Bio


Dr. Eisen is a Clinical Associate Professor and CA Licensed Clinical Psychologist in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She works with the INSPIRE clinic at Stanford and is the Inpatient Director of Psychological Services for the acute inpatient psychiatric units at Stanford Hospital. Her research and clinical interest center on therapeutic interventions that support recovery for individuals living with serious mental illness, in particular for individuals experiencing psychosis. Dr. Eisen received her bachelor’s degree from Cornell University, and her PhD from the University of Connecticut, and completed postdoctoral training at Stanford University. She is trained in CBT for psychosis (CBTp) and provides training and consultation in CBTp and CBTp informed skills to community-based clinicians, graduate students, medical students and residents, to support the use of recovery-oriented psychosocial interventions with individuals experiencing psychosis.

Clinical Focus


  • Psychology
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis
  • Early Intervention for Psychosis

Academic Appointments


  • Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Professional Education


  • Fellowship: Stanford University Pain Management Fellowship (2006) CA
  • PhD Training: University of Connecticut - Dept of Psychology (2005) CT
  • Internship: Coler-Goldwater Specialy Hospital and Nursing Facility (2005) NY

All Publications


  • Confronting the dialectic between quality and access in early psychosis care in the United States: Finding the synthesis by leveraging psychological expertise. Psychological services Wood, H. J., Eisen, K., Hardy, K. V., Reznik, S. J., Shapiro, D. I., Thompson, E. C., Gaither, M. L., Kopelovich, S. 2023

    Abstract

    Coordinated specialty care (CSC) is the dominant model for early psychosis care in the United States, representing a proactive recovery-oriented approach to serious mental illness in its early stages. CSC involves broad multidisciplinary support for participants, including from psychologists in some CSC teams, encompassing educational and vocational support, medication management, psychotherapy, case management, peer support, and family interventions. CSC programs have proliferated in the last 20 years, leading to a quality-access dialectic, where increasing access to treatment simultaneously prompts concerns about care quality, particularly in the context of staffing shortages and funding limits. Evidence-based psychosocial treatment, including psychotherapy, is an integral part of CSC, yet workforce training deficits, workforce turnover, and CSC financing pose threats to intervention fidelity and thus CSC participants' ability to access high-quality care. We propose an enhanced role for psychologists as a way of resolving the quality-access dialectic in the area of psychosocial treatment, specifically evidence-based therapy. We describe the potential of psychologists' skills in clinical supervision, formulation, evidence-based interventions and measurement-based care, drawing on practice examples. After considering possible limitations, we outline implementation models, for example, drawing on Early Psychosis Intervention Network and Project Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes. We conclude with four recommendations: Psychologists should be placed in CSC team or network-leadership roles; psychological expertise should be made available to CSC teams for training, consultation, and technical assistance; psychological expertise should be used to address CSC implementation challenges; and research is needed to demonstrate psychologists' value to stakeholders. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved).

    View details for DOI 10.1037/ser0000826

    View details for PubMedID 38127500

  • Single-Dose Psilocybin for a Treatment-Resistant Episode of Major Depression. The New England journal of medicine Goodwin, G. M., Aaronson, S. T., Alvarez, O., Arden, P. C., Baker, A., Bennett, J. C., Bird, C., Blom, R. E., Brennan, C., Brusch, D., Burke, L., Campbell-Coker, K., Carhart-Harris, R., Cattell, J., Daniel, A., DeBattista, C., Dunlop, B. W., Eisen, K., Feifel, D., Forbes, M., Haumann, H. M., Hellerstein, D. J., Hoppe, A. I., Husain, M. I., Jelen, L. A., Kamphuis, J., Kawasaki, J., Kelly, J. R., Key, R. E., Kishon, R., Knatz Peck, S., Knight, G., Koolen, M. H., Lean, M., Licht, R. W., Maples-Keller, J. L., Mars, J., Marwood, L., McElhiney, M. C., Miller, T. L., Mirow, A., Mistry, S., Mletzko-Crowe, T., Modlin, L. N., Nielsen, R. E., Nielson, E. M., Offerhaus, S. R., O'Keane, V., Páleníček, T., Printz, D., Rademaker, M. C., van Reemst, A., Reinholdt, F., Repantis, D., Rucker, J., Rudow, S., Ruffell, S., Rush, A. J., Schoevers, R. A., Seynaeve, M., Shao, S., Soares, J. C., Somers, M., Stansfield, S. C., Sterling, D., Strockis, A., Tsai, J., Visser, L., Wahba, M., Williams, S., Young, A. H., Ywema, P., Zisook, S., Malievskaia, E. 2022; 387 (18): 1637-1648

    Abstract

    Psilocybin is being studied for use in treatment-resistant depression.In this phase 2 double-blind trial, we randomly assigned adults with treatment-resistant depression to receive a single dose of a proprietary, synthetic formulation of psilocybin at a dose of 25 mg, 10 mg, or 1 mg (control), along with psychological support. The primary end point was the change from baseline to week 3 in the total score on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS; range, 0 to 60, with higher scores indicating more severe depression). Secondary end points included response at week 3 (≥50% decrease from baseline in the MADRS total score), remission at week 3 (MADRS total score ≤10), and sustained response at 12 weeks (meeting response criteria at week 3 and all subsequent visits).A total of 79 participants were in the 25-mg group, 75 in the 10-mg group, and 79 in the 1-mg group. The mean MADRS total score at baseline was 32 or 33 in each group. Least-squares mean changes from baseline to week 3 in the score were -12.0 for 25 mg, -7.9 for 10 mg, and -5.4 for 1 mg; the difference between the 25-mg group and 1-mg group was -6.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.2 to -2.9; P<0.001) and between the 10-mg group and 1-mg group was -2.5 (95% CI, -6.2 to 1.2; P = 0.18). In the 25-mg group, the incidences of response and remission at 3 weeks, but not sustained response at 12 weeks, were generally supportive of the primary results. Adverse events occurred in 179 of 233 participants (77%) and included headache, nausea, and dizziness. Suicidal ideation or behavior or self-injury occurred in all dose groups.In this phase 2 trial involving participants with treatment-resistant depression, psilocybin at a single dose of 25 mg, but not 10 mg, reduced depression scores significantly more than a 1-mg dose over a period of 3 weeks but was associated with adverse effects. Larger and longer trials, including comparison with existing treatments, are required to determine the efficacy and safety of psilocybin for this disorder. (Funded by COMPASS Pathfinder; EudraCT number, 2017-003288-36; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT03775200.).

    View details for DOI 10.1056/NEJMoa2206443

    View details for PubMedID 36322843

  • Training inpatient psychiatric nurses and staff to utilize CBTp informed skills in an acute inpatient psychiatric setting PSYCHOSIS-PSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIAL AND INTEGRATIVE APPROACHES Eisen, K., Kharrazi, N., Simonson, A., Lean, M., Hardy, K. 2021
  • CBT for Psychosis: Process-Oriented Therapies and the Third Wave (Book Review) JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY Book Review Authored by: Eisen, K., Hardy, K. 2020; 59 (3): 446–48
  • Reading and Recovery Expectations: Implementing a Recovery-Oriented Bibliotherapy Program in an Acute Inpatient Psychiatric Setting PSYCHIATRIC REHABILITATION JOURNAL Eisen, K., Lawlor, C., Wu, C., Mason, D. 2018; 41 (3): 243–45

    Abstract

    This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of developing a recovery-oriented book club in an acute inpatient psychiatric setting, and the impact of participation on measures of hope and recovery orientation.Participants were recruited from an inpatient psychiatric hospital and assigned to control (N = 13) or experimental (N = 13) conditions. Participants completed the Herth Hope Index (HHI) and the Mental Health Confidence Scale (MHCS) at baseline and follow-up. Book club participants completed a satisfaction survey. ANOVA was performed to examine changes on HHI and MHCS.No significant differences were found between conditions on HHI or MHCS. On the satisfaction survey, most book club participants agreed "somewhat" or "strongly" that the intervention increased self-understanding (92.3%) and hope (61.6%).Book club groups may help individuals in inpatient psychiatric settings feel more hopeful. Future research may examine the adaptability of this intervention for outpatient settings. (PsycINFO Database Record

    View details for DOI 10.1037/prj0000307

    View details for Web of Science ID 000443083500009

    View details for PubMedID 29975083

  • Stress management in the workplace: A comparison of a computer-based and an in-person stress-management intervention COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR Eisen, K. P., Allen, G. J., Bollash, M., Pescatello, L. S. 2008; 24 (2): 486-496
  • DEVELOPING A LIVED EXPERIENCE ADVISORY COUNCIL IN AN ACADEMIC EARLY INTERVENTION FOR PSYCHOSIS CLINIC. Eisen, K., Lean, M., Ballon, J., Zepp, C., Liliental, J., Hardy, K. OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. 2021: S140
  • BUILDING AN EFFECTIVE COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY GROUP IN AN ACUTE INPATIENT PSYCHIATRIC SETTING Eisen, K., Kharrazi, N. SPRINGER. 2017: S433–S434
  • PROVIDING BRIEF EVIDENCE-BASED INTERVENTIONS IN HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL SETTINGS Eisen, K., Kharrazi, N., Hoover, V. SPRINGER. 2017: S433
  • PROVIDING MEANINGFUL & EFFECTIVE BRIEF INDIVIDUAL PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERVENTIONS IN AN ACUTE INPATIENT SETTING Kharrazi, N., Eisen, K. SPRINGER. 2017: S434–S435