Bio


Dr. Elliott is a thoracic surgeon and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. She provides the complete spectrum of surgical care for lung cancer, esophageal cancer, mediastinal tumors, and more through the Stanford Health Care Thoracic Cancer Program. She specializes in minimally invasive, including robotic, approaches to thoracic surgery.

Dr. Elliott received fellowship training from Stanford University. She completed her residency at UCLA Medical Center.

Her research has received support from the National Institutes of Health. She has investigated cancer cell response to replication stress, outcomes in patients undergoing hyperthermic intrathoracic chemotherapy (HITHOC) for mesothelioma, complications after esophageal surgery, lymph node involvement in patients with carcinoid tumors of the lung, advanced techniques in robotic surgery, and other topics.

She has authored articles that have appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Annals of Thoracic Surgery, JAMA Surgery, and other peer-reviewed publications. She also has contributed to textbooks including the content on social disparities in lung cancer for the book Social Disparities in Thoracic Surgery.

Dr. Elliott has made presentations to her peers at meetings of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Society of Surgical Oncology, Western Thoracic Surgical Association, and other organizations. Presentations focused on surgical treatment of patients with carcinoid tumor of the lung, improvement of mesothelioma patient survival, complications of esophageal surgery, novel targets for cancer treatment, and more.

Clinical Focus


  • Thoracic and Cardiac Surgery

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: American Board of Thoracic Surgery, Thoracic and Cardiac Surgery (2023)
  • Fellowship: Stanford University Thoracic Surgery Fellowship (2022) CA
  • Board Certification: American Board of Surgery, General Surgery (2021)
  • Residency: UCLA General Surgery Residency (2020) CA
  • MD, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons (2013)

All Publications


  • Half of Anastomotic Leaks after Esophagectomy are Undetected on Initial Postoperative Esophagram. The Annals of thoracic surgery Elliott, I. A., Berry, M. F., Trope, W., Lui, N. S., Guenthart, B. A., Liou, D. Z., Whyte, R. I., Backhus, L. M., Shrager, J. B. 2022

    Abstract

    The sensitivity of fluoroscopic esophagrams with oral contrast to exclude anastomotic leak after esophagectomy is not well-documented, and the consequences of missing a leak in this setting have not been previously described.We performed a retrospective cohort study of a prospectively maintained institutional database of patients undergoing esophagectomy with esophagogastric anastomosis 2008-2020. Relevant details regarding leaks, management, and outcomes were obtained from the database and formal chart review. Statistical analysis was performed to compare patients with and without leaks, and those with false negative versus positive esophagrams.There were 384 patients who underwent esophagectomy with gastric reconstruction: the majority were Ivor-Lewis (82%), and 51% were wholly or partially minimally-invasive. Using a broad definition of leak, 55 patients (16.7%) developed an anastomotic leak. Twenty-seven of the 55 patients (49%) who ultimately were found to have a leak initially had a negative esophagram (performed on average on postoperative day 6). Those with a negative initial esophagram were more likely to have an uncontained leak (81% vs. 29%, p<0.01), require unplanned readmission (70% vs. 39%, p=0.02), and undergo reoperation (44% vs. 11%, p<0.01).Early postoperative esophagrams intended to evaluate anastomotic integrity have a low sensitivity of 51%, and leaks missed on initial esophagram have greater clinical consequences than those identified on initial esophagram. These findings suggest a high index of suspicion must be maintained even after a normal esophagram and calls into question the common practice of using this test to triage patients for diet advancement.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2022.04.053

    View details for PubMedID 35618049

  • Social Disparities in Lung Cancer. Thoracic surgery clinics Elliott, I., Gonzalez, C., Backhus, L., Lui, N. 2022; 32 (1): 33-42

    Abstract

    Social disparities in lung cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survival have been studied using national databases, statewide registries, and institution-level data. Some disparities emerge consistently, such as lower adherence to treatment guidelines and worse survival by race and socioeconomic status, whereas other disparities are less well studied. A critical appraisal of current data is essential to increasing equity in lung cancer care.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.thorsurg.2021.09.009

    View details for PubMedID 34801193

  • Resection of a Giant Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma Arising from the Superior Vena Cava. The Annals of thoracic surgery Elliott, I. A., Kasinpila, P., Guenthart, B. A., MacArthur, J. W., Berry, M. F. 2021

    Abstract

    Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma is a rare malignant vascular sarcoma. Here we present a patient with a very large tumor arising from the superior vena cava (SVC), in whom a resection with negative margins was accomplished using veno-venous bypass and bovine pericardial patch reconstruction of the SVC.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2021.01.034

    View details for PubMedID 33529605

  • Smooth Muscle Operator: Robotic-Assisted Enucleation of an Esophageal Leiomyoma. Digestive diseases and sciences Elliott, I. A., Forg√≥, E. n., Lui, N. S. 2021

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10620-020-06703-7

    View details for PubMedID 33479860

  • First lung and kidney multi-organ transplant following COVID-19 Infection. The Journal of heart and lung transplantation : the official publication of the International Society for Heart Transplantation Guenthart, B. A., Krishnan, A., Alassar, A., Madhok, J., Kakol, M., Miller, S., Cole, S. P., Rao, V. K., Acero, N. M., Hill, C. C., Cheung, C., Jackson, E. C., Feinstein, I., Tsai, A. H., Mooney, J. J., Pham, T., Elliott, I. A., Liou, D. Z., La Francesca, S., Shudo, Y., Hiesinger, W., MacArthur, J. W., Brar, N., Berry, G. J., McCarra, M. B., Desai, T. J., Dhillon, G. S., Woo, Y. J. 2021

    Abstract

    As the world responds to the global crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic an increasing number of patients are experiencing increased morbidity as a result of multi-organ involvement. Of these, a small proportion will progress to end-stage lung disease, become dialysis dependent, or both. Herein, we describe the first reported case of a successful combined lung and kidney transplantation in a patient with COVID-19. Lung transplantation, isolated or combined with other organs, is feasible and should be considered for select patients impacted by this deadly disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.healun.2021.02.015

    View details for PubMedID 34059432

  • Commentary: An innovative, minimally-invasive approach to post-pneumonectomy bronchopleural fistula. JTCVS techniques Elliott, I. A., Bedi, H. S., Lui, N. S. 2020; 4: 351-352

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.xjtc.2020.08.032

    View details for PubMedID 34318072

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC8304844

  • Commentary: An innovative, minimally-invasive approach to post-pneumonectomy bronchopleural fistula Comment JTCVS TECHNIQUES Elliott, I. A., Bedi, H. S., Lui, N. S. 2020; 4: 351-352