Academic Appointments


2015-16 Courses


All Publications


  • Systems integration for global sustainability SCIENCE Liu, J., Mooney, H., Hull, V., Davis, S. J., Gaskell, J., Hertel, T., Lubchenco, J., Seto, K. C., Gleick, P., Kremen, C., Li, S. 2015; 347 (6225): 963-?
  • Fauna in decline: global assessments. Science Mooney, H., Tallis, H. 2014; 345 (6199): 885-?

    View details for DOI 10.1126/science.345.6199.885-a

    View details for PubMedID 25146278

  • Restoring Native Forest Understory: The Influence of Ferns and Light in a Hawaiian Experiment SUSTAINABILITY Gould, R. K., Mooney, H., Nelson, L., Shallenberger, R., Daily, G. C. 2013; 5 (3): 1317-1339

    View details for DOI 10.3390/su5031317

    View details for Web of Science ID 000324047700030

  • Evolution of natural and social science interactions in global change research programs PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Mooney, H. A., Duraiappah, A., Larigauderie, A. 2013; 110: 3665-3672

    Abstract

    Efforts to develop a global understanding of the functioning of the Earth as a system began in the mid-1980s. This effort necessitated linking knowledge from both the physical and biological realms. A motivation for this development was the growing impact of humans on the Earth system and need to provide solutions, but the study of the social drivers and their consequences for the changes that were occurring was not incorporated into the Earth System Science movement, despite early attempts to do so. The impediments to integration were many, but they are gradually being overcome, which can be seen in many trends for assessments, such as the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, as well as both basic and applied science programs. In this development, particular people and events have shaped the trajectories that have occurred. The lessons learned should be considered in such emerging research programs as Future Earth, the new global program for sustainability research. The transitioning process to this new program will take time as scientists adjust to new colleagues with different ideologies, methods, and tools and a new way of doing science.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1107484110

    View details for Web of Science ID 000315842100003

    View details for PubMedID 23297237

  • A Global System for Monitoring Ecosystem Service Change BIOSCIENCE Tallis, H., Mooney, H., Andelman, S., Balvanera, P., Cramer, W., Karp, D., Polasky, S., Reyers, B., Ricketts, T., Running, S., Thonicke, K., Tietjen, B., Walz, A. 2012; 62 (11): 977-986
  • Finding Common Ground for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services BIOSCIENCE Reyers, B., Polasky, S., Tallis, H., Mooney, H. A., Larigauderie, A. 2012; 62 (5): 503-507
  • Building a global observing system for biodiversity CURRENT OPINION IN ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY Scholes, R. J., Walters, M., Turak, E., Saarenmaa, H., Heip, C. H., Tuama, E. O., Faith, D. P., Mooney, H. A., Ferrier, S., Jongman, R. H., Harrison, I. J., Yahara, T., Pereira, H. M., Larigauderie, A., Geller, G. 2012; 4 (1): 139-146
  • Biodiversity and ecosystem services science for a sustainable planet: the DIVERSITAS vision for 2012-20 CURRENT OPINION IN ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY Larigauderie, A., Prieur-Richard, A., Mace, G. M., Lonsdale, M., Mooney, H. A., Brussaard, L., Cooper, D., Cramer, W., Daszak, P., Diaz, S., Duraiappah, A., Elmqvist, T., Faith, D. P., Jackson, L. E., Krug, C., Leadley, P. W., Le Prestre, P., Matsuda, H., Palmer, M., Perrings, C., Pulleman, M., Reyers, B., Rosa, E. A., Scholes, R. J., Spehn, E., Turner, B. L., Yahara, T. 2012; 4 (1): 101-105
  • Ecosystem services, targets, and indicators for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity FRONTIERS IN ECOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT Perrings, C., Naeem, S., Ahrestani, F. S., Bunker, D. E., Burkill, P., Canziani, G., Elmqvist, T., Fuhrman, J. A., Jaksic, F. M., Kawabata, Z., Kinzig, A., Mace, G. M., Mooney, H., Prieur-Richard, A., Tschirhart, J., Weisser, W. 2011; 9 (9): 512-520

    View details for DOI 10.1890/100212

    View details for Web of Science ID 000296701000019

  • Intervention Ecology: Applying Ecological Science in the Twenty-first Century BIOSCIENCE Hobbs, R. J., Hallett, L. M., Ehrlich, P. R., Mooney, H. A. 2011; 61 (6): 442-450
  • The Intergovernmental science-policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services: moving a step closer to an IPCC-like mechanism for biodiversity CURRENT OPINION IN ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY Larigauderie, A., Mooney, H. A. 2010; 2 (1-2): 9-14
  • Biodiversity targets after 2010 CURRENT OPINION IN ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY Mace, G. M., Cramer, W., Diaz, S., Faith, D. P., Larigauderie, A., Le Prestre, P., Palmer, M., Perrings, C., Scholes, R. J., Walpole, M., Walther, B. A., Watson, J. E., Mooney, H. A. 2010; 2 (1-2): 3-8
  • The ecosystem-service chain and the biological diversity crisis PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Mooney, H. A. 2010; 365 (1537): 31-39

    Abstract

    The losses that are being incurred of the Earth's biological diversity, at all levels, are now staggering. The trend lines for future loss are steeply upward as new adverse drivers of change come into play. The political processes for matching this crisis are now inadequate and the science needs to address this issue are huge and slow to fulfil, even though strong advances have been made. A more integrated approach to evaluating biodiversity in terms that are meaningful to the larger community is needed that can provide understandable metrics of the consequences to society of the losses that are occurring. Greater attention is also needed in forecasting likely diversity-loss scenarios in the near term and strategies for alleviating detrimental consequences. At the international level, the Convention on Biological Diversity must be revisited to make it more powerful to meet the needs that originally motivated its creation. Similarly, at local and regional levels, an ecosystem-service approach to conservation can bring new understanding to the value, and hence the need for protection, of the existing natural capital.

    View details for DOI 10.1098/rstb.2009.0223

    View details for Web of Science ID 000272647200005

    View details for PubMedID 20008383

  • International cooperation in the solution to trade-related invasive species risks YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY 2010 Perrings, C., Burgiel, S., Lonsdale, M., Mooney, H., Williamson, M. 2010; 1195: 198-212

    Abstract

    In this paper, we consider the factors behind the growth of invasive species as a global problem, and the scope for international cooperation and coordination in addressing that problem. This is limited by the terms of the various international agreements governing trade, health, and biodiversity. The default strategy in most cases has two parts: border protection and the control of or adaptation to introduced species that have escaped detection at the border. Most invasive species policy involves unilateral national defensive action as opposed to coordinated international action. We argue that an important part of the solution to the problem lies in global coordination and cooperation in the management of both pathways and sanitary and phytosanitary risks at all scales. More particularly, because invasive species are an externality of trade, transport, and travel that involve public goods, they require collective regulation of international markets that goes beyond that admitted under the World Trade Organization's (WTO) Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures. We argue that it is important to bring that agreement into conformity with the International Health Regulations (IHR), and to develop an international mechanism to generate and disseminate information on invasive species risks and their impacts.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2010.05453.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000282828200011

    View details for PubMedID 20536824

  • Developing a common strategy for integrative global environmental change research and outreach: the Earth System Science Partnership (ESSP) Strategy paper CURRENT OPINION IN ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY Leemans, R., Asrar, G., Busalacchi, A., Canadell, J., Ingram, J., Larigauderie, A., Mooney, H., Nobre, C., Patwardhan, A., Rice, M., Schmidt, F., Seitzinger, S., Virji, H., Voeroesmarty, C., Young, O. 2009; 1 (1): 4-13
  • Biodiversity, climate change, and ecosystem services CURRENT OPINION IN ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY Mooney, H., Larigauderie, A., Cesario, M., Elmquist, T., Hoegh-Guldberg, O., Lavorel, S., Mace, G. M., Palmer, M., Scholes, R., Yahara, T. 2009; 1 (1): 46-54
  • Biodiversity Policy Challenges SCIENCE Mooney, H., Mace, G. 2009; 325 (5947): 1474-1474

    View details for DOI 10.1126/science.1180935

    View details for Web of Science ID 000269887900001

    View details for PubMedID 19762609

  • Invasive species, ecosystem services and human well-being TRENDS IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION Pejchar, L., Mooney, H. A. 2009; 24 (9): 497-504

    Abstract

    Although the effects of invasive alien species (IAS) on native species are well documented, the many ways in which such species impact ecosystem services are still emerging. Here we assess the costs and benefits of IAS for provisioning, regulating and cultural services, and illustrate the synergies and tradeoffs associated with these impacts using case studies that include South Africa, the Great Lakes and Hawaii. We identify services and interactions that are the least understood and propose a research and policy framework for filling the remaining knowledge gaps. Drawing on ecology and economics to incorporate the impacts of IAS on ecosystem services into decision making is key to restoring and sustaining those life-support services that nature provides and all organisms depend upon.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.tree.2009.03.016

    View details for Web of Science ID 000270016800010

    View details for PubMedID 19577817

  • Science for managing ecosystem services: Beyond the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Carpenter, S. R., Mooney, H. A., Agard, J., Capistrano, D., DeFries, R. S., Diaz, S., Dietz, T., Duraiappah, A. K., Oteng-Yeboah, A., Pereira, H. M., Perrings, C., Reid, W. V., Sarukhan, J., Scholes, R. J., Whyte, A. 2009; 106 (5): 1305-1312

    Abstract

    The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) introduced a new framework for analyzing social-ecological systems that has had wide influence in the policy and scientific communities. Studies after the MA are taking up new challenges in the basic science needed to assess, project, and manage flows of ecosystem services and effects on human well-being. Yet, our ability to draw general conclusions remains limited by focus on discipline-bound sectors of the full social-ecological system. At the same time, some polices and practices intended to improve ecosystem services and human well-being are based on untested assumptions and sparse information. The people who are affected and those who provide resources are increasingly asking for evidence that interventions improve ecosystem services and human well-being. New research is needed that considers the full ensemble of processes and feedbacks, for a range of biophysical and social systems, to better understand and manage the dynamics of the relationship between humans and the ecosystems on which they rely. Such research will expand the capacity to address fundamental questions about complex social-ecological systems while evaluating assumptions of policies and practices intended to advance human well-being through improved ecosystem services.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0808772106

    View details for Web of Science ID 000263074600006

    View details for PubMedID 19179280

  • Ecosystem services in decision making: time to deliver FRONTIERS IN ECOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT Daily, G. C., Polasky, S., Goldstein, J., Kareiva, P. M., Mooney, H. A., Pejchar, L., Ricketts, T. H., Salzman, J., Shallenberger, R. 2009; 7 (1): 21-28

    View details for DOI 10.1890/080025

    View details for Web of Science ID 000262934500004

  • How can high seas biodiversity be assessed in order to inform decision-making? Introduction OCEANIS, VOL 35, NOS 1 AND 2 Mooney, H. 2009; 35 (1-2): 41-42
  • Omora Ethnobotanical Park and the UNESCO Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve ECOLOGY AND SOCIETY Hargrove, E. C., Arroyo, M. T., Raven, P. H., Mooney, H. 2008; 13 (2)
  • Should agricultural policies encourage land sparing or wildlife-friendly farming? FRONTIERS IN ECOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT Fischer, J., Brosi, B., Daily, G. C., Ehrlich, P. R., Goldman, R., Goldstein, J., Lindenmayer, D. B., Manning, A. D., Mooney, H. A., Pejchar, L., Ranganathan, J., Tallis, H. 2008; 6 (7): 382-387

    View details for DOI 10.1890/070019

    View details for Web of Science ID 000259308000020

  • International trade in meat: The tip of the pork chop AMBIO Galloway, J. N., Burke, M., Bradford, G. E., Naylor, R., Falcon, W., Chapagain, A. K., Gaskell, J. C., McCullough, E., Mooney, H. A., Oleson, K. L., Steinfeld, H., Wassenaar, T., Smil, V. 2007; 36 (8): 622-629

    Abstract

    This paper provides an original account of global land, water, and nitrogen use in support of industrialized livestock production and trade, with emphasis on two of the fastest-growing sectors, pork and poultry. Our analysis focuses on trade in feed and animal products, using a new model that calculates the amount of "virtual" nitrogen, water, and land used in production but not embedded in the product. We show how key meat-importing countries, such as Japan, benefit from "virtual" trade in land, water, and nitrogen, and how key meat-exporting countries, such as Brazil, provide these resources without accounting for their true environmental cost. Results show that Japan's pig and chicken meat imports embody the virtual equivalent of 50% of Japan's total arable land, and half of Japan's virtual nitrogen total is lost in the US. Trade links with China are responsible for 15% of the virtual nitrogen left behind in Brazil due to feed and meat exports, and 20% of Brazil's area is used to grow soybean exports. The complexity of trade in meat, feed, water, and nitrogen is illustrated by the dual roles of the US and The Netherlands as both importers and exporters of meat. Mitigation of environmental damage from industrialized livestock production and trade depends on a combination of direct-pricing strategies, regulatory approaches, and use of best management practices. Our analysis indicates that increased water- and nitrogen-use efficiency and land conservation resulting from these measures could significantly reduce resource costs.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000251979900002

    View details for PubMedID 18240675

  • Responses of temporal distribution of gastropods to individual and combined effects of elevated CO2 and N deposition in annual grassland ACTA OECOLOGICA-INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY Peters, H. A., Hsu, G., Cleland, E. E., Chiariello, N. R., Mooney, H. A., Field, C. B. 2007; 31 (3): 343-352
  • The nature and value of ecosystem services: An overview highlighting hydrologic services ANNUAL REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENT AND RESOURCES Brauman, K. A., Daily, G. C., Duarte, T. K., Mooney, H. A. 2007; 32: 67-98
  • Interactive effects of fire, elevated carbon dioxide, nitrogen deposition, and precipitation on a California annual grassland ECOSYSTEMS Henry, H. A., Chiariello, N. R., Vitousek, P. M., Mooney, H. A., Field, C. B. 2006; 9 (7): 1066-1075
  • Diverse responses of phenology to global changes in a grassland ecosystem PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Cleland, E. E., Chiariello, N. R., Loarie, S. R., Mooney, H. A., Field, C. B. 2006; 103 (37): 13740-13744

    Abstract

    Shifting plant phenology (i.e., timing of flowering and other developmental events) in recent decades establishes that species and ecosystems are already responding to global environmental change. Earlier flowering and an extended period of active plant growth across much of the northern hemisphere have been interpreted as responses to warming. However, several kinds of environmental change have the potential to influence the phenology of flowering and primary production. Here, we report shifts in phenology of flowering and canopy greenness (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) in response to four experimentally simulated global changes: warming, elevated CO(2), nitrogen (N) deposition, and increased precipitation. Consistent with previous observations, warming accelerated both flowering and greening of the canopy, but phenological responses to the other global change treatments were diverse. Elevated CO(2) and N addition delayed flowering in grasses, but slightly accelerated flowering in forbs. The opposing responses of these two important functional groups decreased their phenological complementarity and potentially increased competition for limiting soil resources. At the ecosystem level, timing of canopy greenness mirrored the flowering phenology of the grasses, which dominate primary production in this system. Elevated CO(2) delayed greening, whereas N addition dampened the acceleration of greening caused by warming. Increased precipitation had no consistent impacts on phenology. This diversity of phenological changes, between plant functional groups and in response to multiple environmental changes, helps explain the diversity in large-scale observations and indicates that changing temperature is only one of several factors reshaping the seasonality of ecosystem processes.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0600815103

    View details for Web of Science ID 000240648300035

    View details for PubMedID 16954189

  • Reduced nitrate leaching and enhanced denitrifier activity and efficiency in organically fertilized soils PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Kramer, S. B., Reganold, J. P., Glover, J. D., Bohannan, B. J., Mooney, H. A. 2006; 103 (12): 4522-4527

    Abstract

    Conventional agriculture has improved in crop yield but at large costs to the environment, particularly off-site pollution from mineral N fertilizers. In response to environmental concerns, organic agriculture has become an increasingly popular option. One component of organic agriculture that remains in question is whether it can reduce agricultural N losses to groundwater and the atmosphere relative to conventional agriculture. Here we report reduced N pollution from organic and integrated farming systems compared with a conventional farming system. We evaluated differences in denitrification potential and a suite of other soil biological and chemical properties in soil samples taken from organic, integrated, and conventional treatments in an experimental apple orchard. Organically farmed soils exhibited higher potential denitrification rates, greater denitrification efficiency, higher organic matter, and greater microbial activity than conventionally farmed soils. The observed differences in denitrifier function were then assessed under field conditions after fertilization. N(2)O emissions were not significantly different among treatments; however, N(2) emissions were highest in organic plots. Annual nitrate leaching was 4.4-5.6 times higher in conventional plots than in organic plots, with the integrated plots in between. This study demonstrates that organic and integrated fertilization practices support more active and efficient denitrifier communities, shift the balance of N(2) emissions and nitrate losses, and reduce environmentally damaging nitrate losses. Although this study specifically examines a perennial orchard system, the ecological and biogeochemical processes we evaluated are present in all agroecosystems, and the reductions in nitrate loss in this study could also be achievable in other cropping systems.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0600359103

    View details for Web of Science ID 000236362600037

    View details for PubMedID 16537377

  • Gastropod herbivory in response to elevated CO2 and N addition impacts plant community composition ECOLOGY Cleland, E. E., Peters, H. A., Mooney, H. A., Field, C. B. 2006; 87 (3): 686-694

    Abstract

    In this study, the influence of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen (N) deposition on gastropod herbivory was investigated for six annual species in a California annual grassland community. These experimentally simulated global changes increased availability of important resources for plant growth, leading to the hypothesis that species with the most positive growth and foliar nutrient responses would experience the greatest increase in herbivory. Counter to the expectations, shifts in tissue N and growth rates caused by N deposition did not predict shifts in herbivore consumption rates. N deposition increased seedling N concentrations and growth rates but did not increase herbivore consumption overall, or for any individual species. Elevated CO2 did not influence growth rates nor have a statistically significant influence on seedling N concentrations. Elevated CO2 at ambient N levels caused a decline in the number of seedlings consumed, but the interaction between CO2 and N addition differed among species. The results of this study indicate that shifting patterns of herbivory will likely influence species composition as environmental conditions change in the future; however, a simple trade-off between shifting growth rates and palatability is not evident.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000236289600017

    View details for PubMedID 16602298

  • Agriculture. Losing the links between livestock and land. Science Naylor, R., Steinfeld, H., Falcon, W., Galloway, J., Smil, V., Bradford, E., Alder, J., Mooney, H. 2005; 310 (5754): 1621-1622

    View details for Web of Science ID 000233961700027

    View details for PubMedID 16339432

  • Responses of grassland production to single and multiple global environmental changes PLOS BIOLOGY Dukes, J. S., Chiariello, N. R., Cleland, E. E., Moore, L. A., Shaw, M. R., Thayer, S., Tobeck, T., Mooney, H. A., Field, C. B. 2005; 3 (10): 1829-1837

    Abstract

    In this century, increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere are expected to cause warmer surface temperatures and changes in precipitation patterns. At the same time, reactive nitrogen is entering natural systems at unprecedented rates. These global environmental changes have consequences for the functioning of natural ecosystems, and responses of these systems may feed back to affect climate and atmospheric composition. Here, we report plant growth responses of an ecosystem exposed to factorial combinations of four expected global environmental changes. We exposed California grassland to elevated CO2, temperature, precipitation, and nitrogen deposition for five years. Root and shoot production did not respond to elevated CO2 or modest warming. Supplemental precipitation led to increases in shoot production and offsetting decreases in root production. Supplemental nitrate deposition increased total production by an average of 26%, primarily by stimulating shoot growth. Interactions among the main treatments were rare. Together, these results suggest that production in this grassland will respond minimally to changes in CO2 and winter precipitation, and to small amounts of warming. Increased nitrate deposition would have stronger effects on the grassland. Aside from this nitrate response, expectations that a changing atmosphere and climate would promote carbon storage by increasing plant growth appear unlikely to be realized in this system.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pbio.0030319

    View details for Web of Science ID 000232404600016

    View details for PubMedID 16076244

  • Confronting the human dilemma NATURE Mooney, H., Cropper, A., Reid, W. 2005; 434 (7033): 561-562

    View details for DOI 10.1038/434561a

    View details for Web of Science ID 000228011000019

    View details for PubMedID 15800597

  • The millennium ecosystem assessment: what is it all about? TRENDS IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION Mooney, H. A., Cropper, A., Reid, W. 2004; 19 (5): 221-224

    Abstract

    Hundreds of scientists from over 70 nations are now engaged in an intensive effort to assess what we know about the status of the world's ecosystems. Here, we describe the fundamental nature of this assessment, what it hopes to accomplish and how it will go about its work. The results of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment will serve as a baseline for future assessments, as well as a blueprint for action for sustaining the ecosystem services upon which we all depend for our well being.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.tree.2004.03.005

    View details for Web of Science ID 000221435600003

    View details for PubMedID 16701257

  • Additive effects of simulated climate changes, elevated CO2, and nitrogen deposition on grassland diversity PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Zavaleta, E. S., Shaw, M. R., Chiariello, N. R., Mooney, H. A., Field, C. B. 2003; 100 (13): 7650-7654

    Abstract

    Biodiversity responses to ongoing climate and atmospheric changes will affect both ecosystem processes and the delivery of ecosystem goods and services. Combined effects of co-occurring global changes on diversity, however, are poorly understood. We examined plant diversity responses in a California annual grassland to manipulations of four global environmental changes, singly and in combination: elevated CO2, warming, precipitation, and nitrogen deposition. After 3 years, elevated CO2 and nitrogen deposition each reduced plant diversity, whereas elevated precipitation increased it and warming had no significant effect. Diversity responses to both single and combined global change treatments were driven overwhelmingly by gains and losses of forb species, which make up most of the native plant diversity in California grasslands. Diversity responses across treatments also showed no consistent relationship to net primary production responses, illustrating that the diversity effects of these environmental changes could not be explained simply by changes in productivity. In two- to four-way combinations, simulated global changes did not interact in any of their effects on diversity. Our results show that climate and atmospheric changes can rapidly alter biological diversity, with combined effects that, at least in some settings, are simple, additive combinations of single-factor effects.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0932734100

    View details for Web of Science ID 000183845800045

    View details for PubMedID 12810960

  • Grassland responses to global environmental changes suppressed by elevated CO2 SCIENCE Shaw, M. R., Zavaleta, E. S., Chiariello, N. R., Cleland, E. E., Mooney, H. A., Field, C. B. 2002; 298 (5600): 1987-1990

    Abstract

    Simulated global changes, including warming, increased precipitation, and nitrogen deposition, alone and in concert, increased net primary production (NPP) in the third year of ecosystem-scale manipulations in a California annual grassland. Elevated carbon dioxide also increased NPP, but only as a single-factor treatment. Across all multifactor manipulations, elevated carbon dioxide suppressed root allocation, decreasing the positive effects of increased temperature, precipitation, and nitrogen deposition on NPP. The NPP responses to interacting global changes differed greatly from simple combinations of single-factor responses. These findings indicate the importance of a multifactor experimental approach to understanding ecosystem responses to global change.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000179629200044

    View details for PubMedID 12471257

  • The evolutionary impact of invasive species Mooney, H. A., Cleland, E. E. NATL ACAD SCIENCES. 2001: 5446-5451

    Abstract

    Since the Age of Exploration began, there has been a drastic breaching of biogeographic barriers that previously had isolated the continental biotas for millions of years. We explore the nature of these recent biotic exchanges and their consequences on evolutionary processes. The direct evidence of evolutionary consequences of the biotic rearrangements is of variable quality, but the results of trajectories are becoming clear as the number of studies increases. There are examples of invasive species altering the evolutionary pathway of native species by competitive exclusion, niche displacement, hybridization, introgression, predation, and ultimately extinction. Invaders themselves evolve in response to their interactions with natives, as well as in response to the new abiotic environment. Flexibility in behavior, and mutualistic interactions, can aid in the success of invaders in their new environment.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000168623300016

    View details for PubMedID 11344292

  • Effect of aquaculture on world fish supplies NATURE Naylor, R. L., Goldburg, R. J., Primavera, J. H., Kautsky, N., Beveridge, M. C., Clay, J., Folke, C., Lubchenco, J., Mooney, H., Troell, M. 2000; 405 (6790): 1017-1024

    Abstract

    Global production of farmed fish and shellfish has more than doubled in the past 15 years. Many people believe that such growth relieves pressure on ocean fisheries, but the opposite is true for some types of aquaculture. Farming carnivorous species requires large inputs of wild fish for feed. Some aquaculture systems also reduce wild fish supplies through habitat modification, wild seedstock collection and other ecological impacts. On balance, global aquaculture production still adds to world fish supplies; however, if the growing aquaculture industry is to sustain its contribution to world fish supplies, it must reduce wild fish inputs in feed and adopt more ecologically sound management practices.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000087871700035

    View details for PubMedID 10890435

  • Does global change increase the success of biological invaders? Trends in ecology & evolution Dukes, J. S., Mooney, H. A. 1999; 14 (4): 135-139

    Abstract

    Biological invasions are gaining attention as a major threat to biodiversity and an important element of global change. Recent research indicates that other components of global change, such as increases in nitrogen deposition and atmospheric CO2 concentration, favor groups of species that share certain physiological or life history traits. New evidence suggests that many invasive species share traits that will allow them to capitalize on the various elements of global change. Increases in the prevalence of some of these biological invaders would alter basic ecosystem properties in ways that feed back to affect many components of global change.

    View details for PubMedID 10322518

  • Modeling the Exchanges of Energy, Water, and Carbon Between Continents and the Atmosphere Science (New York, N.Y.) Sellers, P. J., Dickinson, R. E., Randall, D. A., Betts, A. K., Hall, F. G., Berry, J. A., Collatz, G. J., Denning, A. S., Mooney, H. A., Nobre, C. A., Sato, N., Field, C. B., Henderson-Sellers, A. 1997; 275 (5299): 502-9

    Abstract

    Atmospheric general circulation models used for climate simulation and weather forecasting require the fluxes of radiation, heat, water vapor, and momentum across the land-atmosphere interface to be specified. These fluxes are calculated by submodels called land surface parameterizations. Over the last 20 years, these parameterizations have evolved from simple, unrealistic schemes into credible representations of the global soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer system as advances in plant physiological and hydrological research, advances in satellite data interpretation, and the results of large-scale field experiments have been exploited. Some modern schemes incorporate biogeochemical and ecological knowledge and, when coupled with advanced climate and ocean models, will be capable of modeling the biological and physical responses of the Earth system to global change, for example, increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    View details for PubMedID 8999789

  • FUTURE-DIRECTIONS OF GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH IN TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS TRENDS IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION Mooney, H. A., Chapin, F. S. 1994; 9 (10): 371-372

    View details for Web of Science ID A1994PE12200010

    View details for PubMedID 21236895

  • SCIENCE AND SUSTAINABLE USE ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS Mooney, H. A., Sala, O. E. 1993; 3 (4): 564-566
  • BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM PROCESSES TRENDS IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION Chapin, F. S., Schulze, E. D., Mooney, H. A. 1992; 7 (4): 107-108

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992HL42900002

    View details for PubMedID 21235972

  • RESPONSES OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS TO THE CHANGING ATMOSPHERE - A RESOURCE-BASED APPROACH ANNUAL REVIEW OF ECOLOGY AND SYSTEMATICS Field, C. B., Chapin, F. S., Matson, P. A., Mooney, H. A. 1992; 23: 201-235
  • PREDICTING ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES TO ELEVATED CO2 CONCENTRATIONS BIOSCIENCE Mooney, H. A., Drake, B. G., Luxmoore, R. J., Oechel, W. C., Pitelka, L. F. 1991; 41 (2): 96-104
  • PLANT PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY - DETERMINANTS OF PROGRESS FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY Mooney, H. A. 1991; 5 (2): 127-135
  • RESPONSE OF RADISH TO MULTIPLE STRESSES .1. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND GROWTH-RESPONSES TO CHANGES IN OZONE AND NITROGEN NEW PHYTOLOGIST Pell, E. J., Winner, W. E., VINTENJOHANSEN, C., Mooney, H. A. 1990; 115 (3): 439-446
  • WATER TRANSPORT-PROPERTIES OF VINE AND TREE STEMS IN A TROPICAL DECIDUOUS FOREST AMERICAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY Gartner, B. L., Bullock, S. H., Mooney, H. A., Brown, V. B., Whitbeck, J. L. 1990; 77 (6): 742-749
  • EFFECTS OF SOIL RESOURCES ON PLANT INVASION AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN CALIFORNIAN SERPENTINE GRASSLAND ECOLOGY Huenneke, L. F., Hamburg, S. P., Koide, R., Mooney, H. A., Vitousek, P. M. 1990; 71 (2): 478-491
  • EFFECTS OF NITROGEN ON PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GROWTH-RATES OF 4 CALIFORNIA ANNUAL GRASSES ACTA OECOLOGICA-INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY Hull, J. C., Mooney, H. A. 1990; 11 (4): 453-468
  • THE ECOLOGY AND ECONOMICS OF STORAGE IN PLANTS ANNUAL REVIEW OF ECOLOGY AND SYSTEMATICS Chapin, F. S., Schulze, E. D., Mooney, H. A. 1990; 21: 423-447
  • ANTHROPOGENIC STRESS AND NATURAL-SELECTION - VARIABILITY IN RADISH BIOMASS ACCUMULATION INCREASES WITH INCREASING SO2 DOSE CANADIAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE BOTANIQUE Coleman, J. S., Mooney, H. A., Winner, W. E. 1990; 68 (1): 102-106
  • THE DEPENDENCE OF PLANT-ROOT - SHOOT RATIOS ON INTERNAL NITROGEN CONCENTRATION ANNALS OF BOTANY Levin, S. A., Mooney, H. A., Field, C. 1989; 64 (1): 71-75
  • CARBON-NUTRIENT BALANCE HYPOTHESIS IN WITHIN-SPECIES PHYTOCHEMICAL VARIATION OF SALIX-LASIOLEPIS JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL ECOLOGY Price, P. W., Waring, G. L., JULKUNENTIITTO, R., Tahvanainen, J., Mooney, H. A., Craig, T. P. 1989; 15 (4): 1117-1131
  • LEAF, STEM, AND METAMER CHARACTERISTICS OF VINES IN A TROPICAL DECIDUOUS FOREST IN JALISCO, MEXICO BIOTROPICA Castellanos, A. E., Mooney, H. A., Bullock, S. H., Jones, C., Robichaux, R. 1989; 21 (1): 41-49
  • RELATIONSHIPS AMONG LEAF CONSTRUCTION COST, LEAF LONGEVITY, AND LIGHT ENVIRONMENT IN RAIN-FOREST PLANTS OF THE GENUS PIPER AMERICAN NATURALIST Williams, K., Field, C. B., Mooney, H. A. 1989; 133 (2): 198-211
  • EFFECTS OF MULTIPLE STRESSES ON RADISH GROWTH AND RESOURCE-ALLOCATION .1. RESPONSES OF WILD RADISH PLANTS TO A COMBINATION OF SO2 EXPOSURE AND DECREASING NITRATE AVAILABILITY OECOLOGIA Coleman, J. S., Mooney, H. A., GORHAM, J. N. 1989; 81 (1): 124-131
  • RESPONSES OF WILD PLANTS TO NITRATE AVAILABILITY - RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN GROWTH-RATE AND NITRATE UPTAKE PARAMETERS, A CASE-STUDY WITH 2 BROMUS SPECIES, AND A SURVEY OECOLOGIA Garnier, E., Koch, G. W., Roy, J., Mooney, H. A. 1989; 79 (4): 542-550
  • CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF PLANTS OF A TROPICAL DRY FOREST IN MEXICO FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY Mooney, H. A., Bullock, S. H., Ehleringer, J. R. 1989; 3 (2): 137-142
  • THE NITROGEN-BALANCE OF RAPHANUS-SATIVUS X RAPHANISTRUM PLANTS .2. GROWTH, NITROGEN REDISTRIBUTION AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS UNDER NO3- DEPRIVATION PLANT CELL AND ENVIRONMENT Koch, G. W., Schulze, E. D., PERCIVAL, F., Mooney, H. A., Chu, C. 1988; 11 (8): 755-767
  • TOPOGRAPHIC POSITION EFFECTS ON GROWTH DEPRESSION OF CALIFORNIA SIERRA-NEVADA PINES DURING THE 1982-83 EL-NINO ARCTIC AND ALPINE RESEARCH Armstrong, J. K., Williams, K., Huenneke, L. F., Mooney, H. A. 1988; 20 (3): 352-357
  • COMPENSATING EFFECTS TO GROWTH OF CARBON PARTITIONING CHANGES IN RESPONSE TO SO2-INDUCED PHOTOSYNTHETIC REDUCTION IN RADISH OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A., Kuppers, M., KOCH, G., Gorham, J., Chu, C., Winner, W. E. 1988; 75 (4): 502-506
  • COMPENSATING EFFECTS TO GROWTH OF CHANGES IN DRY-MATTER ALLOCATION IN RESPONSE TO VARIATION IN PHOTOSYNTHETIC CHARACTERISTICS INDUCED BY PHOTOPERIOD, LIGHT AND NITROGEN AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PLANT PHYSIOLOGY Kuppers, M., KOCH, G., Mooney, H. A. 1988; 15 (1-2): 287-298
  • GAS-EXCHANGE AND SO2 FUMIGATION STUDIES WITH IRRIGATED AND UNIRRIGATED FIELD-GROWN DIPLACUS-AURANTIACUS AND HETEROMELES-ARBUTIFOLIA OECOLOGIA Atkinson, C. J., Winner, W. E., Mooney, H. A. 1988; 75 (3): 386-393
  • EFFECTS OF FERTILIZER ADDITION AND SUBSEQUENT GOPHER DISTURBANCE ON A SERPENTINE ANNUAL GRASSLAND COMMUNITY OECOLOGIA Hobbs, R. J., GULMON, S. L., HOBBS, V. J., Mooney, H. A. 1988; 75 (2): 291-295
  • ESTIMATION OF TISSUE CONSTRUCTION COST FROM HEAT OF COMBUSTION AND ORGANIC NITROGEN-CONTENT PLANT CELL AND ENVIRONMENT Williams, K., PERCIVAL, F., Merino, J., Mooney, H. A. 1987; 10 (9): 725-734
  • A SYSTEM FOR CONTROLLING THE ROOT AND SHOOT ENVIRONMENT FOR PLANT-GROWTH STUDIES ENVIRONMENTAL AND EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY Koch, G. W., Winner, W. E., Nardone, A., Mooney, H. A. 1987; 27 (4): 365-377
  • SPATIAL VARIATION IN INOCULUM POTENTIAL OF VESICULAR ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI CAUSED BY FORMATION OF GOPHER MOUNDS NEW PHYTOLOGIST Koide, R. T., Mooney, H. A. 1987; 107 (1): 173-182
  • REVEGETATION OF SERPENTINE SUBSTRATES - RESPONSE TO PHOSPHATE APPLICATION ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Koide, R. T., Mooney, H. A. 1987; 11 (4): 563-567
  • LEAF AND SHOOT DEMOGRAPHY IN BACCHARIS SHRUBS OF DIFFERENT AGES AMERICAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY Hobbs, R. J., Mooney, H. A. 1987; 74 (7): 1111-1115
  • THE ECOLOGY OF BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS ENVIRONMENT Mooney, H. A., Drake, J. A. 1987; 29 (5): 10-?
  • GOPHER MOUND SOIL REDUCES GROWTH AND AFFECTS ION UPTAKE OF 2 ANNUAL GRASSLAND SPECIES OECOLOGIA Koide, R. T., Huenneke, L. F., Mooney, H. A. 1987; 72 (2): 284-290
  • PLANT PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY TODAY BIOSCIENCE Mooney, H. A., Pearcy, R. W., Ehleringer, J. 1987; 37 (1): 18-20
  • CONTRASTING MORPHOLOGICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL TRAITS OF HELIOTROPIUM-CURASSAVICUM L PLANTS FROM DESERT AND COASTAL POPULATIONS ACTA OECOLOGICA-OECOLOGIA PLANTARUM Roy, J., Mooney, H. A. 1987; 8 (2): 99-112
  • A FIELD PORTABLE GAS-EXCHANGE SYSTEM FOR MEASURING CARBON-DIOXIDE AND WATER-VAPOR EXCHANGE-RATES OF LEAVES DURING FUMIGATION WITH SO2 PLANT CELL AND ENVIRONMENT Atkinson, C. J., Winner, W. E., Mooney, H. A. 1986; 9 (9): 711-719
  • BIOMASS ACCUMULATION AND RESOURCE UTILIZATION IN COOCCURRING GRASSLAND ANNUALS OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A., Hobbs, R. J., Gorham, J., Williams, K. 1986; 70 (4): 555-558
  • TISSUE WATER RELATIONS OF 4 COOCCURRING CHAPARRAL SHRUBS OECOLOGIA Davis, S. D., Mooney, H. A. 1986; 70 (4): 527-535
  • COMMUNITY CHANGES FOLLOWING SHRUB INVASION OF GRASSLAND OECOLOGIA Hobbs, R. J., Mooney, H. A. 1986; 70 (4): 508-513
  • WATER-USE PATTERNS OF 4 COOCCURRING CHAPARRAL SHRUBS OECOLOGIA Davis, S. D., Mooney, H. A. 1986; 70 (2): 172-177
  • RESOURCE SHARING AMONG RAMETS IN THE CLONAL HERB, FRAGARIA-CHILOENSIS OECOLOGIA Alpert, P., Mooney, H. A. 1986; 70 (2): 227-233
  • THE CARBON BALANCE OF FLOWERS OF DIPLACUS-AURANTIACUS (SCROPHULARIACEAE) OECOLOGIA Williams, K., Koch, G. W., Mooney, H. A. 1985; 66 (4): 530-535
  • RESOURCE LIMITATION IN PLANTS - AN ECONOMIC ANALOGY ANNUAL REVIEW OF ECOLOGY AND SYSTEMATICS Bloom, A. J., Chapin, F. S., Mooney, H. A. 1985; 16: 363-392
  • VEGETATIVE REGROWTH FOLLOWING CUTTING IN THE SHRUB BACCHARIS-PILULARIS SSP CONSANGUINEA (DC) WOLF,C.B. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY Hobbs, R. J., Mooney, H. A. 1985; 72 (4): 514-519
  • ECOLOGY OF SO2 RESISTANCE .5. EFFECTS OF VOLCANIC SO2 ON NATIVE HAWAIIAN PLANTS OECOLOGIA Winner, W. E., Mooney, H. A. 1985; 66 (3): 387-393
  • ALLOCATION TO REPRODUCTION IN THE CHAPARRAL SHRUB, DIPLACUS-AURANTIACUS OECOLOGIA Alpert, P., Newell, E. A., Chu, C., GLYPHIS, J., GULMON, S. L., Hollinger, D. Y., Johnson, N. D., Mooney, H. A., PUTTICK, G. 1985; 66 (3): 309-316
  • COMPARATIVE WATER RELATIONS OF ADJACENT CALIFORNIA SHRUB AND GRASSLAND COMMUNITIES OECOLOGIA Davis, S. D., Mooney, H. A. 1985; 66 (4): 522-529
  • COMMUNITY AND POPULATION-DYNAMICS OF SERPENTINE GRASSLAND ANNUALS IN RELATION TO GOPHER DISTURBANCE OECOLOGIA Hobbs, R. J., Mooney, H. A. 1985; 67 (3): 342-351
  • CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE COSTS OF MEDITERRANEAN-CLIMATE EVERGREEN AND DECIDUOUS LEAVES .2. BIOCHEMICAL PATHWAY ANALYSIS ACTA OECOLOGICA-OECOLOGIA PLANTARUM Merino, J., Field, C., Mooney, H. A. 1984; 5 (3): 211-229
  • THE SEASONAL DYNAMICS OF LEAF RESIN, NITROGEN, AND HERBIVORE DAMAGE IN ERIODICTYON-CALIFORNICUM AND THEIR PARALLELS IN DIPLACUS-AURANTIACUS OECOLOGIA Johnson, N. D., Chu, C. C., Ehrlich, P. R., Mooney, H. A. 1984; 61 (3): 398-402
  • HERBIVORY ON DIPLACUS-AURANTIACUS SHRUBS IN SUN AND SHADE OECOLOGIA Lincoln, D. E., Mooney, H. A. 1984; 64 (2): 173-176
  • ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS ON STOMATAL CONDUCTANCE IN A SHRUB OF THE HUMID TROPICS PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Mooney, H. A., Field, C., YANES, C. V., Chu, C. 1983; 80 (5): 1295-1297

    Abstract

    Leaves of Piper hispidum, a shrub native to the lowland tropics of Mexico, have a strong stomatal response to humidity that results in similar rates of water loss under a wide range of leaf-to-air water-vapor concentration gradients. Stomatal conductance of these leaves is insensitive to CO(2) concentration and increases in response to high humidity even in the dark.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1983QF63600030

    View details for PubMedID 16593286

  • RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FORM, FUNCTION, AND DISTRIBUTION OF 2 ARCTOSTAPHYLOS SPECIES (ERICACEAE) AND THEIR PUTATIVE HYBRIDS ACTA OECOLOGICA-OECOLOGIA PLANTARUM BALL, C. T., Keeley, J., Mooney, H., Seemann, J., Winner, W. 1983; 4 (2): 153-164
  • CARBON-GAINING CAPACITY AND ALLOCATION PATTERNS OF MEDITERRANEAN-CLIMATE PLANTS ECOLOGICAL STUDIES Mooney, H. A. 1983; 43: 103-119
  • EXTINCTION, SUBSTITUTION, AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES BIOSCIENCE Ehrlich, P. R., Mooney, H. A. 1983; 33 (4): 248-254
  • PHYSIOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS ON PLANT-CHEMICAL DEFENSES ACS SYMPOSIUM SERIES Mooney, H. A., GULMON, S. L., Johnson, N. D. 1983; 208: 21-36
  • PHENOLOGY AND RESOURCE USE IN 3 CO-OCCURRING GRASSLAND ANNUALS OECOLOGIA GULMON, S. L., Chiariello, N. R., Mooney, H. A., Chu, C. C. 1983; 58 (1): 33-42
  • STOMATAL RESPONSES TO HUMIDITY OF COASTAL AND INTERIOR POPULATIONS OF A CALIFORNIAN SHRUB OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A., Chu, C. 1983; 57 (1-2): 148-150
  • COMPROMISES BETWEEN WATER-USE EFFICIENCY AND NITROGEN-USE EFFICIENCY IN 5 SPECIES OF CALIFORNIA EVERGREENS OECOLOGIA Field, C., Merino, J., Mooney, H. A. 1983; 60 (3): 384-389
  • PHOTOSYNTHETIC CHARACTERISTIC OF SOUTH-AFRICAN SCLEROPHYLLS OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A., Field, C., GULMON, S. L., Rundel, P., Kruger, F. J. 1983; 58 (3): 398-401
  • LEAF AGE AND SEASONAL EFFECTS ON LIGHT, WATER, AND NITROGEN USE EFFICIENCY IN A CALIFORNIA SHRUB OECOLOGIA Field, C., Mooney, H. A. 1983; 56 (2-3): 348-355
  • PHOTOSYNTHETIC CHARACTERISTICS OF PLANTS OF A CALIFORNIAN COOL COASTAL ENVIRONMENT OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A., Field, C., Williams, W. E., Berry, J. A., Bjorkman, O. 1983; 57 (1-2): 38-42
  • A PORTABLE SYSTEM FOR MEASURING CARBON-DIOXIDE AND WATER-VAPOR EXCHANGE OF LEAVES PLANT CELL AND ENVIRONMENT Field, C., Berry, J. A., Mooney, H. A. 1982; 5 (2): 179-186
  • ECOLOGY OF SO2 RESISTANCE .4. PREDICTING METABOLIC RESPONSES OF FUMIGATED SHRUBS AND TREES OECOLOGIA Winner, W. E., Koch, G. W., Mooney, H. A. 1982; 52 (1): 16-21
  • CONSTRAINTS ON LEAF STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION IN REFERENCE TO HERBIVORY BIOSCIENCE Mooney, H. A., GULMON, S. L. 1982; 32 (3): 198-?
  • PHYSIOLOGICAL ADAPTATION AND PLASTICITY TO WATER-STRESS OF COASTAL AND DESERT POPULATIONS OF HELIOTROPIUM-CURASSAVICUM L OECOLOGIA Roy, J., Mooney, H. A. 1982; 52 (3): 370-375
  • CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE COSTS OF MEDITERRANEAN-CLIMATE EVERGREEN AND DECIDUOUS LEAVES .1. GROWTH AND CO2 EXCHANGE ANALYSIS OECOLOGIA Merino, J., Field, C., Mooney, H. A. 1982; 53 (2): 208-213
  • PHOTOSYSTEM-II PHOTOSYNTHETIC UNIT SIZES FROM FLUORESCENCE INDUCTION IN LEAVES - CORRELATION TO PHOTOSYNTHETIC CAPACITY PLANT PHYSIOLOGY MALKIN, S., ARMOND, P. A., Mooney, H. A., FORK, D. C. 1981; 67 (3): 570-579

    Abstract

    The use of fluorescence induction measurements in leaves infiltrated with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea has been evaluated as a routine method for estimation of the concentration of the reaction centers of photosystem II relative to total chlorophyll in a wide variety of plant species. The procedure is based on a simple theory that takes into account the attenuation of light in passing through the leaf and the linear dependence of the fluorescence induction time from different parts of the leaf on the inverse of the local light intensity. A formula to calculate the reaction center concentration of photosystem II was obtained. The effect of the light attenuation is accounted for by a correction factor which could become practically insignificant by an optimal choice of the excitation and emission wavelengths and the geometry of the photodetector with respect to the sample. Estimation of quantum yields for primary photochemistry and influence of light scattering were considered. The results demonstrate the effect of the above factors under various circumstances and are in agreement, to a first approximation, with the theory.THE UTILITY OF THE METHOD IS DEMONSTRATED BY A DETAILED STUDY OF FOUR DESERT PLANT SPECIES: estimation of reaction center concentrations of both photosystem I (by estimation of P700) and photosystem II (by the fluorescence induction method) were made and were compared to the rates of CO(2) fixation. There was a good quantitative correlation between the photosynthetic rates and the concentration of photosystem II reaction centers (expressed as per chlorophyll or per unit area of the leaf), but no such correlation was found with photosystem I reaction centers.The ratio of total chlorophyll per reaction centers II varied in the range of about 200 to 800 in different species, but there was no variation of this parameter in any single species.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1981LH50100036

    View details for PubMedID 16661716

  • RATES OF EMISSION OF H2S FROM PLANTS AND PATTERNS OF STABLE SULFUR ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION NATURE Winner, W. E., Smith, C. L., Koch, G. W., Mooney, H. A., Bewley, J. D., Krouse, H. R. 1981; 289 (5799): 672-673
  • TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL VARIABILITY IN THE INTERACTION BETWEEN THE CHECKERSPOT BUTTERFLY, EUPHYDRYAS-CHALCEDONA AND ITS PRINCIPAL FOOD SOURCE, THE CALIFORNIAN SHRUB, DIPLACUS-AURANTIACUS OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A., Williams, K. S., Lincoln, D. E., Ehrlich, P. R. 1981; 50 (2): 195-198
  • PARALLEL EVOLUTION OF LEAF PUBESCENCE IN ENCELIA IN COASTAL DESERTS OF NORTH-AMERICA AND SOUTH-AMERICA OECOLOGIA Ehleringer, J., Mooney, H. A., GULMON, S. L., RUNDEL, P. W. 1981; 49 (1): 38-41
  • PHOTOSYNTHETIC CAPACITY IN RELATION TO LEAF POSITION IN DESERT VERSUS OLD-FIELD ANNUALS OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A., Field, C., GULMON, S. L., Bazzaz, F. A. 1981; 50 (1): 109-112
  • ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS ON THE SEASONALITY OF A DROUGHT DECIDUOUS SHRUB, DIPLACUS-AURANTIACUS AND ITS PREDATOR, THE CHECKERSPOT BUTTERFLY, EUPHYDRYAS-CHALCEDONA OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A., Ehrlich, P. R., Lincoln, D. E., Williams, K. S. 1980; 45 (2): 143-146
  • RESPONSES OF HAWAIIAN PLANTS TO VOLCANIC SULFUR-DIOXIDE - STOMATAL BEHAVIOR AND FOLIAR INJURY SCIENCE Winner, W. E., Mooney, H. A. 1980; 210 (4471): 789-791

    Abstract

    Hawaiian plants exposed to volcanic sulfur dioxide showed interspecific differences in leaf injury that are related to sulfur dioxide-induced changes in stomatal condutance. Species with leaves that did not close stomata developed either chlorosis or necrosis, whereas leaves of Metrosideros collina closed stomata and showed no visual symptoms of sulfur dioxide stress.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1980KP31500024

    View details for PubMedID 17739550

  • STUDY OF THE PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY OF TROPICAL PLANTS - CURRENT STATUS AND NEEDS BIOSCIENCE Mooney, H. A., Bjorkman, O., Hall, A. E., Medina, E., TOMLINSON, P. B. 1980; 30 (1): 22-26
  • ECOLOGY OF SO2 RESISTANCE .1. EFFECTS OF FUMIGATIONS ON GAS-EXCHANGE OF DECIDUOUS AND EVERGREEN SHRUBS OECOLOGIA Winner, W. E., Mooney, H. A. 1980; 44 (3): 290-295
  • ECOLOGY OF SO2 RESISTANCE .2. PHOTOSYNTHETIC CHANGES OF SHRUBS IN RELATION TO SO2 ABSORPTION AND STOMATAL BEHAVIOR OECOLOGIA Winner, W. E., Mooney, H. A. 1980; 44 (3): 296-302
  • ECOLOGY OF SO2 RESISTANCE .3. METABOLIC CHANGES OF C-3 AND C-4 ATRIPLEX SPECIES DUE TO SO2 FUMIGATIONS OECOLOGIA Winner, W. E., Mooney, H. A. 1980; 46 (1): 49-54
  • PATTERNS OF DROUGHT RESPONSE IN LEAF-SUCCULENT SHRUBS OF THE COASTAL ATACAMA DESERT IN NORTHERN CHILE OECOLOGIA RUNDEL, P. W., Ehleringer, J., Mooney, H. A., GULMON, S. L. 1980; 46 (2): 196-200
  • PHOTOSYNTHETIC PLASTICITY OF POPULATIONS OF HELIOTROPIUM-CURASSAVICUM L ORIGINATING FROM DIFFERING THERMAL REGIMES OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A. 1980; 45 (3): 372-376
  • FURTHER OBSERVATIONS ON THE WATER RELATIONS OF PROSOPIS-TAMARUGO OF THE NORTHERN ATACAMA DESERT OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A., GULMON, S. L., RUNDEL, P. W., Ehleringer, J. 1980; 44 (2): 177-180
  • ORIENTATION AND ITS CONSEQUENCES FOR COPIAPOA (CACTACEAE) IN THE ATACAMA DESERT OECOLOGIA Ehleringer, J., Mooney, H. A., GULMON, S. L., Rundel, P. 1980; 46 (1): 63-67
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS FOR CARBON-DIOXIDE AND WATER EXCHANGE ANALYSIS PLANT CELL AND ENVIRONMENT Bloom, A. J., Mooney, H. A., Bjorkman, O., Berry, J. 1980; 3 (5): 371-375
  • PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND MICROCLIMATE OF CAMISSONIA-CLAVIFORMIS, A DESERT WINTER ANNUAL ECOLOGY Ehleringer, J., Mooney, H. A., Berry, J. A. 1979; 60 (2): 280-286
  • SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS AND COMPETITION IN A CHILEAN DESERT CACTUS OECOLOGIA GULMON, S. L., RUNDEL, P. W., Ehleringer, J. R., Mooney, H. A. 1979; 44 (1): 40-43
  • WATER RELATIONS OF SOME DESERT PLANTS IN DEATH-VALLEY, CALIFORNIA FLORA BENNERT, W. H., Mooney, H. A. 1979; 168 (4): 405-427
  • RESISTANCE TO WATER TRANSFER IN DESERT SHRUBS NATIVE TO DEATH-VALLEY, CALIFORNIA PHYSIOLOGIA PLANTARUM SANCHEZDIAZ, M. F., Mooney, H. A. 1979; 46 (2): 139-146
  • NUTRIENT RELATIONS OF THE EVERGREEN SHRUB, ADENOSTOMA-FASCICULATUM, IN THE CALIFORNIA CHAPARRAL BOTANICAL GAZETTE Mooney, H. A., RUNDEL, P. W. 1979; 140 (1): 109-113
  • CONVERGENCE VERSUS NON-CONVERGENCE IN MEDITERRANEAN-CLIMATE ECOSYSTEMS ANNUAL REVIEW OF ECOLOGY AND SYSTEMATICS Cody, M. L., Mooney, H. A. 1978; 9: 265-321
  • LEAF HAIRS - EFFECTS ON PHYSIOLOGICAL-ACTIVITY AND ADAPTIVE VALUE TO A DESERT SHRUB OECOLOGIA Ehleringer, J. R., Mooney, H. A. 1978; 37 (2): 183-200
  • PHOTOSYNTHETIC ACCLIMATION TO TEMPERATURE IN DESERT SHRUB, LARREA-DIVARICATA .1. CARBON-DIOXIDE EXCHANGE CHARACTERISTICS OF INTACT LEAVES PLANT PHYSIOLOGY Mooney, H. A., Bjorkman, O., Collatz, G. J. 1978; 61 (3): 406-410

    Abstract

    Larrea divaricata, a desert evergreen shrub, has a remarkable ability to adjust its photosynthetic temperature response characteristics to changing temperature conditions. In its native habitat on the floor of Death Valley, California, plants of this C(3) species when provided with adequate water are able to maintain a relatively high and constant photosynthetic activity throughout the year even though the mean daily maximum temperature varies by nearly 30 C from winter to summer. The temperature dependence of light-saturated net photosynthesis varies in concert with these seasonal temperature changes whereas the photosynthetic rate at the respective optimum temperatures shows little change.Experiments on plants of the same age, grown at day/night temperatures of 20/15, 35/25, and 45/33 C with the same conditions of day length and other environmental factors, showed a similar photosynthetic acclimation response as observed in nature. An analysis was made of a number of factors that potentially can contribute to the observed changes in the temperature dependence of net CO(2) uptake at normal CO(2) and O(2) levels. These included stomatal conductance, respiration, O(2) inhibition of photosynthesis, and nonstomatal limitations of CO(2) diffusive transport. None of these factors, separately or taken together, can account for the observed acclimation responses. Measurements under high saturating CO(2) concentrations provide additional evidence that the observed adaptive responses are primarily the result of changes in intrinsic characteristics of the photosynthetic machinery at the cellular or subcellular levels. Two apparently separate effects of the growth temperature regime can be distinguished: one involves an increased capacity for photosynthesis at low, rate-limiting temperatures with decreased growth temperature, and the other an increased thermal stability of key components of the photosynthetic apparatus with increased growth temperature.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1978ES65400024

    View details for PubMedID 16660303

  • ENVIRONMENTAL ADAPTATIONS OF ATACAMAN DESERT CACTUS COPIAPOA-HASELTONIANA FLORA Mooney, H. A., WEISSER, P. J., GULMON, S. L. 1977; 166 (2): 117-124
  • VARIABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF DUDLEYA SPECIES GROWING IN NATURAL ENVIRONMENTS OECOLOGIA TROUGHTON, J. H., Mooney, H. A., Berry, J. A., Verity, D. 1977; 30 (4): 307-311
  • CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO MEASUREMENTS OF SUCCULENT PLANTS IN SOUTHERN-AFRICA OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A., TROUGHTON, J. H., Berry, J. A. 1977; 30 (4): 295-305
  • ENERGY-BALANCE OF LEAVES OF EVERGREEN DESERT SHRUB ATRIPLEX-HYMENELYTRA OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A., Ehleringer, J., Bjorkman, O. 1977; 29 (4): 301-310
  • SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN 2 DESERT SHRUBS, ATRIPLEX-HYMENELYTRA AND TIDESTROMIA-OBLONGIFOLIA IN DEATH-VALLEY, CALIFORNIA JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY GULMON, S. L., Mooney, H. A. 1977; 65 (3): 831-838
  • ENVIRONMENTAL LIMITATIONS OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS ON A CALIFORNIA EVERGREEN SHRUB OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A., Harrison, A. T., Morrow, P. A. 1975; 19 (4): 293-301
  • MECHANISM OF MONOTERPENE VOLATILIZATION IN SALVIA-MELLIFERA PHYTOCHEMISTRY DEMENT, W. A., TYSON, B. J., Mooney, H. A. 1975; 14 (12): 2555-2557
  • ADAPTATION TO SERPENTINE SOILS IN CALIFORNIA OF ANNUAL SPECIES LINANTHUS-ANDROSACEUS (POLEMONIACEAE) BULLETIN OF THE TORREY BOTANICAL CLUB WOODELL, S. R., Mooney, H. A., Lewis, H. 1975; 102 (5): 232-238
  • SEASONAL CARBON ALLOCATION IN HETEROMELES-ARBUTIFOLIA, A CALIFORNIA EVERGREEN SHRUB OECOLOGIA Mooney, H. A., Chu, C. 1974; 14 (4): 295-306
  • COMPARATIVE PHOTOSYNTHETIC CAPACITIES OF INTERTIDAL ALGAE UNDER EXPOSED AND SUBMERGED CONDITIONS ECOLOGY JOHNSON, W. S., Gigon, A., GULMON, S. L., Mooney, H. A. 1974; 55 (2): 450-453
  • VOLATILIZATION OF TERPENES FROM SALVIA-MELLIFERA NATURE TYSON, B. J., DEMENT, W. A., Mooney, H. A. 1974; 252 (5479): 119-120
  • SEASONAL-CHANGES IN NET PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF ATRIPLEX-HYMENELYTRA SHRUBS GROWING IN DEATH-VALLEY, CALIFORNIA OECOLOGIA Pearcy, R. W., Harrison, A. T., Mooney, H. A., Bjorkman, O. 1974; 17 (2): 111-119
  • COMPARATIVE CARBON BALANCE AND REPRODUCTIVE MODES OF 2 CALIFORNIAN AESCULUS SPECIES BOTANICAL GAZETTE Mooney, H. A., Bartholomew, B. 1974; 135 (4): 306-313
  • DROUGHT ADAPTATIONS IN 2 CALIFORNIAN-EVERGREEN-SCLEROPHYLLS OECOLOGIA Morrow, P. A., Mooney, H. A. 1974; 15 (3): 205-222
  • SEASONAL-VARIATION IN PRODUCTION OF TANNINS AND CYANOGENIC GLUCOSIDES IN CHAPARRAL SHRUB, HETEROMELES-ARBUTIFOLIA OECOLOGIA DEMENT, W. A., Mooney, H. A. 1974; 15 (1): 65-76
  • CARBOHYDRATE STORAGE CYCLES IN 2 CALIFORNIAN MEDITERRANEAN-CLIMATE TREES FLORA Mooney, H. A., HAYS, R. I. 1973; 162 (3): 295-304