Clinical Focus


  • Psychiatry

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry (2013)
  • Medical Education: Aga Khan University Medical College (2005) Pakistan
  • Board Certification: American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Psychosomatic Medicine (2013)
  • Fellowship: New York Presbyterian Hospital - Columbia University (2012) NY
  • Board Certification: American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Psychiatry (2011)
  • Residency: Mayo Clinic School of Medicine (2011) MN

All Publications


  • Cannabinoids and solid organ transplantation: Psychiatric perspectives and recommendations. Transplantation reviews (Orlando, Fla.) Winder, G. S., Andrews, S. R., Banerjee, A. G., Hussain, F., Ivkovic, A., Kuntz, K., Omary, L., Shenoy, A., Thant, T., VandenBerg, A., Zimbrean, P. 2022; 36 (4): 100715

    Abstract

    Cannabinoid use in patients seeking solid organ transplantation (SOT) is an important and unsettled matter which all transplantation clinicians regularly encounter. It is also a multifaceted, interprofessional issue, difficult for any specialty alone to adequately address in a research article or during clinical care. Such uncertainty lends itself to bias for or against cannabinoid use accompanied by inconsistent policies and procedures. Scientific literature in SOT regarding cannabinoids often narrowly examines the issue and exists mostly in liver and kidney transplantation. Published recommendations from professional societies are mosaics of vagueness and specificity mirroring the ongoing dilemma. The cannabinoid information SOT clinicians need for clinical care may require data and perspectives from diverse medical literature which are rarely synthesized. SOT teams may not be adequately staffed or trained to address various neuropsychiatric cannabinoid effects and risks in patients. In this article, authors from US transplantation centers conduct a systematized review of the few existing studies regarding clinician perceptions, use rates, and clinical impact of cannabinoid use in SOT patients; collate representative professional society guidance on the topic; draw from diverse medical literature bases to detail facets of cannabinoid use in psychiatry and addiction pertinent to all transplantation clinicians; provide basic clinical and policy recommendations; and indicate areas of future study.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.trre.2022.100715

    View details for PubMedID 35853383

  • Substance use screening in transplant populations: Recommendations from a consensus workgroup. Transplantation reviews (Orlando, Fla.) Jowsey-Gregoire, S., Jannetto, P. J., Jesse, M. T., Fleming, J., Winder, G. S., Balliet, W., Kuntz, K., Vasquez, A., Weinland, S., Hussain, F., Weinrieb, R., Fireman, M., Nickels, M. W., Peipert, J. D., Thomas, C., Zimbrean, P. C. 2022; 36 (2): 100694

    Abstract

    Transplant patients are frequently treated with substances that have dependence potential and/or they may have a history of substance use disorders. The Psychosocial and Ethics Community of Practice of the American Society of Transplantation formed a Drug Testing Workgroup with participation from members of the Pharmacy Community of Practice and members of the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry. The workgroup reviewed the literature regarding the following issues: the role of drug testing in patients with substance use disorders, for patients prescribed controlled substances, legal, ethical and prescription drug monitoring issues, financial and insurance issues, and which patients should be tested. We also reviewed current laboratory testing for substances. Group discussions to develop a consensus occurred, and summaries of each topic were reviewed. The workgroup recommends that transplant patients be informed of drug testing and be screened for substances prior to transplant to ensure optimal care and implement ongoing testing if warranted by clinical history. While use of certain substances may not result in the exclusion for transplantation, an awareness of the patient's practices and possible risk from substances is necessary, allowing transplant teams to screen for substance use disorders and ensure the patient is able to manage and minimize risks post-transplant.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.trre.2022.100694

    View details for PubMedID 35537285

  • PSYCHOSOCIAL PREDICTORS OF ALCOHOL RELAPSE AMONG LIVER TRANSPLANT CANDIDATES WITH ALCOHOL-RELATED LIVER DISEASE Sedki, M., Kwo, P., Ahmed, A., Hussain, F., Kwong, A. J., Goel, A. WILEY. 2021: 246A-247A
  • STANFORD INTEGRATED PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT FOR TRANSPLANT (SIPAT) IS SUPERIOR TO SALT AND HRAR IN IDENTIFYING LT CANDIDATES WITH ALD AT LOW RISK OF RELAPSE Sedki, M., Kwo, P., Ahmed, A., Hussain, F., Kwong, A. J., Goel, A. WILEY. 2021: 253A-254A