Bio


Dr. Tung is a fellowship-trained surgeon in the Stanford Health Care Chest Wall Surgery Program. He is a clinical instructor in the Stanford Medicine Department of Surgery.

His areas of expertise include trauma, general, and critical care surgery. He excels at the surgical treatment of chest wall injury, including stabilization of rib fractures.

In his research, Dr. Tung has investigated gastrotomy tube complications. He has participated in the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma study of the surgical treatment of liver injury. Other research interests include massive transfusion strategies and education regarding pre-hospital trauma management.

Dr. Tung has co-authored articles on complications of hernia surgery and other topics. His work has been published in The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery and Case Reports in Surgery. He also co-authored a chapter on chest wall surgery in the Textbook of Emergency General Surgery.

Dr. Tung has made presentations at the American College of Surgeons Annual Meeting, Academic Surgical Congress, and other conferences. Topics include massive transfusions, prehospital trauma care, burn resuscitation, and complications of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in trauma patients.

He is a member of the American College of Surgeons, Chest Wall Injury Society, Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma, and Association for Academic Surgeons. He is a member of the Stanford Medicine Trauma Committee and other committees. He has volunteered as a licensed emergency medical technician (EMT). He also has served as a “Stop the Bleed” instructor with Stanford Medicine as well as with other institutions where he practiced previously.

Dr. Tung is fluent in English and Cantonese. He is proficient in Mandarin.

Clinical Focus


  • General Surgery
  • Surgical Stabilization of Rib Fractures
  • Disaster Management
  • Pre-Hospital Care
  • Trauma Surgery
  • Critical Care Surgery

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: American Board of Surgery, Surgical Critical Care (2021)
  • Board Certification: American Board of Surgery, General Surgery (2020)
  • Medical Education: Tufts University School of Medicine (2014) MA
  • Fellowship: UCSF Fresno Surgical Critical Care Fellowship (2020) CA
  • Residency: Maine Medical Center Program (2019) ME

All Publications


  • Traumatic Injury and Death Among Law Enforcement Officers Patil, A., Tennakoon, L., Choi, J., Hakes, N., Spain, D. A., Tung, J. ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC. 2021: E94
  • Surgical Infection Society Guidelines for Total Abdominal Colectomy versus Diverting Loop Ileostomy with Antegrade Intra-Colonic Lavage for the Surgical Management of Severe or Fulminant, Non-Perforated Clostridioides difficile Colitis. Surgical infections Forrester, J. D., Colling, K. P., Diaz, J. J., Faliks, B., Kim, P. K., Tessier, J. M., Tung, J., Huston, J. M. 2021

    Abstract

    Background: Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) can result in life-threatening illness requiring surgery. Surgical options for managing severe or fulminant, non-perforated C. difficile colitis include total abdominal colectomy with end ileostomy or creation of a diverting loop ileostomy with antegrade vancomycin lavage. Methods: The Surgical Infection Society's Therapeutics and Guidelines Committee convened to develop guidelines for summarizing the current SIS recommendations for total abdominal colectomy versus diverting loop ileostomy with antegrade lavage for severe or fulminant, non-perforated C. difficile colitis. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane database were searched for pertinent studies. Severe infection was defined as laboratory diagnosis of C. difficile infection with leukocytosis (white blood cell count of ≥15,000 cells/mL) or elevated creatinine (serum creatinine level >1.5 mg/dL). Fulminant infection was defined as laboratory diagnosis of C. difficile infection with hypotension or shock, ileus, or megacolon. Perforation was defined as complete disruption of the colon wall. Total abdominal colectomy was defined as resection of the ascending, transverse, descending, and sigmoid colon with end ileostomy. For the purpose of the guideline, the terms subtotal colectomy, total abdominal colectomy, and rectal-sparing total colectomy were used interchangeably. Diverting loop ileostomy with antegrade enema was defined as creation of both a diverting loop ileostomy with intra-operative colonic lavage and post-operative antegrade vancomycin unless otherwise specified. Evaluation of the published evidence was performed using the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Using a process of iterative consensus, all committee members voted to accept or reject each recommendation. Results: We recommend that total abdominal colectomy be the procedure of choice for definitive therapy of severe or fulminant, non-perforated C. difficile colitis. In select patients, colon preservation using diverting loop ileostomy with intra-colonic vancomycin may be associated with higher rates of ostomy reversal and restoration of gastrointestinal continuity but may lead to development of recurrent C. difficile colitis. Conclusions: This guideline summarizes the current Surgical Infection Society recommendations regarding use of total abdominal colectomy versus diverting loop ileostomy with antegrade lavage for adults with severe or fulminant, non-perforated C. difficile infection.

    View details for DOI 10.1089/sur.2021.126

    View details for PubMedID 34619068