Clinical Focus


  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Endocrinopathies in Pregnancy
  • Thyroid Disease in Pregnancy
  • Diabetes in Pregnancy

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Medical Director, Endocrine Disorders in Pregnancy Program (2007 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • National Faculty Award - American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, ACOG Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology (2017-2018)
  • Outstanding Faculty Professor in Obstetrics, Stanford University Hospital Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (2010-2011)
  • Special Excellence in Endoscopic Procedures, American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists (1998-1999)
  • Outstanding Resident Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University Hospital Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (1995-1996)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Obstetrics Quality of Care Committee, Stanford Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (2008 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Residency: UCSF Dept of Internal Medicine (1983) CA
  • Medical Education: Yale School Of Medicine (1980) CT
  • Residency: Stanford University Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency (1997) CA
  • Fellowship: Stanford University Endocrinology Fellowship (1991) CA
  • Board Certification: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecology (2001)
  • Board Certification: American Board of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine (1984)
  • Obstetrics/Gynecology Residency, Stanford University, Obstetrics and Gynecology (1997)
  • Obstetrics/Gynecology Residency, Kaiser Hospital, San Francisco, Obstetrics and Gynecology (1999)
  • Endocrinology Fellowship, Stanford University, Endocrinology and Metabolism (1991)
  • Internal Medicine Residency, University of California, San Francisco, Internal Medicine (1983)
  • M.D. cum laude, Yale University School of Medicine (1980)
  • A. B. cum laude, Princeton University (1976)

Community and International Work


  • Tenwek Hospital, Kenya, East Africa

    Topic

    Staff Physician - Medical, surgical and obstetrical care

    Partnering Organization(s)

    World Medical Missions

    Populations Served

    Kipsigis, Masai, Kikuyu

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

All Publications


  • Fasting Compared With Fed and Oral Intake Before the 1-Hour Oral Glucose Tolerance Test: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Obstetrics and gynecology Sperling, M. M., Leonard, S. A., Miller, S. E., Hurtado, J., El-Sayed, Y. Y., Herrero, T., Faig, J., Carter, S., Blumenfeld, Y. J. 2023; 141 (1): 126-133

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of fasting compared with eating before the 1-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) on gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening results.METHODS: In a single-center, prospective randomized trial, participants were randomized to: 1) fasting for 6 or more hours or 2) oral intake ("fed") within 2 hours of the 50-g, 1-hour OGTT. The 1-hour OGTT was administered after 24 weeks of gestation. A positive screen result was defined as a serum glucose level of 140 mg/dL or higher. Protocol adherence was assessed by a survey administered immediately after the OGTT. We planned to enroll 100 participants in each group to detect an absolute difference of 20 percentage points or more on the 1-hour OGTT screen-positive rate using Fisher exact test, assuming an estimated screen-positive rate of 45% in the fasting and 25% in the fed group and 10% attrition, with a two-sided alpha=0.05, power=0.8. The primary outcome was the 1-hour OGTT screen-positive rate. Secondary outcomes included mean 1-hour OGTT glucose values, GDM diagnosis, maternal and neonatal outcomes, and patient perceptions regarding the 1-hour OGTT.RESULTS: From November 2020 through April 2021, 200 participants were randomized. One hundred ninety-five completed the 1-hour OGTT (97 fasting, 98 fed). Participant surveys confirmed 97.9% (n=95) adherence to the fasting and 91.8% (n=90) adherence to the fed groups. The screen-positive rate was significantly higher in the fasting than the fed group (32.0% vs 13.3%, respectively, P=.002), as was the mean glucose value (127.7 mg/dL vs 113.3 mg/dL, P=.002). The incidence of GDM in the fasting group was 12.4% (n=12) and in the fed group was 5.1% (n=5) (P=.08). There were no significant differences in maternal or neonatal outcomes.CONCLUSION: Fasting for 6 or more hours doubled the incidence of a positive 1-hour OGTT result when compared with eating within 2 hours of the test.CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04547023.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/AOG.0000000000005013

    View details for PubMedID 36701613

  • Fasting vs fed: A randomized trial assessing oral intake prior to the glucose tolerance test Sperling, M., Leonard, S. A., Miller, S. E., El Sayed, Y. Y., Herrero, T., Faig, J., Carter, S., Blumenfeld, Y. J. MOSBY-ELSEVIER. 2022: S189
  • Patient preferences, beliefs, and experiences regarding oral intake and the 1-hour oral glucose tolerance test Sperling, M., Leonard, S. A., Miller, S. E., El-Sayed, Y. Y., Herrero, T., Faig, J., Carter, S., Blumenfeld, Y. J. MOSBY-ELSEVIER. 2022: S325-S326
  • Ketonuria is associated with a positive 1-hour oral glucose tolerance test Sperling, M., Leonard, S. A., Miller, S. E., El-Sayed, Y. Y., Herrero, T., Faig, J., Carter, S., Blumenfeld, Y. J. MOSBY-ELSEVIER. 2022: S574-S575
  • Early Screening and Treatment of Women with Prediabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial. American journal of perinatology Osmundson, S. S., Norton, M. E., El-Sayed, Y. Y., Carter, S., Faig, J. C., Kitzmiller, J. L. 2016; 33 (2): 172-179

    Abstract

    To examine whether women with prediabetes benefit from early treatment for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).Women with a glycosylated hemoglobin A1C (A1C) of 5.7 to 6.4% at <14 weeks were recruited. Participants were randomized to usual care or treatment for GDM with diet, blood glucose monitoring, and insulin as needed. The primary outcome was a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test at 26 to 28 weeks. Secondary outcomes included cesarean delivery, birthweight, weight gain, and A1C change.Between May 2012 and June 2014, 95 women were enrolled and 83 had data for analysis; 42 were randomized to treatment and 41 to usual care. The groups were similar in baseline characteristics with 40% obese. There was no difference in the primary outcome (treatment 45.2% vs. control 56.1%; relative risk [RR] 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53-1.24) except that women in the treatment group had a significantly lower A1C over time than women in the control group (pā€‰=ā€‰0.04). Nonobese women (nā€‰=ā€‰50) treated for GDM experienced a 50% reduction in GDM compared with controls (29.6 vs. 60.9%; RR 0.49; 95% CI 0.25-0.95).Early treatment for women with a first-trimester A1C of 5.7 to 6.4% did not significantly reduce the risk of GDM except in nonobese women.

    View details for DOI 10.1055/s-0035-1563715

    View details for PubMedID 26344009

  • Continuous glucose monitoring in pregnancy: new frontiers in clinical applications and research. Journal of diabetes science and technology Sung, J. F., Taslimi, M. M., Faig, J. C. 2012; 6 (6): 1478-1485

    Abstract

    Current treatment of diabetes in pregnancy relies on intermittent self-monitoring of blood glucoses using finger sticks to monitor capillary blood glucoses. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems are an emerging technology that allow frequent glucose measurements (every 5 min) and the ability to monitor glucose trends in real time. Although these devices are currently expensive and mildly invasive to use, there is huge potential for their use in both the research and clinical realms. From a research perspective, there is the potential to better understand glucose metabolism in pregnancy, both in patients with and without diabetes. For the treating clinician, CGM has the potential to improve detection of hyperglycemic excursions as well as asymptomatic hypoglycemia and the data to improve management of glucose levels in diabetes patients. In this article, we review current literature examining use of CGM in both research and clinical applications.

    View details for PubMedID 23294795

  • Endocrine Complications of Cancer and Its Treatment: Thyroid and Adrenal Dysfunction Cancer Medicine Faig, J., Hoffman, Andrew R. 1993
  • CHRONIC ATYPICAL SEIZURE DISORDER AND CATARACTS DUE TO DELAYED DIAGNOSIS OF PSEUDOHYPOPARATHYROIDISM WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE FAIG, J. C., Kalinyak, J., Marcus, R., Feldman, D. 1992; 157 (1): 64-65

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992JD51600012

    View details for PubMedID 1413750

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC1021912

  • RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA AND BRANCH RETINAL ARTERY-OCCLUSION WITH ANTICARDIOLIPIN ANTIBODY ARCHIVES OF OPHTHALMOLOGY CROFTS, J. W., Nussbaum, J. J., Levine, S. R., FAIG, J. C. 1989; 107 (3): 324-324

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989T597500011

    View details for PubMedID 2923554