Bio


Dr. Jon Sole is a chief resident physician in Psychiatry. He is recognized for his collaborative instinct, innovative solutioning, and spirited leadership. A BA/MSc graduate of Johns Hopkins University in Molecular Neuroscience, Dr. Sole conducted research elucidating AMPA receptor regulatory mechanisms under Dr. Richard Huganir PhD. He completed his MD at Stanford Medicine with a focus on bridging neuroscience to psychiatric spaces, working with Dr. Robert Malenka MD, PhD and Dr. Thomas Südhof MD, PhD to generate/validate transgenic mouse lines for exploring mechanistic components to the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. Currently a PGY4 Psychiatry Chief Resident at Stanford Medicine, he has served as an advocate, leader and change agent in launching residency wide initiatives to improve transparency, equity, and education. At the institutional level, Dr. Sole has pioneered quality improvement efforts with Stanford Healthcare leadership to enhance patient care and operational efficiency. With intent to pursue CL Fellowship and academic CL Psychiatry as a career, he hopes to further current understanding in the care of critically ill populations and lead change with patient wellbeing at the epicenter.

Clinical Focus


  • Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry
  • Critical Care Psychiatry
  • Neuropsychiatry
  • Fellow

Honors & Awards


  • ACLP Travel Award, Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry (2023)
  • Borenstein Scholar, Academic Scholarship - $10,000 (2019)
  • Klingestein Fellow, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Service Award (2019)
  • Stanford Medical Scholar, Academic Research Grant - $59,000 (2016-2019)
  • Lighttower Scholar, Academic Scholarship - $79,700 (2015-2020)
  • Silverstein, Peter and Marg Scholar, Academic Scholarship - $22,200 (2015-2016)
  • Bloomberg Scholar, Academic Scholarship - $130,000 (2008-2012)
  • Meren Scholar, Academic Scholarship - $21,000 (2008-2012)
  • Intel Science Talent Search Semifinalist, Intel Science Talent Search - $1,500 (2008)
  • Young Epidemiology Scholar Finalist, Young Epidemiology Scholars - $2,000 (2008)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Resident Representative, Graduate Medical Education Committee (2023 - Present)
  • Consultant, Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Evidence Based Medicine Subcommittee (2022 - Present)

Professional Education


  • BA, Johns Hopkins University, Neuroscience (2011)
  • MSc, Johns Hopkins University, Molecular Neuroscience (2013)
  • MD, Stanford Medicine (2020)

All Publications


  • Dyspnea and Dyspnea-Associated Anxiety in the ICU patient population: A Narrative Review for CL Psychiatrists. Journal of the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Sher, Y., Desai, N., Sole, J., D'souza, M. P. 2023

    Abstract

    Consultation-liaison (CL) psychiatrists frequently address dyspnea in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Dyspnea is common in this patient population, but is frequently misunderstood and underappreciated in non-communicative ICU patients.This paper provides an updated review on dyspnea specifically in the ICU population, including its pathophysiology and management, pharmacological and non-pharmacological, aimed at CL psychiatrists consulting in ICU.A literature review was conducted with PubMed, querying published articles for topics associated with dyspnea and dyspnea-associated anxiety (DAA) in ICU patient populations. When literature in ICU populations was limited, information was deduced from dyspnea and anxiety management from non-ICU populations. Articles discussing the definition of dyspnea, mechanistic pathways, screening tools, and pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management were included.A reference guide was created to help CL psychiatrists and intensivists in the screening and treatment of dyspnea and DAA in critically ill patients.Dyspnea is frequently associated with anxiety, prolonged days on mechanical ventilation, and worse quality of life after discharge. It can also increase the risk of posttraumatic stress disorder post ICU discharge. However, it is not routinely screened for, identified, or addressed in the ICU. This manuscript provides an updated review on dyspnea and DAA in the ICU population, including its pathophysiology and management, and offers a useful reference for CL psychiatrists to provide treatment recommendations.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jaclp.2023.11.001

    View details for PubMedID 37952697

  • Pediatric parapharyngeal infection resulting in cervical instability and occipital-cervical fusion-case report and review of the literature. Child's nervous system : ChNS : official journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery Chen, Y., Sole, J., Jabarkheel, R., Edwards, M., Cheshier, S. 2019

    Abstract

    Parapharyngeal infection is the most common deep neck space infection in children and, in rare instances, can result in bony destruction of the cervical spine. We report one such case that required occipital to cervical fusion and halo-vest fixation. We also review the literature and discuss the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options for managing pediatric cervical bony destruction secondary to infection.

    View details for PubMedID 30778663

  • National Trends for Reoperation in Older Patients with Glioblastoma. World neurosurgery Chen, Y., Sole, J., Ugiliweneza, B., Johnson, E., Burton, E., Woo, S. Y., Koutourousiou, M., Williams, B., Boakye, M., Skirboll, S. 2018

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Despite multimodal therapies extending patient survival, glioblastoma (GBM) recurrence is all but a certainty. To date, there are few single-center studies of reoperations. Our study aimed to assess GBM reoperation trends nationally in older patients, with emphasis on outcomes.METHODS: The linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database was searched to identify patients 66 years and older with GBM from 1997 to 2010. The primary outcome was survival after diagnosis. Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate analysis with proportional hazard ratios were used.RESULTS: Three thousand nine hundred sixty-three patients with recurrent GBM who initially received a surgical resection were identified (mean age= 74.7 years). Four hundred ninety-six (12%) of the patients with recurrent GBM underwent at least one reoperation at an average of 7.2 months after the initial diagnosis. Reoperation increased survival in patients compared with those who did not have surgical resection (12 vs. 5 months; P < 0.0001; hazard ratio [HR]= 0.666). Within the reoperated cohort, gross total resection improved median survival over subtotal resection (HR= 0.779). Two or more reoperations upon GBM recurrence improved survival to 17 months (P=0.002). The overall complication rate was 21.7% in the initial resection-only group, versus 20.4% in the 1-reoperation group and 25.3% in the 2-reoperation group.CONCLUSIONS: Although definitive conclusions cannot be made given the lack of granularity, our national database study supports gross total resection as the initial treatment of choice, followed by reoperation at the time of recurrence, if tolerated, even in older patients.

    View details for PubMedID 29427817

  • THE EFFECT OF POSTOPERATIVE INFECTION ON SURVIVAL IN PATIENTS WITH GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME Chen, Y., Sole, J., Ugiliweneza, B., Burton, E., Woo, S., Boakye, M., Skirboll, S. OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. 2017: 110
  • NATIONAL TRENDS FOR REOPERATION IN PATIENTS WITH GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME Chen, Y., Sole, J., Ugiliweneza, B., Boakye, M., Skirboll, S. OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. 2016: 191–92