Bio


Veterinarian and Researcher with a keen interest in genetic determinants of cardiomyopathies in great apes

Professional Education


  • Ph.D., Stanford University, Genetics (2021)
  • D.V.M., University of London, Royal Veterinary College, Veterinary Medicine and Surgery (2015)

Lab Affiliations


All Publications


  • Ultrarapid Nanopore Genome Sequencing in a Critical Care Setting. The New England journal of medicine Gorzynski, J. E., Goenka, S. D., Shafin, K., Jensen, T. D., Fisk, D. G., Grove, M. E., Spiteri, E., Pesout, T., Monlong, J., Baid, G., Bernstein, J. A., Ceresnak, S., Chang, P. C., Christle, J. W., Chubb, H., Dalton, K. P., Dunn, K., Garalde, D. R., Guillory, J., Knowles, J. W., Kolesnikov, A., Ma, M., Moscarello, T., Nattestad, M., Perez, M., Ruzhnikov, M. R., Samadi, M., Setia, A., Wright, C., Wusthoff, C. J., Xiong, K., Zhu, T., Jain, M., Sedlazeck, F. J., Carroll, A., Paten, B., Ashley, E. A. 2022

    View details for DOI 10.1056/NEJMc2112090

    View details for PubMedID 35020984

  • Deconvoluting complex correlates of COVID-19 severity with a multi-omic pandemic tracking strategy. Nature communications Parikh, V. N., Ioannidis, A. G., Jimenez-Morales, D., Gorzynski, J. E., De Jong, H. N., Liu, X., Roque, J., Cepeda-Espinoza, V. P., Osoegawa, K., Hughes, C., Sutton, S. C., Youlton, N., Joshi, R., Amar, D., Tanigawa, Y., Russo, D., Wong, J., Lauzon, J. T., Edelson, J., Mas Montserrat, D., Kwon, Y., Rubinacci, S., Delaneau, O., Cappello, L., Kim, J., Shoura, M. J., Raja, A. N., Watson, N., Hammond, N., Spiteri, E., Mallempati, K. C., Montero-Martín, G., Christle, J., Kim, J., Kirillova, A., Seo, K., Huang, Y., Zhao, C., Moreno-Grau, S., Hershman, S. G., Dalton, K. P., Zhen, J., Kamm, J., Bhatt, K. D., Isakova, A., Morri, M., Ranganath, T., Blish, C. A., Rogers, A. J., Nadeau, K., Yang, S., Blomkalns, A., O'Hara, R., Neff, N. F., DeBoever, C., Szalma, S., Wheeler, M. T., Gates, C. M., Farh, K., Schroth, G. P., Febbo, P., deSouza, F., Cornejo, O. E., Fernandez-Vina, M., Kistler, A., Palacios, J. A., Pinsky, B. A., Bustamante, C. D., Rivas, M. A., Ashley, E. A. 2022; 13 (1): 5107

    Abstract

    The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has differentially impacted populations across race and ethnicity. A multi-omic approach represents a powerful tool to examine risk across multi-ancestry genomes. We leverage a pandemic tracking strategy in which we sequence viral and host genomes and transcriptomes from nasopharyngeal swabs of 1049 individuals (736 SARS-CoV-2 positive and 313 SARS-CoV-2 negative) and integrate them with digital phenotypes from electronic health records from a diverse catchment area in Northern California. Genome-wide association disaggregated by admixture mapping reveals novel COVID-19-severity-associated regions containing previously reported markers of neurologic, pulmonary and viral disease susceptibility. Phylodynamic tracking of consensus viral genomes reveals no association with disease severity or inferred ancestry. Summary data from multiomic investigation reveals metagenomic and HLA associations with severe COVID-19. The wealth of data available from residual nasopharyngeal swabs in combination with clinical data abstracted automatically at scale highlights a powerful strategy for pandemic tracking, and reveals distinct epidemiologic, genetic, and biological associations for those at the highest risk.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41467-022-32397-8

    View details for PubMedID 36042219

  • Accelerated identification of disease-causing variants with ultra-rapid nanopore genome sequencing. Nature biotechnology Goenka, S. D., Gorzynski, J. E., Shafin, K., Fisk, D. G., Pesout, T., Jensen, T. D., Monlong, J., Chang, P. C., Baid, G., Bernstein, J. A., Christle, J. W., Dalton, K. P., Garalde, D. R., Grove, M. E., Guillory, J., Kolesnikov, A., Nattestad, M., Ruzhnikov, M. R., Samadi, M., Sethia, A., Spiteri, E., Wright, C. J., Xiong, K., Zhu, T., Jain, M., Sedlazeck, F. J., Carroll, A., Paten, B., Ashley, E. A. 2022

    Abstract

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) can identify variants that cause genetic disease, but the time required for sequencing and analysis has been a barrier to its use in acutely ill patients. In the present study, we develop an approach for ultra-rapid nanopore WGS that combines an optimized sample preparation protocol, distributing sequencing over 48 flow cells, near real-time base calling and alignment, accelerated variant calling and fast variant filtration for efficient manual review. Application to two example clinical cases identified a candidate variant in <8 h from sample preparation to variant identification. We show that this framework provides accurate variant calls and efficient prioritization, and accelerates diagnostic clinical genome sequencing twofold compared with previous approaches.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41587-022-01221-5

    View details for PubMedID 35347328

  • Ultra-Rapid Nanopore Whole Genome Genetic Diagnosis of Dilated Cardiomyopathy in an Adolescent With Cardiogenic Shock. Circulation. Genomic and precision medicine Gorzynski, J. E., Goenka, S. D., Shafin, K., Jensen, T. D., Fisk, D. G., Grove, M. E., Spiteri, E., Pesout, T., Monlong, J., Bernstein, J. A., Ceresnak, S., Chang, P., Christle, J. W., Chubb, H., Dunn, K., Garalde, D. R., Guillory, J., Ruzhnikov, M. R., Wright, C., Wusthoff, C. J., Xiong, K., Hollander, S. A., Berry, G. J., Jain, M., Sedlazeck, F. J., Carroll, A., Paten, B., Ashley, E. A. 2022: CIRCGEN121003591

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCGEN.121.003591

    View details for PubMedID 35133172

  • Mapping the human genetic architecture of COVID-19. Nature COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative 2021

    Abstract

    The genetic makeup of an individual contributes to susceptibility and response to viral infection. While environmental, clinical and social factors play a role in exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 disease severity1,2, host genetics may also be important. Identifying host-specific genetic factors may reveal biological mechanisms of therapeutic relevance and clarify causal relationships of modifiable environmental risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 infection and outcomes. We formed a global network of researchers to investigate the role of human genetics in SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 severity. We describe the results of three genome-wide association meta-analyses comprised of up to 49,562 COVID-19 patients from 46 studies across 19 countries. We reported 13 genome-wide significant loci that are associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection or severe manifestations of COVID-19. Several of these loci correspond to previously documented associations to lung or autoimmune and inflammatory diseases3-7. They also represent potentially actionable mechanisms in response to infection. Mendelian Randomization analyses support a causal role for smoking and body mass index for severe COVID-19 although not for type II diabetes. The identification of novel host genetic factors associated with COVID-19, with unprecedented speed, was made possible by the community of human genetic researchers coming together to prioritize sharing of data, results, resources and analytical frameworks. This working model of international collaboration underscores what is possible for future genetic discoveries in emerging pandemics, or indeed for any complex human disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41586-021-03767-x

    View details for PubMedID 34237774

  • High-throughput SARS-CoV-2 and host genome sequencing from single nasopharyngeal swabs. medRxiv : the preprint server for health sciences Gorzynski, J. E., De Jong, H. N., Amar, D., Hughes, C. R., Ioannidis, A., Bierman, R., Liu, D., Tanigawa, Y., Kistler, A., Kamm, J., Kim, J., Cappello, L., Neff, N. F., Rubinacci, S., Delaneau, O., Shoura, M. J., Seo, K., Kirillova, A., Raja, A., Sutton, S., Huang, C., Sahoo, M. K., Mallempati, K. C., Montero-Martin, G., Osoegawa, K., Jimenez-Morales, D., Watson, N., Hammond, N., Joshi, R., Fernandez-Vina, M., Christle, J. W., Wheeler, M. T., Febbo, P., Farh, K., Schroth, G., Desouza, F., Palacios, J., Salzman, J., Pinsky, B. A., Rivas, M. A., Bustamante, C. D., Ashley, E. A., Parikh, V. N. 2020

    Abstract

    During COVID19 and other viral pandemics, rapid generation of host and pathogen genomic data is critical to tracking infection and informing therapies. There is an urgent need for efficient approaches to this data generation at scale. We have developed a scalable, high throughput approach to generate high fidelity low pass whole genome and HLA sequencing, viral genomes, and representation of human transcriptome from single nasopharyngeal swabs of COVID19 patients.

    View details for DOI 10.1101/2020.07.27.20163147

    View details for PubMedID 32766602

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7402057

  • Raltegravir Is a Potent Inhibitor of XMRV, a Virus Implicated in Prostate Cancer and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome PLOS ONE Singh, I. R., Gorzynski, J. E., Drobysheva, D., Bassit, L., Schinazi, R. F. 2010; 5 (3): e9948

    Abstract

    Xenotropic murine leukemia-related retrovirus (XMRV) is a recently discovered retrovirus that has been linked to human prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Both diseases affect a large fraction of the world population, with prostate cancer affecting one in six men, and CFS affecting an estimated 0.4 to 1% of the population.Forty-five compounds, including twenty-eight drugs approved for use in humans, were evaluated against XMRV replication in vitro. We found that the retroviral integrase inhibitor, raltegravir, was potent and selective against XMRV at submicromolar concentrations, in MCF-7 and LNCaP cells, a breast cancer and prostate cancer cell line, respectively. Another integrase inhibitor, L-000870812, and two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, zidovudine (ZDV), and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) also inhibited XMRV replication. When combined, these drugs displayed mostly synergistic effects against this virus, suggesting that combination therapy may delay or prevent the selection of resistant viruses.If XMRV proves to be a causal factor in prostate cancer or CFS, these discoveries may allow for rational design of clinical trials.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0009948

    View details for Web of Science ID 000276418200024

    View details for PubMedID 20376347

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC2848589