losses cause proportionally larger underestimates of CFTR function at lower sweat rates. The losses were reduced by measuring C/M ratios in 12 glands from each subject that had the highest M-sweat rates. Remaining losses were estimated from single channel data and used to correct the C/M ratios, giving estimates of CFTR function (+) ivacaftor  = 1.6%-7.7% of the WT average. These estimates are in accord with single channel data and transcript analysis, and suggest that significant clinical benefit can be produced by low levels of CFTR function.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0088564

    View details for PubMedID 24520399

  • In Vivo Readout of CFTR Function: Ratiometric Measurement of CFTR-Dependent Secretion by Individual, Identifiable Human Sweat Glands PLOS ONE Wine, J. J., Char, J. E., Chen, J., Cho, H., Dunn, C., Frisbee, E., Joo, N. S., Milla, C., Modlin, S. E., Park, I., Thomas, E. A., Tran, K. V., Verma, R., Wolfe, M. H. 2013; 8 (10)
  • In vivo readout of CFTR function: ratiometric measurement of CFTR-dependent secretion by individual, identifiable human sweat glands. PloS one Wine, J. J., Char, J. E., Chen, J., Cho, H., Dunn, C., Frisbee, E., Joo, N. S., Milla, C., Modlin, S. E., Park, I., Thomas, E. A., Tran, K. V., Verma, R., Wolfe, M. H. 2013; 8 (10)

    Abstract

    To assess CFTR function in vivo, we developed a bioassay that monitors and compares CFTR-dependent and CFTR-independent sweat secretion in parallel for multiple (∼50) individual, identified glands in each subject. Sweating was stimulated by intradermally injected agonists and quantified by optically measuring spherical sweat bubbles in an oil-layer that contained dispersed, water soluble dye particles that partitioned into the sweat bubbles, making them highly visible. CFTR-independent secretion (M-sweat) was stimulated with methacholine, which binds to muscarinic receptors and elevates cytosolic calcium. CFTR-dependent secretion (C-sweat) was stimulated with a β-adrenergic cocktail that elevates cytosolic cAMP while blocking muscarinic receptors. A C-sweat/M-sweat ratio was determined on a gland-by-gland basis to compensate for differences unrelated to CFTR function, such as gland size. The average ratio provides an approximately linear readout of CFTR function: the heterozygote ratio is ∼0.5 the control ratio and for CF subjects the ratio is zero. During assay development, we measured C/M ratios in 6 healthy controls, 4 CF heterozygotes, 18 CF subjects and 4 subjects with 'CFTR-related' conditions. The assay discriminated all groups clearly. It also revealed consistent differences in the C/M ratio among subjects within groups. We hypothesize that these differences reflect, at least in part, levels of CFTR expression, which are known to vary widely. When C-sweat rates become very low the C/M ratio also tended to decrease; we hypothesize that this nonlinearity reflects ductal fluid absorption. We also discovered that M-sweating potentiates the subsequent C-sweat response. We then used potentiation as a surrogate for drugs that can increase CFTR-dependent secretion. This bioassay provides an additional method for assessing CFTR function in vivo, and is well suited for within-subject tests of systemic, CFTR-directed therapeutics.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0077114

    View details for PubMedID 24204751

  • CHOLINERGIC POTENTIATION OF CFTR-DEPENDENT SECRETION BY INDIVIDUAL, IDENTIFIABLE SWEAT GLANDS Wine, J., Chen, J., Modlin, S., Tran, K., Kennedy, M. H., Verma, R., Joo, N., Frisbee, E., THOMAS, E. A., Cho, H. WILEY-BLACKWELL. 2012: 299-299
  • Comparing the Eyes Depicted in Japanese Portraits of Beautiful Women: The Meiji and Modern Periods AESTHETIC PLASTIC SURGERY Lee, J. J., Thomas, E. 2012; 36 (3): 504-510

    Abstract

    The women portrayed in the bijin-ga of the past, particularly those from the Meiji Period (1868–1912), tended not to show much resemblance to those of women portrayed in the more modern bijin-ga (from after World War II), and such an observation came across as a possible indication that Japanese standards of beauty have changed over the two eras. To examine whether the apparent discrepancy can be interpreted as an actual change in the standards or not, a study was designed with the aim of assigning numeric values to several aspects of the eyes and testing for the presence of a statistically significant difference in each of the aspects between the Meiji bijin-ga and the modern bijin-ga.For this study, 29 Meiji bijin-ga and 36 modern bijin-ga were selected. The eye was chosen as the subject of comparison, and five aspects were categorized and measured: (1) presence or absence of a double fold, (2) eye width, (3) eye height, (4) eyebrow-to-upper lid distance, and (D) corneal diameter. The eye width, the eye height, and the eyebrow-to-upper lid distance were divided by the corneal diameter to derive standardized grounds for comparison.The difference in double-fold frequencies between the Meiji bijin-ga (24%) and the modern bijin-ga (36%) was not found to be statistically significant (p=0.298). There was no difference in the eye width-to-corneal diameter ratio between the Meiji bijin-ga (mean 2.57±0.6) and the modern bijin-ga (mean 2.61±0.85) (p=0.86). The eye height-to-corneal diameter ratio derived from the Meiji bijin-ga (mean 0.62±0.15) was significantly smaller than that derived from the modern bijin-ga (mean 0.82±0.18) (p=0.000). The eyebrow to upper lid distance-to-corneal diameter ratio derived from the Meiji bijin-ga (mean 2.21±0.83) was significantly greater than that derived from the modern bijin-ga (mean 1.36±0.78) (p=0.000).The results of the study support the notion that Westernization contributed to bringing about changes in the Japanese standards of beautiful eyes in the context of bijin-ga. However, the fact that the changeover has not occurred in all the categories in question does not indicate that the Occidental characteristics came to be emulated in their entirety. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE V: This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors at http://www.springer.com/00266.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s00266-011-9857-y

    View details for Web of Science ID 000304203800004

    View details for PubMedID 22302188

  • Studying Teacher Effectiveness: The Challenges of Developing Valid Measures The SAGE Handbook of Measurement Darling-Hammond, L., Dieckmann, J., Haertel, E., Lotan, R., Newton, X., Philipose, S., Spang, E., Thomas, E., Williamson, P. edited by Walford, G., Tucker, E. Sage Publications Ltd. 2010
  • Value-Added Modeling of Teacher Effectiveness: An Exploration of Stability across Models and Contexts Educational Policy Analysis Archives Newton, X. A., Darling-Hammond, L., Haeertel, E., Thomas, E. 2010; 18 (23)
  • YOU'RE AS YOUNG AS YOU WANT TO FEEL: CULTURAL VARIATION IN IDEAL AFFECT ACROSS THE LIFESPAN Tsai, J. L., THOMAS, E. A., Sims, T., PARK, C., Hong, J., Fung, H. OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. 2009: 237-237
  • Mathematical and Empirical Studies of English/Creole Language Variation Proceedings of the 16th Caribbean Academy of Sciences Biennial Conference on Science and Technology: Vehicles for Sustainable Economic Development in the Caribbean Thomas, E. A., Devonish, H. Grenada, West Indies.. 2008: 1-19; 11-13
  • Group differences in fairness perceptions and decision making in voting rights cases LAW AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR Cole, A. P., Thomas, E. A. 2006; 30 (5): 543-560

    Abstract

    Participants recruited from one Historically Black University (HBU) and two predominantly White higher-education institutions evaluated and decided simulated voting rights case summaries in which the plaintiff was either a racially-defined (African American) or a nonracially-defined (farmers) minority group. Contrary to social identity and social justice findings of an in-group bias, the present study showed greater support at all institutions for the voting rights of the African Americans than for the rural farmers, and the greatest support for both minority groups was found at the HBU. Perceived evidence strength was a better predictor of decisions than perceived unfairness, and both of these predictor variables completely mediated the effects of institution-type and involvement of a racially-defined group on decisions.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10979-006-9046-8

    View details for Web of Science ID 000241560400001

    View details for PubMedID 17019616

  • Congener Development in Jamaican Rum over an Aging Period of Three Years Journal of Science and Technology Thomas, E. A., Jackson, Y. A., Thompson, I. L. 1995; 6: 30-51
  • DISTRIBUTIONAL ASSUMPTIONS AND OBSERVED CONSERVATISM IN THE THEORY OF SIGNAL DETECTABILITY JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICAL PSYCHOLOGY Maloney, L. T., THOMAS, E. A. 1991; 35 (4): 443-470
  • BEHAVIOR-DEPENDENT CONTEXTS FOR REPEATED PLAYS OF THE PRISONERS-DILEMMA JOURNAL OF CONFLICT RESOLUTION THOMAS, E. A., Feldman, M. W. 1988; 32 (4): 699-726
  • ON THE ROLE OF PATCH DENSITY AND PATCH VARIABILITY IN CENTRAL-PLACE FORAGING THEORETICAL POPULATION BIOLOGY THOMAS, E. A. 1988; 34 (3): 266-278
  • LIABILITY AS A FUNCTION OF PLAINTIFF AND DEFENDANT FAULT JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY THOMAS, E. A., Parpal, M. 1987; 53 (5): 843-857
  • BEHAVIOR-DEPENDENT CONTEXTS FOR REPEATED PLAYS OF THE PRISONERS-DILEMMA .2. DYNAMIC ASPECTS OF THE EVOLUTION OF COOPERATION JOURNAL OF THEORETICAL BIOLOGY Feldman, M. W., THOMAS, E. A. 1987; 128 (3): 297-315

    Abstract

    Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma models are proposed in which, at any trial, the probability of staying in the game depends on the outcome of the previous trial. If a player's choice depends on its own play (cooperate or defect) at the previous trial, it becomes possible for cooperative strategies to increase when rare in a population of egoists. A dynamic analysis is used to demonstrate that stable polymorphisms may result, and may involve more strategies than just Tit-for-Tat and all-Defect. The tendency for clustering among like strategists to enhance their initial increase when rare is also explored dynamically.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1987K544600004

    View details for PubMedID 3444341

  • ON CALCULATING OPTIMAL CONTRIBUTORY NEGLIGENCE RULES SOCIAL CHOICE AND WELFARE THOMAS, E. A. 1985; 2 (1): 65-85
  • ANTICIPATORY AND FANTASTIC ROLE ENACTMENT IN PRESCHOOL TRIADS DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY MCLOYD, V. C., Warren, D., THOMAS, E. A. 1984; 20 (5): 807-814
  • THE SHORT-TERM DYNAMICS OF SOCIAL-ORGANIZATION IN PRESCHOOL TRIADS CHILD DEVELOPMENT MCLOYD, V. C., THOMAS, E. A., Warren, D. 1984; 55 (3): 1051-1070

    Abstract

    Sequential dependencies in solitary and interactive states of social organization were examined as a function of age, sex, and type of toy in 12 triads of 3 1/2- and 5-year-old children. Each triad was observed during 2 30-min sessions, one in which objects with highly specific functions (e.g., dolls, trucks) were available, and one in which objects with relatively ambiguous functions (e.g., pipe cleaners, cardboard cylinders) were present. The results indicated that, while old and young triads did not differ in the tendency to initiate triadic interaction when the preceding state was solitary, old triads were more likely than young triads to maintain the triadic state and to shift to that state from the dyadic state. Boy triads were more likely than girl triads to remain in a solitary state and less likely to shift to and remain in a dyadic state, though no sex difference was found in the transition probabilities when the preceding state was triadic. Triads were more likely to remain in a solitary state in the presence of high-specificity toys than in the presence of low-specificity toys. Verbal metacommunication was more frequent among old triads than young triads, and it facilitated maintenance, but not initiation, of interactive states. The distinction between initiation and maintenance tendencies was formalized in a Markov model of the dynamics of social organization, and the parameter estimates yielded by the model were used to provide a simplified description of the "main" effects of age, sex, and type of toy. It is argued that models such as this one are useful in circumventing certain restrictions on the possible interpretations of raw sequential statistics.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1984SW27900037

    View details for PubMedID 6734306

  • NOTES ON EFFORT AND ACHIEVEMENT-ORIENTED BEHAVIOR PSYCHOLOGICAL REVIEW THOMAS, E. A. 1983; 90 (1): 1-20

    View details for Web of Science ID A1983QF23100001

    View details for PubMedID 6844476

  • THE INFLUENCE OF OWN AND OTHER OUTCOME ON SATISFACTION AND CHOICE OF TASK-DIFFICULTY ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE THOMAS, E. A., Ward, W. E. 1983; 32 (3): 399-416
  • PROCESSING INSTRUCTIONS, MARKEDNESS, AND CONGRUITY EFFECTS IN A SENTENCE VERIFICATION TASK JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-HUMAN PERCEPTION AND PERFORMANCE THOMAS, E. A., Hemenway, K. 1981; 7 (3): 701-718
  • Effort and optimality in the new Soviet incentive model Economics of Planning Thomas, E. A. 1981; 17: 23-36
  • ON APPROPRIATE PROCEDURES FOR COMBINING PROBABILITY-DISTRIBUTIONS WITHIN THE SAME FAMILY JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICAL PSYCHOLOGY THOMAS, E. A., Ross, B. H. 1980; 21 (2): 136-152
  • DYNAMICS OF 2-PERSON INTERACTIONS PSYCHOLOGICAL REVIEW THOMAS, E. A., Malone, T. W. 1979; 86 (4): 331-360
  • Interdependence between the processing of temporal and non-temporal information Attention and Performance VII Thomas, E. A., Cantor, N. E. edited by Requin, J. Hillsdale: Erlbaum. 1979
  • An analysis of mother-child interaction Research Directions of Black Psychologists. Thomas, E. A. edited by Boykin, A. W., Franklin, A. J., Yates, J. F. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. 1979
  • Bias and discriminability in group performance Research Directions of Black Psychologists Thomas, E. A. edited by Boykin, A. W., Fraklin, A. J., Yates, J. F. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. 1979
  • EFFECT OF LEVEL OF CONFUSABILITY ON REPORTING LETTERS FROM BRIEFLY PRESENTED VISUAL-DISPLAYS PERCEPTION & PSYCHOPHYSICS Krumhansl, C. L., THOMAS, E. A. 1977; 21 (3): 269-279
  • CONTROL OF ATTENTION IN PROCESSING OF TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL INFORMATION IN COMPLEX VISUAL-PATTERNS JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-HUMAN PERCEPTION AND PERFORMANCE CANTOR, N. E., THOMAS, E. A. 1977; 3 (2): 243-250

    Abstract

    Eighteen stimuli were created by orthogonally varying the area (A), perimeter (P), and exposure duration of checkerboard patterns. Subjects judged either the area and duration of the presented shapes (area-time group) or the perimeter and duration (perimeter-time group) of the same figures. Perceived duration, area, and perimeter varied with changes in the uninstructed an the instructed stimulus dimensions. The discussion focuses on the ability of subjects to control the allocation of attention to instructed stimulus dimensions, as well as on the evidence in the data in favor of detailed sequential or fast holistic processing. It is suggested that the concept of stimulus complexity, defined as P2/A, is useful in describing the temporal and spatial illusions obtained in this study.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1977DD33200007

    View details for PubMedID 864396

  • ANALYSES OF PARENT-INFANT INTERACTION PSYCHOLOGICAL REVIEW THOMAS, E. A., Martin, J. A. 1976; 83 (2): 141-156
  • APPARENT WEIGHT OF EVIDENCE, DECISION CRITERIA, AND CONFIDENCE RATINGS IN JUROR DECISION-MAKING PSYCHOLOGICAL REVIEW THOMAS, E. A., Hogue, A. 1976; 83 (6): 442-465
  • FACILITY LOCATION WITH CHANGING DEMAND LEVELS GEOGRAPHICAL ANALYSIS Davies, O., THOMAS, E. A. 1976; 8 (4): 376-394
  • VISUAL MASKING EFFECTS ON DURATION, SIZE, AND FORM DISCRIMINATION PERCEPTION & PSYCHOPHYSICS CANTOR, N. E., THOMAS, E. A. 1976; 19 (4): 321-327
  • EXTRACTING IDENTITY AND LOCATION INFORMATION FROM BRIEFLY PRESENTED LETTER ARRAYS PERCEPTION & PSYCHOPHYSICS Krumhansl, C. L., THOMAS, E. A. 1976; 20 (4): 243-258
  • SIMULTANEOUS TIME AND SIZE PERCEPTION PERCEPTION & PSYCHOPHYSICS THOMAS, E. A., CANTOR, N. E. 1976; 19 (4): 353-360
  • TECHNOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF WAGE-PROFIT FRONTIER JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC THEORY THOMAS, E. A. 1975; 11 (2): 263-282
  • CRITERION ADJUSTMENT AND PROBABILITY MATCHING PERCEPTION & PSYCHOPHYSICS Thomas, E. C. 1975; 18 (2): 158-162
  • COGNITIVE PROCESSING AND TIME PERCEPTION PERCEPTION & PSYCHOPHYSICS THOMAS, E. A., Weaver, W. B. 1975; 17 (4): 363-367
  • SPATIAL DEMAND MODELS WITH UNIFORM RATE OF GROWTH ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING A THOMAS, E. A., Davies, O. 1975; 7 (5): 589-599
  • DUALITY OF SIMULTANEOUS TIME AND SIZE PERCEPTION PERCEPTION & PSYCHOPHYSICS THOMAS, E. A., CANTOR, N. E. 1975; 18 (1): 44-48
  • NOTE ON SEQUENTIAL PROBABILITY RATIO TEST PSYCHOMETRIKA THOMAS, E. A. 1975; 40 (1): 107-111
  • SELECTIVITY OF PREPARATION PSYCHOLOGICAL REVIEW THOMAS, E. A. 1974; 81 (5): 442-464
  • TIME PERCEPTION AND FILLED-DURATION ILLUSION PERCEPTION & PSYCHOPHYSICS THOMAS, E. A., Brown, I. 1974; 16 (3): 449-458
  • CLASS OF ADDITIVE LEARNING MODELS - ERROR-CORRECTING AND PROBABILITY MATCHING JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICAL PSYCHOLOGY THOMAS, E. A. 1973; 10 (3): 241-264
  • An analysis of the effects of group discussion on individual risk preferences Journal of Personality and Social Psychology Thomas, E. A., Farr, R. M., Gaskell, G. D. 1973; 25: 192-198
  • On expectancy and the speed and accuracy of responses Attention and Performance IV Thomas, E. A. edited by Komblum, S. New York: Academic Press. 1973: 613-626
  • IMPLICATIONS OF LATENCY DATA FOR THRESHOLD AND NONTHRESHOLD MODELS OF SIGNAL DETECTION JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICAL PSYCHOLOGY THOMAS, E. A., Myers, J. L. 1972; 9 (3): 253-?
  • SUFFICIENT CONDITIONS FOR MONOTONE HAZARD RATE AN APPLICATION TO LATENCY-PROBABILITY CURVES JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICAL PSYCHOLOGY THOMAS, E. A. 1971; 8 (3): 303-?
  • A MODEL FOR SUBJECTIVE GROUPING IN TYPEWRITING QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY THOMAS, E. A., Jones, R. G. 1970; 22: 353-?
  • PROBABILITY MATCHING AS A BASIS FOR DETECTION AND RECOGNITION DECISIONS PSYCHOLOGICAL REVIEW THOMAS, E. A., Legge, D. 1970; 77 (1): 65-72
  • PREPARATION IN SIMPLE REACTION TASKS BULLETIN OF THE BRITISH PSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY THOMAS, E. A. 1970; 23 (80): 241-242
  • ON EXPECTANCY AND AVERAGE REACTION TIME BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY THOMAS, E. A. 1970; 61 (1): 33-?
  • DISTRIBUTION FREE TESTS FOR MIXED PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS BIOMETRIKA THOMAS, E. A. 1969; 56 (3): 475-?
  • ALTERNATIVE MODELS FOR INFORMATION PROCESSING-CONSTRUCTING NON-PARAMETRIC TESTS BRITISH JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICAL & STATISTICAL PSYCHOLOGY THOMAS, E. A. 1969; 22: 105-?
  • REACTION-TIME STUDIES - ANTICIPATION AND INTERACTION OF RESPONSES BRITISH JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICAL & STATISTICAL PSYCHOLOGY THOMAS, E. A. 1967; 20: 1-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A19679852100001

    View details for PubMedID 6073862

  • AN OPTIMUM INTERVAL IN ASSESSMENT OF PAIN THRESHOLD QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Haslam, D. R., THOMAS, E. A. 1967; 19: 54-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A19678937900007

    View details for PubMedID 6041683

  • ON DETERMINING PAIN THRESHOLDS USING LIMITING METHOD QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY THOMAS, E. A. 1966; 18: 270-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A19668190000011

    View details for PubMedID 5947483

  • Mathematical models for the clustered firing of single cortical neurons British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology Thomas, E. A. 1966; 19: 151-162