Bio


Kate Hardy is a California Licensed Psychologist who has specialized in working with individuals with psychosis for over 15 years in both research and clinical settings. Dr. Hardy received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Liverpool, United Kingdom. She has worked in specialist early psychosis services in both the UK and the US, including UCSF’s Prodrome Assessment Research and Treatment (PART) program, where she completed her post-doctoral fellowship, and as Clinical Director for the Prevention and Recovery from Early Psychosis (PREP) program. Dr. Hardy has significant experience in providing CBTp to individuals with early psychosis, and those at risk of developing psychosis, in both individual and group settings and integration of this clinical intervention to broader systems and staff teams. She has led multiple trainings and workshops in CBTp to a wide variety of audiences including community clinicians, psychiatrists, and families, and provides ongoing supervision and consultation in this approach. Dr. Hardy is also involved in the implementation of national strategies to increase dissemination of early psychosis models with the aim of bringing these cutting edge treatments to a broader population.

Clinical Focus


  • Psychosis
  • Schizophrenia and Disorders with Psychotic Features
  • Psychology

Academic Appointments


  • Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
  • Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Honors & Awards


  • Fellowship in the Community Academic Research Training Alliance (CARTA), University of California, San Francisco (2009)

Professional Education


  • Professional Education:University of Liverpool (2007)
  • Fellowship:University of California at San Francisco School of Medicine (2012) CA
  • BSc, University of Manchester, Psychology (2001)

All Publications


  • Cognitive Interventions Targeting Brain Plasticity in the Prodromal and Early Phases of Schizophrenia ANNUAL REVIEW OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, VOL 9 Fisher, M., Loewy, R., Hardy, K., Schlosser, D., Vinogradov, S. 2013; 9: 435-463

    Abstract

    Several important paradigm shifts have occurred in the field of schizophrenia treatment, including an increased focus on early detection, the development of preemptive interventions, and the view of schizophrenia as a neurodevelopmental disease characterized by decreased efficiency and abnormal connectivity in cortical and subcortical neural networks. In this review, we briefly describe some of the neural impairments that contribute to the development of schizophrenia, with an emphasis on the impact of stress and trauma on cognitively vulnerable neural systems. We then present current data on two behavioral interventions that target these critical risk factors and that aim to preempt the onset of schizophrenia in vulnerable individuals or improve the clinical course in recent-onset schizophrenia: cognitive therapy and computerized cognitive training.

    View details for DOI 10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-032511-143134

    View details for Web of Science ID 000321742100018

    View details for PubMedID 23297786

  • Psychosocial interventions for adolescents at clinical high risk for psychosis: cognitive behavioral therapy Adolescent Psychiatry Hardy, K. V., Loewy, R. 2012; 2: 172-181
  • Filling the implementation gap: a community-academic partnership approach to early intervention in psychosis EARLY INTERVENTION IN PSYCHIATRY Hardy, K. V., Moore, M., Rose, D., Bennett, R., Jackson-Lane, C., Gause, M., Jackson, A., Loewy, R. 2011; 5 (4): 366-374

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to describe the development of a sustainable community early psychosis programme created through an academic-community partnership in the United States to other parties interested in implementing early psychosis services founded upon evidence-based practices within community settings.The service was developed around a sustainable core of key components, founded upon evidence-based practice, with additional flexible elements that could be adapted to the needs of the individual commissioning county. This paper describes the ways in which funding was sourced and secured as well as the partnerships developed through this process.Successful development of the Prevention and Recovery from Early Psychosis (PREP) programme in San Francisco County, California. PREP clinicians have received extensive training in the evidence-based approaches that are available through the programme and treated 30 clients and their families in the first year of operation.Development of a sustainable community programme of this type in a non-universal health-care setting, which is historically seen as non-integrated, required extensive partnering with agencies familiar with local resources. Implementation of the community-academic partnership bridged the gap between research and practice with successful integration of fidelity practice at the community level. The community partners were effective in sourcing funding and allocating resources, while the academic side of the partnership provided training in evidence-based models and oversight of clinical implementation of the model. Stringent evaluation of the impact of the service is our next focus.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1751-7893.2011.00310.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000297018400013

    View details for PubMedID 22032550

  • At risk of developing psychosis: the research perspective Experiencing psychosis: personal and professional perspectives Hardy , K. Routledge. 2011
  • Re-envisioning psychosis: a new language for clinical practice Current Psychiatry Rose, D., Stuart, B., Hardy, K., Loewy, R. 2010; 9: 23-28
  • THE SUBJECTIVE EXPERIENCE OF PEOPLE AT A HIGH RISK OF DEVELOPING PSYCHOSIS JOURNEYING INTO AND THROUGH AN EARLY DETECTION FOR PSYCHOSIS SERVICE 12th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research Hardy, K. V., Dickson, J. M., Morrison, A. P. OXFORD UNIV PRESS. 2009: 309–310