Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Research Associate, Dept. of Psychiatry, Duke University Medical Center (1961 - 1962)
  • Asst. Professor, Dept. of Psychiatry, Duke University Medical Center (1962 - 1967)
  • Associate Professor, Dept. of Psychiatry, Duke University Medical Center (1967 - 1971)
  • Professor, Dept. of Psychiatry, Duke University Medical Center (1971 - 1974)
  • Professor of Psychology, Dept. of Psychology, University of Southern California (1974 - 1981)
  • Director, Adult Counseling Center, University of Southern California (1974 - 1981)
  • Research Associate, Andrus Gerontology Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles (1974 - 1983)
  • Associate Director for Research & Development, Menlo Park Division, Geriatric Research, Education & Clinical Center (GRECC), VA Medical Center, Palo Alto (1985 - 1997)
  • Professor of Medicine (Research), Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Gerontology & Metabolism (1987 - 1997)
  • Professor of Medicine, Emeritus (Research), Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Gerontology & Metabolism (1997 - Present)
  • The Goldman Family Professor of Psychology, Pacific Graduate School of Psychology, now Emeritus (1997 - 2005)

Honors & Awards


  • Editor, Behavioral and Social Sciences Section, Journal of Gerontology (1975-1978)
  • Consultant, Federal Food and Drug Administration (1976-1978)
  • Member, Clinical Research Projects Review Committee of the National Institute of Mental Health (1975-1979)
  • Member, Aging Review Committee of the National Institute on Aging for the National Institutes of Health (1980-1983)
  • Member, NIMH Review Committee, TDA-III, Clinical Research Centers (1986-1989)
  • Consulting Editor, Psychology and Aging (1997- 1999)
  • Master Lecture Series, American Psychological Association Convention (1978)
  • Recipient of the annual M. Powell Lawton Award for excellence in Geropsychology, The American Psychological Assn. at their annual meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii (2004)
  • Editor-in-Chief, Clinical Gerontologist Journal, published quarterly by Haworth Press (2004-present)

Professional Education


  • Ph.D., Florida State University, Clinical Psychology (1961)
  • M.A., Florida State University, Psychology (1958)
  • B.A., George Washington University, Psychology (1955)

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Dr. Thompson’s interests include psychosocial treatments for individuals with bipolar disorder and /or other serious mental illnesses; cognitive/behavioral therapy for late-life depression; intervention research with culturally diverse individuals with depression; and psychophysiological research on stress & coping.

All Publications


  • The effectiveness of nonpharmacological interventions for informal dementia caregivers: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Psychology and aging Cheng, S. T., Li, K. K., Losada, A., Zhang, F., Au, A., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2020; 35 (1): 55–77

    Abstract

    This systematic review and meta-analysis compared the effects of 131 randomized controlled trials, published between 2006 and mid-2018, for dementia caregivers with community-dwelling care-recipients. A new classification of interventions was proposed to enable a more detailed examination of the effectiveness of psychological interventions; 350 postintervention effect sizes in 128 studies and 155 follow-up effect sizes in 55 studies were computed. Postintervention effects were significant for all outcomes when all interventions are pooled together. Follow-up effects were found for all outcomes, except physical health and positive aspects of caregiving. Educational programs with psychotherapeutic components, counseling/psychotherapy, and mindfulness-based interventions had the strongest effects on reducing depressive symptoms. Multicomponent and miscellaneous interventions had the largest effects on reduction of burden/stress. Multicomponent and mindfulness-based interventions had the largest effects on enhancing subjective well-being. It should be noted that mindfulness and counseling/psychotherapy studies generally had small samples, and studies with smaller sample sizes tended to report larger effects. Metaregression analyses revealed that, overall, younger caregivers benefited more from the interventions. Although the majority of studies were from North America and Europe, there were a growing number from Asia and other parts of the world. Recommendations were made, including developing new theoretical models that address caregivers' changing needs over time; development of interventions that can be flexibly administered and individually "tailored," and assessing positive as well as negative aspects of caregiving to encourage development of greater resilience. We conclude with observations on the global health significance of improving the impact of psychosocial interventions on caregivers' lives. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).

    View details for DOI 10.1037/pag0000401

    View details for PubMedID 31985249

  • Telephone-based behavioral activation intervention for dementia family caregivers: Outcomes and mediation effect of a randomized controlled trial. Patient education and counseling Au, A., Yip, H. M., Lai, S., Ngai, S., Cheng, S. T., Losada, A., Thompson, L., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2019

    Abstract

    The study examined the effects of a telephone-administered psycho-education with behavioral activation intervention (TBA) for family caregivers of person's with Alzheimer's dementia to reduce levels of depressive symptoms and burden and to enhance relationship satisfaction with the care-recipient METHODS: A double-blinded randomized trial compared TBA with telephone-based psycho-education with general monitoring (TGM). Ninety-six dementia caregivers were randomized. Both conditions received four weekly psycho-education sessions led by a social worker. TBA participants then received eight bi-weekly behavioral activation practice sessions delivered by paraprofessionals. TGM participants received eight bi-weekly monitoring sessions by paraprofessionals.As compared to TGM, TBA participants reported significantly larger reductions in depressive symptoms and burden and larger improvement in relationship satisfaction. Self-efficacy for controlling upsetting thoughts was found to have a partial meditation effect between TBA and the reduction of depressive symptoms. Qualitative feedback suggested that TBA participants expressed unique gains in awareness and developing new ways of reappraising the caregiving situation.TBA was an effective intervention to reduce depressive symptoms and burden as well as to enhance relationship satisfaction in dementia caregivers.The use of telephone and trained paraprofessionals can enhance the accessibility and sustainability of behavioral activation intervention for dementia family caregivers.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2019.06.009

    View details for PubMedID 31279613

  • Psychological Interventions for Dementia Caregivers: What We Have Achieved, What We Have Learned. Current psychiatry reports Cheng, S. T., Au, A., Losada, A., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2019; 21 (7): 59

    Abstract

    With the rising dementia population, more and more programs have been developed to help caregivers deal with the care-recipient as well as their own frustrations. Many interventions aim to enhance caregiver's ability to manage behavior problems and other deteriorations in functioning, with less direct emphasis placed on caring for the caregivers. We argue that techniques based on psychotherapy are strategically important in assistance provided to caregivers because of their utility for promoting emotional health. This article provides a focused review of such methods used in evidence-based intervention programs, along with the mechanisms of change associated with these methods. While cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has a strong evidence base, there is also a growing trend to package CBT techniques into various psychoeducational programs. These programs, which we call psychoeducation with psychotherapeutic programs, have been consistently found to be effective in reducing caregiver distress and are suited for delivery in group format, even by paraprofessionals, to lower the cost of intervention. A recent trend is the effective use of technological aids (e.g., the internet) to deliver CBT and psychoeducation, reaching more caregivers. As for therapeutic mechanisms, the use of coping skills, reduced dysfunctional thoughts, and increased self-efficacy in controlling upsetting thoughts has received support in studies. We conclude that psychotherapeutic techniques are increasingly being used effectively and efficiently to assist caregivers, aided by successful adaptation for educational or technologically advanced means of delivery. More research on therapeutic mechanisms is needed to understand how the techniques work and how they can be further refined.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s11920-019-1045-9

    View details for PubMedID 31172302

  • Helping Hispanic Dementia Caregivers Cope with Stress Using Technology-based Resources CLINICAL GERONTOLOGIST Kajiyama, B., Fernandez, G., Carter, E. A., Humber, M. B., Thompson, L. W. 2018; 41 (3): 209–16

    Abstract

    The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate a culturally appropriate intervention for Hispanic/Latino caregivers of individuals with dementia, using a structured online program without professional involvement to improve well-being, decrease stress, and reduce depression.The Webnovela Mirela, an online Spanish-language telenovela, was designed specifically to teach caregivers how to cope with dementia caregiving. A prototype of Webnovela Mirela was tested in a pilot study with 25 Hispanic/Latino dementia caregivers, 19 of whom completed the study.Data were analyzed using paired-samples t-tests. Results indicated a significant decrease from pre- to post-treatment in levels of stress and symptoms of depression (p = .045).The pilot study indicated high potential of the Webnovela Mirela to help the target population and demonstrated that the telenovela format is acceptable and helpful for Hispanic dementia caregivers.Study outcomes suggested that self-paced approaches with culturally relevant content in an appealing format for the target population have the potential to implement effective interventions. Furthermore, technology enables support programs to reach a broader audience in a cost-effective manner. Of note is the fact that minimal professional and/or personal assistance was required for caregivers to complete this intervention.

    View details for PubMedID 29236621

  • Randomized Controlled Trial of Inner Resources Meditation for Family Dementia Caregivers. Journal of clinical psychology Waelde, L. C., Meyer, H., Thompson, J. M., Thompson, L., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2017

    Abstract

    This randomized controlled trial examined the comparative effectiveness of 2 interventions for improving diurnal cortisol slope and life satisfaction and reducing stress symptoms among older female dementia family caregivers.Thirty-one family dementia caregivers were randomized to 8 weeks of Inner Resources for Stress mindfulness meditation and mantra training (IR) or psychoeducation and telephone support (PTS).Intention-to-treat analyses revealed statistically significant pre-post improvements in diurnal cortisol slope and overall life satisfaction, but not depression or self-efficacy, in the IR relative to the PTS group. Adherence to between-session meditation practice was significantly associated with decreases in depression and self-reported improvements in ability to cope with stress. In addition, IR participants rated the overall benefits of the program more highly than the PTS group.These results indicate that mindfulness meditation and mantra has promise as a feasible and effective caregiver intervention for quality of life and physiological responding to stress.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/jclp.22470

    View details for PubMedID 28263398

  • Robust NaO2 Electrochemistry in Aprotic Na-O-2 Batteries Employing Ethereal Electrolytes with a Protic Additive JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LETTERS Abate, I. I., Thompson, L. E., Kim, H., Aetukuri, N. B. 2016; 7 (12): 2164-2169

    Abstract

    Aprotic metal-oxygen batteries, such as Li-O2 and Na-O2 batteries, are of topical research interest as high specific energy alternatives to state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries. In particular, Na-O2 batteries with NaO2 as the discharge product offer higher practical specific energy with better rechargeability and round-trip energy efficiency when compared to Li-O2 batteries. In this work, we show that the electrochemical deposition and dissolution of NaO2 in Na-O2 batteries is unperturbed by trace water impurities in Na-O2 battery electrolytes, which is desirable for practical battery applications. We find no evidence for the formation of other discharge products such as Na2O2·H2O. Furthermore, the electrochemical efficiency during charge remains near ideal in the presence of trace water in electrolytes. Although sodium anodes react with trace water leading to the formation of a high-impedance solid electrolyte interphase, the increase in discharge overpotential is only ∼100 mV when compared to cells employing nominally anhydrous electrolytes.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/acs.jpclett.6b00856

    View details for Web of Science ID 000378196000002

    View details for PubMedID 27214400

  • The impact of executive function on response to cognitive behavioral therapy in late-life depression INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY Goodkind, M. S., Gallagher-Thompson, D., Thompson, L. W., Kesler, S. R., Anker, L., Flournoy, J., Berman, M. P., Holland, J. M., O'Hara, R. M. 2016; 31 (4): 334-339

    Abstract

    Late-life depression (LLD) is a common and debilitating condition among older adults. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has strong empirical support for the treatment of depression in all ages, including in LLD. In teaching patients to identify, monitor, and challenge negative patterns in their thinking, CBT for LLD relies heavily on cognitive processes and, in particular, executive functioning, such as planning, sequencing, organizing, and selectively inhibiting information. It may be that the effectiveness of CBT lies in its ability to train these cognitive areas.Participants with LLD completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery before enrolling in CBT. The current study examined the relationship between neuropsychological function prior to treatment and response to CBT.When using three baseline measures of executive functioning that quantify set shifting, cognitive flexibility, and response inhibition to predict treatment response, only baseline Wisconsin Card Sort Task performance was associated with a significant drop in depression symptoms after CBT. Specifically, worse performance on the Wisconsin Card Sort Task was associated with better treatment response.These results suggest that CBT, which teaches cognitive techniques for improving psychiatric symptoms, may be especially beneficial in LLD if relative weaknesses in specific areas of executive functioning are present. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/gps.4325

    View details for Web of Science ID 000372192200002

  • The impact of executive function on response to cognitive behavioral therapy in late-life depression. International journal of geriatric psychiatry Goodkind, M. S., Gallagher-Thompson, D., Thompson, L. W., Kesler, S. R., Anker, L., Flournoy, J., Berman, M. P., Holland, J. M., O'Hara, R. M. 2016; 31 (4): 334-339

    Abstract

    Late-life depression (LLD) is a common and debilitating condition among older adults. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has strong empirical support for the treatment of depression in all ages, including in LLD. In teaching patients to identify, monitor, and challenge negative patterns in their thinking, CBT for LLD relies heavily on cognitive processes and, in particular, executive functioning, such as planning, sequencing, organizing, and selectively inhibiting information. It may be that the effectiveness of CBT lies in its ability to train these cognitive areas.Participants with LLD completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery before enrolling in CBT. The current study examined the relationship between neuropsychological function prior to treatment and response to CBT.When using three baseline measures of executive functioning that quantify set shifting, cognitive flexibility, and response inhibition to predict treatment response, only baseline Wisconsin Card Sort Task performance was associated with a significant drop in depression symptoms after CBT. Specifically, worse performance on the Wisconsin Card Sort Task was associated with better treatment response.These results suggest that CBT, which teaches cognitive techniques for improving psychiatric symptoms, may be especially beneficial in LLD if relative weaknesses in specific areas of executive functioning are present. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/gps.4325

    View details for PubMedID 26230057

  • Clinical Gerontologist: Reflections on its Past, Present, and Future CLINICAL GERONTOLOGIST Moye, J., Gallagher-Thompson, D., Thompson, L. 2016; 39 (2): 85–89
  • Composition of conglomerates analyzed by the Curiosity rover: Implications for Gale Crater crust and sediment sources JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-PLANETS Mangold, N., Thompson, L. M., Forni, O., Williams, A. J., Fabre, C., Le Deit, L., Wiens, R. C., WILLIAMS, R., Anderson, R. B., Blaney, D. L., Calef, F., Cousin, A., Clegg, S. M., Dromart, G., Dietrich, W. E., Edgett, K. S., Fisk, M. R., Gasnault, O., Gellert, R., Grotzinger, J. P., Kah, L., Le Mouelic, S., McLennan, S. M., Maurice, S., Meslin, P., Newsom, H. E., Palucis, M. C., Rapin, W., Sautter, V., Siebach, K. L., Stack, K., Sumner, D., YINGST, A. 2016; 121 (3): 353-387
  • Treatment Preferences of Older Adults with Substance Use Problems CLINICAL GERONTOLOGIST Holland, J. M., Rozalski, V., Beckman, L., Rakhkovskaya, L. M., Klingspon, K. L., Donohue, B., Williams, C., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2016; 39 (1): 15-24
  • California Older Persons Pleasant Events Scale: a Tool to Help Older Adults Increase Positive Experiences CLINICAL GERONTOLOGIST Rider, K. L., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2016; 39 (1): 64-83
  • Flexible Ion-Conducting Composite Membranes for Lithium Batteries ADVANCED ENERGY MATERIALS Aetukuri, N. B., Kitajima, S., Jung, E., Thompson, L. E., Virwani, K., Reich, M., Kunze, M., Schneider, M., Schmidbauer, W., Wilcke, W. W., Bethune, D. S., Scott, J. C., Miller, R. D., Kim, H. 2015; 5 (14)
  • BOUNDED GAPS BETWEEN PRIMES IN NUMBER FIELDS AND FUNCTION FIELDS PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY Castillo, A., Hall, C., Oliver, R. J., Pollack, P., Thompson, L. 2015; 143 (7): 2841-2856
  • Physics potential of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment using a J-PARC neutrino beam and Hyper-Kamiokande PROGRESS OF THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS Abe, K., Aihara, H., Andreopoulos, C., Anghel, I., Ariga, A., Ariga, T., Asfandiyarov, R., Askins, M., Back, J. J., Ballett, P., Barbi, M., Barker, G. J., Barr, G., Bay, F., Beltrame, P., Berardi, V., Bergevin, M., Berkman, S., Berry, T., Bhadra, S., Blaszczyk, F. D., Blondel, A., Bolognesi, S., Boyd, S. B., Bravar, A., BRONNER, C., Cafagna, F. S., Carminati, G., Cartwright, S. L., Catanesi, M. G., Choi, K., Choi, J. H., Collazuol, G., Cowan, G., Cremonesi, L., Davies, G., De Rosa, G., Densham, C., Detwiler, J., Dewhurst, D., Di Lodovico, F., Di Luise, S., Drapier, O., Emery, S., EREDITATO, A., Fernandez, P., Feusels, T., Finch, A., Fitton, M., Friend, M., Fujii, Y., Fukuda, Y., Fukuda, D., Galymov, V., Ganezer, K., Gonin, M., Gumplinger, P., Hadley, D. R., Haegel, L., Haesler, A., Haga, Y., Hartfiel, B., Hartz, M., Hayato, Y., Hierholzer, M., Hill, J., Himmel, A., Hirota, S., Horiuchi, S., Huang, K., Ichikawa, A. K., Iijima, T., Ikeda, M., Imber, J., Inoue, K., Insler, J., Intonti, R. A., Irvine, T., Ishida, T., Ishino, H., Ishitsuka, M., Itow, Y., Izmaylov, A., Jamieson, B., JANG, H. I., Jiang, M., Joo, K. K., Jung, C. K., KABOTH, A., Kajita, T., Kameda, J., Karadhzov, Y., Katori, T., Kearns, E., Khabibullin, M., Khotjantsev, A., Kim, J. Y., Kim, S. B., Kishimoto, Y., Kobayashi, T., Koga, M., Konaka, A., Kormos, L. L., Korzenev, A., Koshio, Y., Kropp, W. R., Kudenko, Y., Kutter, T., Kuze, M., Labarga, L., Lagoda, J., Laveder, M., Lawe, M., Learned, J. G., Lim, I. T., Lindner, T., Longhin, A., Ludovici, L., Ma, W., Magaletti, L., Mahn, K., Malek, M., Mariani, C., Marti, L., Martin, J. F., Martin, C., Martins, P. P., Mazzucato, E., McCauley, N., McFarland, K. S., McGrew, C., Mezzetto, M., Minakata, H., Minamino, A., Mine, S., Mineev, O., Miura, M., Monroe, J., Mori, T., Moriyama, S., Mueller, T., Muheim, F., Nakahata, M., Nakamura, K., Nakaya, T., Nakayama, S., Needham, M., Nicholls, T., Nirkko, M., Nishimura, Y., Noah, E., Nowak, J., Nunokawa, H., O'Keeffe, H. M., Okajima, Y., Okumura, K., Oser, S. M., O'Sullivan, E., Ovsiannikova, T., Owen, R. A., Oyama, Y., Perez, J., PAC, M. Y., Palladino, V., Palomino, J. L., Paolone, V., Payne, D., Perevozchikov, O., Perkin, J. D., Pistillo, C., Playfer, S., Posiadala-Zezula, M., Poutissou, J., Quilain, B., Quinto, M., Radicioni, E., Ratoff, P. N., Ravonel, M., Rayner, M. A., Redij, A., Retiere, F., Riccio, C., Richard, E., Rondio, E., Rose, H. J., Ross-Lonergan, M., Rott, C., ROUNTREE, S. D., Rubbia, A., Sacco, R., Sakuda, M., Sanchez, M. C., Scantamburlo, E., Scholberg, K., Scott, M., Seiya, Y., Sekiguchi, T., Sekiya, H., Shaikhiev, A., Shimizu, I., Shiozawa, M., Short, S., Sinnis, G., Smy, M. B., Sobczyk, J., Sobel, H. W., Stewart, T., Stone, J. L., Suda, Y., Suzuki, Y., Suzuki, A. T., Svoboda, R., Tacik, R., Takeda, A., Taketa, A., Takeuchi, Y., Tanaka, H. A., Tanaka, H. K., Tanaka, H., Terri, R., Thompson, L. F., Thorpe, M., Tobayama, S., Tolich, N., Tomura, T., Touramanis, C., Tsukamoto, T., Tzanov, M., Uchida, Y., Vagins, M. R., Vasseur, G., Vogelaar, R. B., Walter, C. W., Wark, D., Wascko, M. O., Weber, A., Wendell, R., Wilkes, R. J., Wilking, M. J., Wilson, J. R., Xin, T., Yamamoto, K., Yanagisawa, C., Yano, T., Yen, S., Yershov, N., Yokoyama, M., Zito, M. 2015
  • Effectiveness of a Fotonovela for Reducing Depression and Stress in Latino Dementia Family Caregivers ALZHEIMER DISEASE & ASSOCIATED DISORDERS Gallagher-Thompson, D., Tzuang, M., Hinton, L., Alvarez, P., Rengifo, J., Valverde, I., Chen, N., Emrani, T., Thompson, L. W. 2015; 29 (2): 146-153

    Abstract

    The clinical need to address stress and depression in Latino dementia caregivers (CGs) combined with low health literacy and less accurate knowledge of dementia motivated the development of a pictorial tool [called a fotonovela (FN)] to teach (a) coping skills for caregiver (CG) stress; (b) self-assessment of depression; and (c) encourage improved utilization of available resources. To test the effectiveness of the FN, 110 of 147 Latino CGs, who were randomly assigned to the Fotonovela Condition (FNC) or the Usual Information Condition (UIC), were included in the final analyses. Self-report measures were given at baseline and post intervention. Results showed that FNC CGs demonstrated significantly greater reductions in level of depressive symptoms than UIC CGs. A significant decrease in level of stress due to memory and behavioral problems exhibited by their loved ones was similar in both groups. The FNC CGs reported that the FN was more helpful and that they referred to it more often than the UIC CGs did with regard to the informational materials they were provided about dementia. In conclusion, a culturally tailored FN can be an effective tool for Latino CGs given their high unmet needs for assistance and various barriers in accessing resources.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000354889200007

    View details for PubMedID 25590939

  • Neutrino oscillation physics potential of the T2K experiment PROGRESS OF THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS Abe, K., Adam, J., Aihara, H., Akiri, T., Andreopoulos, C., Aoki, S., Ariga, A., Assylbekov, S., Autiero, D., Barbi, M., Barker, G. J., Barr, G., Bartet-Friburg, P., BASS, M., Batkiewicz, M., Bay, F., Berardi, V., Berger, B. E., Berkman, S., Bhadra, S., Blaszczyk, F. D., Blondel, A., Bojechko, C., Bordoni, S., Boyd, S. B., Brailsford, D., Bravar, A., BRONNER, C., Buchanan, N., Calland, R. G., Rodriguez, J. C., Cartwright, S. L., Castillo, R., Catanesi, M. G., Cervera, A., Cherdack, D., Christodoulou, G., Clifton, A., Coleman, J., Coleman, S. J., Collazuol, G., CONNOLLY, K., Cremonesi, L., Dabrowska, A., Danko, I., Das, R., Davis, S., de Perio, P., De Rosa, G., Dealtry, T., Dennis, S. R., Densham, C., Dewhurst, D., Di Lodovico, F., Di Luise, S., Drapier, O., Duboyski, T., Duffy, K., Dumarchez, J., Dytman, S., Dziewiecki, M., Emery-Schrenk, S., EREDITATO, A., Escudero, L., Feusels, T., Finch, A. J., Fiorentini, G. A., Friend, M., Fujii, Y., Fukuda, Y., Furmanski, A. P., Galymov, V., Garcia, A., Giffin, S., Giganti, C., GILJE, K., Goeldi, D., Golan, T., Gonin, M., Grant, N., Gudin, D., Hadley, D. R., Haegel, L., Haesler, A., HAIGH, M. D., Hamilton, P., Hansen, D., Hara, T., Hartz, M., Hasegawa, T., Hastings, N. C., Hayashino, T., Hayato, Y., Hearty, C., Helmer, R. L., Hierholzer, M., Hignight, J., Hillairet, A., Himmel, A., Hiraki, T., Hirota, S., Holeczek, J., Horikawa, S., Huang, K., Ichikawa, A. K., Ieki, K., Ieva, M., Ikeda, M., Imber, J., Insler, J., Irvine, T. J., Ishida, T., Ishii, T., Iwai, E., Iwamoto, K., Iyogi, K., Izmaylov, A., Jacob, A., Jamieson, B., Johnson, R. A., JOHNSON, S., Jo, J. H., Jonsson, P., Jung, C. K., Kabirnezhad, M., Kaboth, A. C., Kajita, T., Kakuno, H., Kameda, J., Kanazawa, Y., Karlen, D., Karpikov, I., Katori, T., Kearns, E., Khabibullin, M., Khotjantsev, A., Kielczewska, D., Kikawa, T., Kilinski, A., Kim, J., King, S., Kisiel, J., Kitching, P., Kobayashi, T., Koch, L., Koga, T., Kolaceke, A., Konaka, A., Kormos, L. L., Korzenev, A., Koshio, Y., Kropp, W., Kubo, H., Kudenko, Y., Kurjata, R., Kutter, T., Lagoda, J., Laihem, K., Lamont, I., Larkin, E., Laveder, M., Lawe, M., Lazos, M., Lindner, T., Lister, C., Litchfield, R. P., Longhin, A., Lopez, J. P., Ludovici, L., Magaletti, L., Mahn, K., Malek, M., Manly, S., Marino, A. D., Marteau, J., Martin, J. F., Martins, P., Martynenko, S., Maruyama, T., Matveev, V., Mavrokoridis, K., Mazzucato, E., McCarthy, M., McCauley, N., McFarland, K. S., McGrew, C., Mefodiev, A., Metelko, C., Mezzetto, M., Mijakowski, P., Miller, C. A., Minamino, A., Mineev, O., Missert, A., Miura, M., Moriyama, S., Mueller, T. A., Murakami, A., Murdoch, M., Murphy, S., Myslik, J., Nakadaira, T., Nakahata, M., NAKAMURA, K. G., Nakamura, K., Nakayama, S., Nakaya, T., Nakayoshi, K., Nantais, C., Nielsen, C., Nirkko, M., Nishikawa, K., Nishimura, Y., Nowak, J., O'Keeffe, H. M., Ohta, R., Okumura, K., Okusawa, T., Oryszczak, W., Oser, S. M., Ovsyannikova, T., Owen, R. A., Oyama, Y., Palladino, V., Palomino, J. L., Paolone, V., Payne, D., Perevozchikov, O., Perkin, J. D., Petrov, Y., PICKARD, L., Guerra, E. S., Pistillo, C., PLONSKI, P., Poplawska, E., Popov, B., Posiadala-Zezula, M., Poutissou, J., Poutissou, R., Przewlocki, P., Quilain, B., Radicioni, E., Ratoff, P. N., Ravonel, M., Rayner, M. A., Redij, A., Reeves, M., Reinherz-Aronis, E., Riccio, C., Rodrigues, P. A., ROJAS, P., Rondio, E., Roth, S., Rubbia, A., Ruterbories, D., Sacco, R., Sakashita, K., Sanchez, F., Sato, F., Scantamburlo, E., Scholberg, K., Schoppmann, S., Schwehr, J., Scott, M., Seiya, Y., Sekiguchi, T., Sekiya, H., Sgalaberna, D., Shah, R., SHAKER, F., Shiozawa, M., Short, S., Shustrov, Y., Sinclair, P., Smith, B., Smy, M., Sobczyk, J. T., Sobel, H., Sorel, M., Southwell, L., Stamoulis, P., Steinmann, J., Still, B., Suda, Y., Suzuki, A., Suzuki, K., Suzuki, S. Y., Suzuki, Y., Tacik, R., Tada, M., Takahashi, S., Takeda, A., Takeuchi, Y., Tanaka, H. K., Tanaka, H. A., Tanaka, M. M., Terhorst, D., Terri, R., Thompson, L. F., Thorley, A., Tobayama, S., Toki, W., Tomura, T., Totsuka, Y., Touramanis, C., Tsukamoto, T., Tzanov, M., Uchida, Y., Vacheret, A., Vagins, M., Vasseur, G., Wachala, T., Waldron, A. V., Wakamatsu, K., Walter, C. W., Wark, D., Warzycha, W., Wascko, M. O., Weber, A., Wendell, R., Wilkes, R. J., Wilking, M. J., Wilkinson, C., Williamson, Z., Wilson, J. R., Wilson, R. J., Wongjirad, T., Yamada, Y., Yamamoto, K., Yanagisawa, C., Yano, T., Yen, S., Yershov, N., Yokoyama, M., Yoshida, K., Yuan, T., Yu, M., Zalewska, A., Zalipska, J., ZAMBELLI, L., Zaremba, K., Ziembicki, M., Zimmerman, E. D., Zito, M., Zmuda, J. 2015
  • fMRI Activation During Executive Function Predicts Response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Older, Depressed Adults AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY Thompson, D. G., Kesler, S. R., Sudheimer, K., Mehta, K. M., Thompson, L. W., Marquett, R. M., Holland, J. M., Reiser, R., Rasgon, N., Schatzberg, A., O'Hara, R. M. 2015; 23 (1): 13-22

    Abstract

    To test our hypothesis that pre-treatment executive function and brain regional activation during executive function would discriminate between responders and non-responders to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in elderly depressed outpatients.Clinical cohort study.University-affiliated hospital.Sixty outpatients (age 59 years and older) completed 12 weeks of CBT between July 2010 and December 2011. Forty-four completed fMRI procedures.The main outcome consisted of a conversion from a clinical diagnosis (Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview) of depression to no clinical diagnosis of depression or a significant improvement in diagnostic criteria. Brain activation measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging during the Wisconsin Card Sorting task (WCST) was the primary predictor variable.67% of patients had a positive response to CBT. Decreased activation in the left inferior frontal triangle and right superior frontal gyrus as well as increased activity in the right middle frontal gyrus and left superior frontal gyrus predicted a positive response to CBT. Demographic and neurocognitive measures of WCST performance were not significant predictors of a positive CBT outcome, whereas the measure of WCST-induced activity in the prefrontal cortex was a significant predictor.These data are among the first to suggest that measures of prefrontal brain activation during executive functioning predict response to CBT in older adults. Further exploration of the specific underlying processes that these prefrontal cortical regions are engaging that contributes to better CBT outcomes is warranted in larger, randomized studies.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jagp.2014.02.001

    View details for Web of Science ID 000346204400003

    View details for PubMedID 24656506

  • Do Manualized Treatments for Depression Reduce Insomnia Symptoms? JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Yon, A., Scogin, F., DiNapoli, E. A., McPherron, J., Arean, P. A., Bowman, D., Jamison, C. S., Karpe, J. A., Latour, D., Reynolds, C. F., Rohen, N., Pardini, J. E., Thompson, L. W. 2014; 70 (7): 616-630

    Abstract

    Researchers evaluated the effect of manualized treatments for depression on comorbid symptoms of insomnia.Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze archival data collected from 14 studies (N = 910) examining the efficacy of psychological treatments for depression in adults.Participants receiving a psychological treatment for depression experienced significantly more relief from symptoms of insomnia with overall, early-, middle-, and late-night sleep than those not receiving such treatment.Symptoms of insomnia in those with an average (or lower) level of depression can be reduced through psychological treatment for depression. However, more severe depressive symptoms do not receive great relief from sleep disturbance and may require an additional treatment component targeting symptoms of insomnia.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/jclp.22062

    View details for Web of Science ID 000337623800002

    View details for PubMedID 24596077

  • Potential Vorticity Dynamics of Tropical Instability Vortices JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY Holmes, R. M., Thomas, L. N., Thompson, L., Darr, D. 2014; 44 (3): 995-1011
  • A Pilot of an Intervention Delivered to Chinese- and Spanish-Speaking Carers of People With Dementia in Australia AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMERS DISEASE AND OTHER DEMENTIAS Leone, D., Carragher, N., Santalucia, Y., Draper, B., Thompson, L. W., Shanley, C., Mollina, A., Chen, L., Kyriazopoulos, H., Thompson, D. G. 2014; 29 (1): 32-37

    Abstract

    There are limited language- and culture-specific support programs for carers of people with dementia living in Australia. A group intervention for use with Chinese and Spanish speakers in the United States was adapted to the Australian context, and a pilot study was undertaken with these 2 communities. The intervention is based on a cognitive behavioral therapy approach and was delivered by bilingual health professionals. The adapted material comprised 7 sessions, spanning 2 hours in duration. All 22 participants completed the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-Short form (DASS-21) pre- and postintervention. A significant decrease in depression, anxiety, and stress was observed among Spanish speakers; a significant decrease in depression and anxiety was present among the Chinese speakers. The implications are considered in the context of Australia's changing aged care service system.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000331463000005

    View details for PubMedID 24085251

  • Recent Results from the T2K Experiment 9th International Symposium on Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (CosPA) Abe, K., Abgrall, N., Aihara, H., Akiri, T., Andreopoulos, C., Aoki, S., Ariga, A., Ariga, T., Assylbekov, S., Autiero, D., Barbi, M., Barker, G. J., Barr, G., Bassi, M., Batkiewicz, M., Bay, F., Bentham, S. W., Berardi, V., Berger, B. E., Berkman, S., Bertram, I., Bhadra, S., Blaszczyk, F. D., Blondel, A., Bojechko, C., Boyd, S. B., Brailsford, D., Bravar, A., BRONNER, C., Buchanan, N., Calland, R. G., Caravaca Rodriguez, J., Cartwright, S. L., Castillo, R., Catanesi, M. G., Cervera, A., Cherdack, D., Christodoulou, G., Clifton, A., Coleman, J., Coleman, S. J., Collazuol, G., CONNOLLY, K., Cremonesi, L., Curioni, A., Dabrowska, A., Danko, I., Das, R., Davisf, S., de Perio, P., De Rosa, G., Dealtry, T., Dennis, S. R., Densham, C., Di Lodovico, F., Di Luise, S., Drapier, O., Duboyski, T., Dufour, F., Dumarchez, J., Dytman, S., Dziewiecki, M., Emery, S., EREDITATO, A., Escudero, L., Finch, A. J., Frank, E., Friend, M., Fujii, Y., Fukuda, Y., Furmanski, A. P., Galymov, V., Gaudin, A., Giffin, S., Giganti, C., GILJE, K., Golan, T., Gomez-Cadenas, J. J., Gonin, M., Grant, N., Gudin, D., Hadley, D. R., Haesler, A., HAIGH, M. D., Hamilton, P., Hansen, D., Hara, T., Hartz, M., Hasegawa, T., Hastings, N. C., Hayato, Y., Hearty, C., Helmer, R. L., Hierholzer, M., Hignight, J., Hillairet, A., Himmel, A., Hiraki, T., Hirota, S., Holeczek, J., Horikawa, S., Huang, K., Ichikawa, A. K., Iekia, K., Ieva, M., Ikeda, M., Imber, J., Insler, J., Irvine, T. J., Ishida, T., Ishii, T., Ives, S. J., Iyogi, K., Izmaylov, A., Jacob, A., Jamieson, B., Johnson, R. A., Jo, J. H., Jonsson, P., Joo, K. K., Jung, C. K., Kaboth, A. C., Kajita, T., Kakuno, H., Kameda, J., Kanazawa, Y., Karlen, D., Karpikov, I., Kearns, E., Khabibullin, M., Khotjantsev, A., Kielczewska, D., Kikawa, T., Kilinski, A., Kim, J., Kim, S. B., Kisierl, J., Kitching, P., Kobayashi, T., Kogan, G., Kolaceke, A., Konaka, A., Kormos, L. L., Korzenev, A., Koseki, K., Koshio, Y., Kreslo, I., Kropp, W., Kubo, H., Kudenko, Y., Kumaratunga, S., Kurjata, R., Kutter, T., Lagoda, J., Laihem, K., Laveder, M., Lame, M., Lazos, M., Lee, K. P., Licciardi, C., Lim, I. T., Lindner, T., Lister, C., Litchfield, R. P., Longhin, A., Lopez, G. D., Ludovici, L., Macaire, M., Magaletti, L., Mahn, K., Malek, M., Manly, S., Marino, A. D., Marteau, J., Martin, J. F., Maruyama, T., Marzec, J., Masliah, P., Mathie, E. L., Matveev, V., Mavrokoridis, K., Mazzucato, E., McCauley, N., McFarland, K. S., McGrew, C., Metelko, C., Mijakowski, P., Miller, C. A., Minamino, A., Mineev, O., Mine, S., Missert, A., Miura, M., Monfregola, L., Moriyama, S., Mueller, T. A., Murakami, A., Murdoch, M., Murphy, S., Myslik, J., Nagasaki, T., Nakadaira, T., Nakahata, M., Nakai, T., Nakamura, K., Nakayama, S., Nakaya, T., Nakayoshi, K., Nielsen, C., Nirkko, M., Nishikawa, K., Nishimura, Y., O'Keeffe, H. M., Ohta, R., Okumura, K., Okusawa, T., Oryszczak, W., Oser, S. M., Otani, M., Owen, R. A., Oyama, Y., PAC, M. Y., Palladino, V., Paolone, V., Payne, D., Pearce, G. F., Perevozchikov, O., Perkin, J. D., Petrov, Y., Pinzon Guerra, E. S., Pistillo, C., PLONSKI, P., Poplawska, E., Popov, B., Posiadala, M., Poutissou, J., Poutissou, R., Przewlocki, P., Quilain, B., Radicioni, E., Ratoff, P. N., Ravonel, M., Rayner, M. A., Redij, A., Reeves, M., Reinherz-Aronis, E., Retiere, F., Robert, A., Rodrigues, P. A., Rondio, E., Roth, S., Rubbia, A., Ruterbories, D., Sacco, R., Sakashita, K., Sanchez, F., Scantamburlo, E., Scholberg, K., Schwehr, J., Scott, M., Seiya, Y., Sekiguchi, T., Sekiya, H., Sgalaberna, D., Shiozawa, M., Short, I. S., Shustrov, Y., Sinclair, P., Smith, B., Smith, R. J., Smy, M., Sobczyk, J. T., Sobel, H., Sorel, M., Southwell, L., Stamoulis, P., Steinmann, J., Still, B., Suda, Y., Suzuki, A., Suzuki, K., Suzuki, S. Y., Suzuki, Y., Szeglowski, T., Tacik, R., Tada, M., Takahashi, S., Takeda, A., Takeuchi, Y., Tanaka, H. A., Tanaka, M. M., Taylor, I. J., Terhorst, D., Terri, R., Thompson, L. F., Thorley, A., Tobayama, S., Toki, W., Tomura, T., Totsuka, Y., Touramanis, C., Tsukamoto, T., Tzanov, M., Uchida, Y., Ueno, K., Vacheret, A., Vagins, M., Vasseur, G., Wachala, T., Waldron, A. V., Walter, C. W., Wark, D., Wascko, M. O., Weber, A., Wendell, R., Wilkes, R. J., Wilking, M. J., Wilkinson, C., Williamson, Z., Wilson, J. R., Wilson, R. J., Wongjirad, T., Yamada, Y., Yamamoto, K., Yanagisawa, C., Yen, S., Yershov, N., Yokoyama, M., Yuan, T., Zalewska, A., Zalipska, J., ZAMBELLI, L., Zaremba, K., Ziembicki, M., Zimmerman, E. D., Zito, M., Zmuda, J. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV. 2014: 23–28
  • Reduced Neural Tracking of Prediction Error in Substance-Dependent Individuals AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY Tanabe, J., Reynolds, J., Krmpotich, T., Claus, E., Thompson, L. L., Du, Y. P., Banich, M. T. 2013; 170 (11): 1356-1363

    Abstract

    Substance-dependent individuals make poor decisions on the Iowa Gambling Task, a reward-related decision-making task that involves risk and uncertainty. Task performance depends on several factors, including how sensitive individuals are to feedback and how well they learn based on such feedback. A physiological signal that guides decision making based on feedback is prediction error. The authors investigated whether disruptions in the neural systems underlying prediction error processing in substance-dependent individuals could account for decision-making performance on a modified Iowa Gambling Task.Thirty-two substance-dependent individuals and 30 healthy comparison subjects played a modified version of the Iowa Gambling Task during MR scanning. Trial-to-trial behavior and functional MRI (fMRI) blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal were analyzed using a computational model of prediction error based on internal expectancies. The authors investigated how well BOLD signal tracked prediction error in the striatum and the orbitofrontal cortex as well as over the whole brain in patients relative to comparison subjects.Compared with healthy subjects, substance-dependent patients were less sensitive to loss compared with gain, made less consistent choices, and performed worse on the modified Iowa Gambling Task. The ventral striatum and medial orbitofrontal cortex did not track prediction error as strongly in patients as in healthy subjects.Weaker tracking of prediction error in substance-dependent relative to healthy individuals suggests that altered frontal-striatal error learning signals may underlie decision-making impairments in drug abusers. Computational fMRI may help bridge the knowledge gap between physiology and behavior to inform research aimed at substance abuse treatment.

    View details for DOI 10.1176/appi.ajp.2013.12091257

    View details for Web of Science ID 000326724300018

    View details for PubMedID 23897123

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4426095

  • Interaction between composition and temperature effects on non-bridging oxygen and high-coordinated aluminum in calcium aluminosilicate glasses AMERICAN MINERALOGIST Thompson, L. M., Stebbins, J. F. 2013; 98 (11-12): 1980-1987
  • The Balloon Array for RBSP Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) SPACE SCIENCE REVIEWS Millan, R. M., McCarthy, M. P., Sample, J. G., Smith, D. M., Thompson, L. D., McGaw, D. G., Woodger, L. A., Hewitt, J. G., Comess, M. D., Yando, K. B., Liang, A. X., Anderson, B. A., Knezek, N. R., Rexroad, W. Z., Scheiman, J. M., Bowers, G. S., Halford, A. J., Collier, A. B., Clilverd, M. A., Lin, R. P., Hudson, M. K. 2013; 179 (1-4): 503-530
  • Psychosocial predictors of treatment response to cognitive-behavior therapy for late-life depression: an exploratory study AGING & MENTAL HEALTH Marquett, R. M., Thompson, L. W., Reiser, R. P., Holland, J. M., O'Hara, R. M., Kesler, S. R., Stepanenko, A., Bilbrey, A., Rengifo, J., Majoros, A., Thompson, D. G. 2013; 17 (7): 830-838

    Abstract

    Objective: The primary objective of this study was to examine a variety of potential predictors of response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) in depressed older adults. Method: Sixty older adults with a clinical diagnosis of major or minor depression or dysthymic disorder received 12 individual sessions of CBT over a three- to four-month-period. The BDI-II was administered pre- and post-intervention to assess change in the level of depression. A cutoff score of 13 or less at post was used to determine positive treatment response. A variety of measures (obtained at baseline) were evaluated using hierarchical regression techniques to predict improvement following treatment. Results: Individuals who showed greater improvement were: (a) more open to new experiences; (b) less negatively affected by past stressors; (c) less inclined to have an external locus of control but more likely to cite others as responsible for negative stress in their lives; and (d) were more likely to seek emotional support when symptomatic. Lower education level and reported use of active coping strategies at baseline were associated with less improvement. Other variables (e.g., age, overall physical health, and cognitive status) were not associated with treatment response. Use of logistic regression to predict responders vs. nonresponders yielded a similar pattern. Conclusion: These findings agree with prior research confirming the effectiveness of a brief CBT intervention for older depressed persons and suggest further exploration of several psychosocial factors that may contribute to a stronger response to CBT.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/13607863.2013.791661

    View details for Web of Science ID 000323476600008

    View details for PubMedID 23631698

  • Exploring the effectiveness of an Internet-based program for reducing caregiver distress using the iCare Stress Management e-Training Program AGING & MENTAL HEALTH Kajiyama, B., Thompson, L. W., Eto-Iwase, T., Yamashita, M., Di Mario, J., Tzuang, Y. M., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2013; 17 (5): 544-554

    Abstract

    Determine if the online iCare Stress Management e-Training Program reduces stress, bother, depression, and poor life quality for dementia family caregivers (CGs).CGs (N = 150) were randomly assigned to the iCare Condition (ICC) or to the Education/Information-Only Condition (EOC) for a 3-month period. Change in self-report measures of stress (PSS) (primary outcome), caregiver bother(RMBPC), depression (CES-D), and quality of life (PQOL) (secondary outcomes) was determined, along with usage of new information in one's own caregiving.A mixed ANOVA revealed that change in perceived stress was significant for the ICC but not the EOC (p = .017). Changes in the other measures were not significant. More caregivers in the ICC used the materials in their own caregiving situation than those in the EOC. Roughly one-third of the caregivers enrolled in the study dropped prior to completion.Results are promising, but the high dropout is a concern. Future efforts to improve dropout rate and increase participant engagement are warranted. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to present an evidence-based intervention for CGs via the Internet.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/13607863.2013.775641

    View details for Web of Science ID 000320913300004

    View details for PubMedID 23461355

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC3695021

  • Interactions between network cation coordination and non-bridging oxygen abundance in oxide glasses and melts: Insights from NMR spectroscopy CHEMICAL GEOLOGY Stebbins, J. F., Wu, J., Thompson, L. M. 2013; 346: 34-46
  • Difficulties accepting the loss of a spouse: a precursor for intensified grieving among widowed older adults. Death studies Holland, J. M., Futterman, A., Thompson, L. W., Moran, C., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2013; 37 (2): 126-144

    Abstract

    Previous research has identified three distinct factors that make up the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief-Present (TRIG-Present) scale, which tap into grief related thoughts, emotional response, and nonacceptance regarding a loss. In the present study, the authors sought to identify which of these core grief experiences in the early aftermath of loss are predictive of subsequent intensified grieving. Information was collected from 169 conjugally bereaved older adults at 2- and 12-months following the loss of their spouse. Using a cross-lagged panel design, early experiences of nonacceptance were found to significantly predict more intense grief experiences later on; whereas grief-related thoughts and emotional response were not strongly related to grief at 12-months postloss, after accounting for synchronous (cross-sectional) and autoregressive (stability in the same factor over time) associations. These findings suggest that practitioners working with bereaved clients should pay close attention to early expressions of nonacceptance.

    View details for PubMedID 24520845

  • Difficulties Accepting the Loss of a Spouse: A Precursor for Intensified Grieving Among Widowed Older Adults DEATH STUDIES Holland, J. M., Futterman, A., Thompson, L. W., Moran, C., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2013; 37 (2): 126-144

    Abstract

    Previous research has identified three distinct factors that make up the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief-Present (TRIG-Present) scale, which tap into grief related thoughts, emotional response, and nonacceptance regarding a loss. In the present study, the authors sought to identify which of these core grief experiences in the early aftermath of loss are predictive of subsequent intensified grieving. Information was collected from 169 conjugally bereaved older adults at 2- and 12-months following the loss of their spouse. Using a cross-lagged panel design, early experiences of nonacceptance were found to significantly predict more intense grief experiences later on; whereas grief-related thoughts and emotional response were not strongly related to grief at 12-months postloss, after accounting for synchronous (cross-sectional) and autoregressive (stability in the same factor over time) associations. These findings suggest that practitioners working with bereaved clients should pay close attention to early expressions of nonacceptance.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/07481187.2011.617489

    View details for Web of Science ID 000313615600002

  • Measurements of the T2K neutrino beam properties using the INGRID on-axis near detector NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Abe, K., Abgrall, N., Ajima, Y., Aihara, H., Albert, J. B., Andreopoulos, C., Andrieu, B., Anerella, M. D., Aoki, S., ARAOKA, O., Argyriades, J., Ariga, A., Ariga, T., Assylbekov, S., Autiero, D., Badertscher, A., Barbi, M., Barker, G. J., Barr, G., BASS, M., Batkiewicz, M., Bay, F., BENTHAM, S., Berardi, V., Berger, B. E., Bertram, I., Besnier, M., Beucher, J., Beznosko, D., Bhadra, S., Blaszczyk, F. D., Blocki, J., Blondel, A., Bojechko, C., Bouchez, J., Boyd, S. B., Bravar, A., BRONNER, C., Brook-Roberge, D. G., Buchanan, N., Budd, H., Calvet, D., Cartwright, S. L., Carver, A., Castillo, R., Catanesi, M. G., Cazes, A., Cervera, A., Chavez, C., Choi, S., Christodoulou, G., Coleman, J., Collazuol, G., Coleman, W., CONNOLLY, K., Curioni, A., Dabrowska, A., Danko, I., Das, R., Davies, G. S., Davis, S., Day, M., De Rosa, G., de Andre, J. P., de Perio, P., Dealtry, T., Delbart, A., Densham, C., Di Lodovico, F., Di Luise, S., Tran, P. D., Dobson, J., Dore, U., Drapier, O., Dufour, F., Dumarchez, J., Dytman, S., Dziewiecki, M., Dziomba, M., Emery, S., EREDITATO, A., Escallier, J. E., Escudero, L., Esposito, L. S., Fechner, M., Ferrero, A., Finch, A. J., Frank, E., Fujii, Y., Fukuda, Y., Galymov, V., GANETIS, G. L., Gannaway, F. C., Gaudin, A., Gendotti, A., George, M., Giffin, S., Giganti, C., GILJE, K., Ghosh, A. K., Golan, T., Goldhaber, M., Gomez-Cadenas, J. J., Gomi, S., Gonin, M., Grant, N., Grant, A., Gumplinger, P., Guzowski, P., Haesler, A., HAIGH, M. D., Hamano, K., Hansen, C., Hansen, D., Hara, T., Harrison, P. F., Hartfiel, B., Hartz, M., Haruyama, T., Hasegawa, T., Hastings, N. C., Hatzikoutelis, A., Hayashi, K., Hayato, Y., Hearty, C., Helmer, R. L., Henderson, R., Higashi, N., Hignight, J., Hillairet, A., Hirose, E., Holeczek, J., Horikawa, S., HYNDMAN, A., Ichikawa, A. K., Ieki, K., Ieva, M., Iida, M., Ikeda, M., ILIC, J., Imber, J., Ishida, T., Ishihara, C., Ishii, T., Ives, S. J., Iwasaki, M., Iyogi, K., Izmaylov, A., Jamieson, B., Johnson, R. A., Joo, K. K., Jover-Manas, G. V., Jung, C. K., Kaji, H., Kajita, T., Kakuno, H., Kameda, J., Kaneyuki, K., Karlen, D., Kasami, K., Kato, I., Kawamuko, H., Kearns, E., Khabibullin, M., Khanam, F., Khotjantsev, A., Kielczewska, D., Kikawa, T., Kim, J., Kim, J. Y., Kim, S. B., Kimura, N., Kirby, B., Kisiel, J., Kitching, P., Kobayashi, T., Kogan, G., Koike, S., Konaka, A., Kormos, L. L., Korzenev, A., Koseki, K., Koshio, Y., Kouzuma, Y., Kowalik, K., Kravtsov, V., Kreslo, I., Kropp, W., Kubo, H., Kubota, J., Kudenko, Y., Kulkarni, N., Kurimoto, Y., Kurjata, R., Kutter, T., Lagoda, J., Laihem, K., Laveder, M., Lee, K. P., Le, P. T., Levy, J. M., Licciardi, C., Lim, I. T., Lindner, T., Litchfield, R. P., Litos, M., Longhin, A., Lopez, G. D., Loverre, P. F., Ludovici, L., Lux, T., Macaire, M., Mahn, K., Makida, Y., Malek, M., Manly, S., Marchionni, A., Marino, A. D., Marone, A. J., Marteau, J., Martin, J. F., Maruyama, T., Maryon, T., Marzec, J., Masliah, P., Mathie, E. L., Matsumura, C., Matsuoka, K., Matveev, V., Mavrokoridis, K., Mazzucato, E., McCauley, N., McFarland, K. S., McGrew, C., MCLACHLAN, T., Messina, M., Metcalf, W., Metelko, C., Mezzetto, M., Mijakowski, P., Miller, C. A., Minamino, A., Mineev, O., Mine, S., Missert, A. D., Mituka, G., Miura, M., Mizouchi, K., Monfregola, L., Moreau, F., Morgan, B., Moriyama, S., Muir, A., Murakami, A., MURATORE, J. F., Murdoch, M., Murphy, S., Myslik, J., Nagai, N., Nakadaira, T., Nakahata, M., Nakai, T., Nakajima, K., Nakamoto, T., Nakamura, K., Nakayama, S., Nakaya, T., Naples, D., Navin, M. L., Nelson, B., Nicholls, T. C., Nielsen, C., Nishikawa, K., Nishino, H., Nitta, K., Nobuhara, T., Nowak, J. A., Obayashi, Y., Ogitsu, T., Ohhata, H., Okamura, T., Okumura, K., Okusawa, T., Oser, S. M., Otani, M., Owen, R. A., Oyama, Y., OZAKI, T., PAC, M. Y., Palladino, V., Paolone, V., Paul, P., Payne, D., Pearce, G. F., Perkin, J. D., Pettinacci, V., Pierre, F., Poplawska, E., Popov, B., Posiadala, M., Poutissou, J., Poutissou, R., Przewlocki, P., Qian, W., Raaf, J. L., Radicioni, E., Ratoff, P. N., Raufer, T. M., Ravonel, M., Raymond, M., Retiere, F., Robert, A., Rodrigues, P. A., Rondio, E., Roney, J. M., Rossi, B., Roth, S., Rubbia, A., Ruterbories, D., Sabouri, S., Sacco, R., Sakashita, K., Sanchez, F., Sarrat, A., Sasaki, K., Scholberg, K., Schwehr, J., Scott, M., Scully, D. I., Seiya, Y., Sekiguchi, T., Sekiya, H., Shibata, M., Shimizu, Y., Shiozawa, M., Short, S., Siyad, M., Smith, R. J., Smy, M., Sobczyk, J. T., Sobel, H., Sorel, M., Stahl, A., Stamoulis, P., Steinmann, J., Still, B., Stone, J., Stodulski, M., Strabel, C., Sulej, R., Suzuki, A., Suzuki, K., Suzuki, S., Suzuki, S. Y., Suzuki, Y., Suzuki, Y., Swierblewski, J., Szeglowski, T., Szeptycka, M., Tacik, R., Tada, M., Taguchi, M., Takahashi, S., Takeda, A., Takenaga, Y., Takeuchi, Y., Tanaka, K., Tanaka, H. A., Tanaka, M., Tanaka, M. M., Tanimoto, N., Tashiro, K., Taylor, I., Terashima, A., Terhorst, D., Terri, R., Thompson, L. F., Thorley, A., Toki, W., Tobayama, S., Tomaru, T., Totsuka, Y., Touramanis, C., Tsukamoto, T., Tzanov, M., Uchida, Y., Ueno, K., Vacheret, A., Vagins, M., Vasseur, G., Wachala, T., Walding, J. J., Waldron, A. V., Walter, C. W., Wanderer, P. J., Wang, J., Ward, M. A., Ward, G. P., Wark, D., Wascko, M. O., Weber, A., Wendell, R., West, N., Whitehead, L. H., Wikstroem, G., Wilkes, R. J., Wilking, M. J., Williamson, Z., Wilson, J. R., Wilson, R. J., Wongjirad, T., Yamada, S., Yamada, Y., Yamamoto, A., Yamamoto, K., Yamanoi, Y., Yamaoka, H., Yamauchi, T., Yanagisawa, C., Yano, T., Yen, S., Yershov, N., Yokoyama, M., Yuan, T., Zalewska, A., Zalipska, J., ZAMBELLI, L., Zaremba, K., Ziembicki, M., Zimmerman, E. D., Zito, M., Zmuda, J. 2012; 694: 211-223
  • Estimating accuracy of O-17 NMR measurements in oxide glasses: Constraints and evidence from crystalline and glassy calcium and barium silicates JOURNAL OF NON-CRYSTALLINE SOLIDS Thompson, L. M., McCarty, R. J., Stebbins, J. F. 2012; 358 (22): 2999-3006
  • Non-stoichiometric non-bridging oxygens and five-coordinated aluminum in alkaline earth aluminosilicate glasses: Effect of modifier cation size JOURNAL OF NON-CRYSTALLINE SOLIDS Thompson, L. M., Stebbins, J. F. 2012; 358 (15): 1783-1789
  • Building Better Caregivers: A Pilot Online Support Workshop for Family Caregivers of Cognitively Impaired Adults JOURNAL OF APPLIED GERONTOLOGY Lorig, K., Thompson-Gallagher, D., Traylor, L., Ritter, P. L., Laurent, D. D., Plant, K., Thompson, L. W., Hahn, T. J. 2012; 31 (3): 423-437
  • Common, specific and treatment fit variables in psychotherapy outcome Journal of Psychotherapy Integration Beutler, L. E., Forrester, B., Gallagher-Thompson, D., Thompson, L. W., Tomlins, J. B. 2012; 22 (3): 255-281

    View details for DOI 10.1037/a0029695

  • The T2K experiment NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Abe, K., Abgrall, N., Aihara, H., Ajima, Y., Albert, J. B., Allan, D., Amaudruz, P., Andreopoulos, C., Andrieu, B., Anerella, M. D., Angelsen, C., Aoki, S., ARAOKA, O., Argyriades, J., Ariga, A., Ariga, T., Assylbekov, S., de Andre, J. P., Autiero, D., Badertscher, A., Ballester, O., Barbi, M., Barker, G. J., Baron, P., Barr, G., Bartoszek, L., Batkiewicz, M., Bay, F., BENTHAM, S., Berardi, V., Berger, B. E., Berns, H., Bertram, I., Besnier, M., Beucher, J., Beznosko, D., Bhadra, S., Birney, P., Bishop, D., Blackmore, E., Blaszczyk, F. D., Blocki, J., Blondel, A., Bodek, A., Bojechko, C., Bouchez, J., Boussuge, T., Boyd, S. B., Boyer, M., Braam, H. N., Bradford, R., Bravar, A., Briggs, K., BRINSON, J. D., BRONNER, C., Brook-Roberge, D. G., Bryant, M., Buchanan, N., Budd, H., Cadabeschi, M., Calland, R. G., Calvet, D., Rodriguez, J. C., Carroll, J., Cartwright, S. L., Carver, A., Castillo, R., Catanesi, M. G., CAVATA, C., Cazes, A., Cervera, A., Charrier, J. P., Chavez, C., Choi, S., Chollet, S., Christodoulou, G., Colas, P., Coleman, J., Coleman, W., Collazuol, G., CONNOLLY, K., Cooke, P., Curioni, A., Dabrowska, A., Danko, I., Das, R., Davies, G. S., Davis, S., Day, M., De la Broise, X., de Perio, P., De Rosa, G., Dealtry, T., Debraine, A., Delagnes, E., Delbart, A., Densham, C., Di Lodovico, F., Di Luise, S., Tran, P. D., Dobson, J., Doornbos, J., Dore, U., Drapier, O., Druillole, F., Dufour, F., Dumarchez, J., Durkin, T., Dytman, S., Dziewiecki, M., Dziomba, M., Ellison, B., Emery, S., EREDITATO, A., Escallier, J. E., Escudero, L., Esposito, L. S., Faszer, W., Fechner, M., Ferrero, A., Finch, A., Fisher, C., Fitton, M., FLIGHT, R., Forbush, D., Frank, E., Fransham, K., Fujii, Y., Fukuda, Y., Gallop, M., Galymov, V., GANETIS, G. L., Gannaway, F. C., Gaudin, A., Gaweda, J., Gendotti, A., George, M., Giffin, S., Giganti, C., GILJE, K., Giomataris, I., Giraud, J., Ghosh, A. K., Golan, T., Goldhaber, M., Gomez-Cadenas, J. J., Gomi, S., Gonin, M., Goyette, M., Grant, A., Grant, N., Granena, F., Greenwood, S., Gumplinger, P., Guzowski, P., HAIGH, M. D., Hamano, K., Hansen, C., Hara, T., Harrison, P. F., Hartfiel, B., Hartz, M., Haruyama, T., Hasanen, R., Hasegawa, T., Hastings, N. C., Hastings, S., Hatzikoutelis, A., Hayashi, K., Hayato, Y., Haycock, T. D., Hearty, C., Helmer, R. L., Henderson, R., Herlant, S., Higashi, N., Hignight, J., Hiraide, K., Hirose, E., Holeczek, J., Honkanen, N., Horikawa, S., HYNDMAN, A., Ichikawa, A. K., Ieki, K., Ieva, M., Iida, M., Ikeda, M., ILIC, J., Imber, J., Ishida, T., Ishihara, C., Ishii, T., Ives, S. J., Iwasaki, M., Iyogi, K., Izmaylov, A., Jamieson, B., Johnson, R. A., Joo, K. K., Jover-Manas, G., Jung, C. K., Kaji, H., Kajita, T., Kakuno, H., Kameda, J., Kaneyuki, K., Karlen, D., Kasami, K., Kasey, V., Kato, I., Kawamuko, H., Kearns, E., Kellet, L., Khabibullin, M., KHALEEQ, M., Khan, N., Khotjantsev, A., Kielczewska, D., Kikawa, T., Kim, J. Y., Kim, S., Kimura, N., Kirby, B., Kisiel, J., Kitching, P., Kobayashi, T., Kogan, G., Koike, S., Komorowski, T., Konaka, A., Kormos, L. L., Korzenev, A., Koseki, K., Koshio, Y., Kouzuma, Y., Kowalik, K., Kravtsov, V., Kreslo, I., Kropp, W., Kubo, H., Kubota, J., Kudenko, Y., Kulkarni, N., Kurchaninov, L., Kurimoto, Y., Kurjata, R., Kurosawa, Y., Kutter, T., Lagoda, J., Laihem, K., Langstaff, R., Laveder, M., Lawson, T. B., Le, P. T., Le Coguie, A., Le Ross, M., Lee, K. P., Lenckowski, M., Licciardi, C., Lim, I. T., Lindner, T., Litchfield, R. P., Longhin, A., Lopez, G. D., Lu, P., Ludovici, L., Lux, T., Macaire, M., Magaletti, L., Mahn, K., Makida, Y., Malafis, C. J., Malek, M., Manly, S., Marchionni, A., Mark, C., Marino, A. D., Marone, A. J., Marteau, J., Martin, J. F., Maruyama, T., Maryon, T., Marzec, J., Masliah, P., Mathie, E. L., Matsumura, C., Matsuoka, K., Matveev, V., Mavrokoridis, K., Mazzucato, E., McCauley, N., McFarland, K. S., McGrew, C., MCLACHLAN, T., Mercer, I., Messina, M., Metcalf, W., Metelko, C., Mezzetto, M., Mijakowski, P., Miller, C. A., Minamino, A., Mineev, O., Mine, S., Minvielle, R. E., Mituka, G., Miura, M., Mizouchi, K., Mols, J., Monfregola, L., Monmarthe, E., Moreau, F., Morgan, B., Moriyama, S., Morris, D., Muir, A., Murakami, A., MURATORE, J. F., Murdoch, M., Murphy, S., Myslik, J., Nagashima, G., Nakadaira, T., Nakahata, M., Nakamoto, T., Nakamura, K., Nakayama, S., Nakaya, T., Naples, D., Nelson, B., Nicholls, T. C., Nishikawa, K., Nishino, H., Nitta, K., Nizery, F., Nowak, J. A., Noy, M., Obayashi, Y., Ogitsu, T., Ohhata, H., Okamura, T., Okumura, K., Okusawa, T., Ohlmann, C., Olchanski, K., Openshaw, R., Oser, S. M., Otani, M., Owen, R. A., Oyama, Y., OZAKI, T., PAC, M. Y., Palladino, V., Paolone, V., Paul, P., Payne, D., Pearce, G. F., Pearson, C., Perkin, J. D., Pfleger, M., Pierre, F., Pierrepont, D., PLONSKI, P., Poffenberger, P., Poplawska, E., Popov, B., Posiadala, M., Poutissou, J., Poutissou, R., Preece, R., Przewlocki, P., Qian, W., Raaf, J. L., Radicioni, E., Ramos, K., Ratoff, P., Raufer, T. M., Ravonel, M., Raymond, M., Retiere, F., Richards, D., Ritou, J., Robert, A., Rodrigues, P. A., Rondio, E., Roney, M., Rooney, M., Ross, D., Rossi, B., Roth, S., Rubbia, A., Ruterbories, D., Sacco, R., Sadler, S., Sakashita, K., Sanchez, F., Sarrat, A., Sasaki, K., Schaack, P., Schmidt, J., Scholberg, K., Schwehr, J., Scott, M., Scully, D. I., Seiya, Y., Sekiguchi, T., Sekiya, H., Sheffer, G., Shibata, M., Shimizu, Y., Shiozawa, M., Short, S., Siyad, M., Smith, D., Smith, R. J., Smy, M., Sobczyk, J., Sobel, H., Sooriyakumaran, S., Sorel, M., Spitz, J., Stahl, A., Stamoulis, P., Star, O., Statter, J., Stawnyczy, L., Steinmann, J., Steffens, J., Still, B., Stodulski, M., Stone, J., Strabel, C., Strauss, T., Sulej, R., Sutcliffe, P., Suzuki, A., Suzuki, K., Suzuki, S., Suzuki, S. Y., Suzuki, Y., Suzuki, Y., Swierblewski, J., Szeglowski, T., Szeptycka, M., Tacik, R., Tada, M., TADEPALLI, A. S., Taguchi, M., Takahashi, S., Takeda, A., Takenaga, Y., Takeuchi, Y., Tanaka, H. A., Tanaka, K., Tanaka, M., Tanaka, M. M., Tanimoto, N., Tashiro, K., Taylor, I. J., Terashima, A., Terhorst, D., Terri, R., Thompson, L. F., Thorley, A., Thorpe, M., Toki, W., Tomaru, T., Totsuka, Y., Touramanis, C., Tsukamoto, T., Tvaskis, V., Tzanov, M., Uchida, Y., Ueno, K., Usseglio, M., Vacheret, A., Vagins, M., Van Schalkwyk, J. F., Vanel, J., Vasseur, G., Veledar, O., Vincent, P., Wachala, T., Waldron, A. V., Walter, C. W., Wanderer, P. J., Ward, M. A., Ward, G. P., Wark, D., Warner, D., Wascko, M. O., Weber, A., Wendell, R., Wendland, J., West, N., Whitehead, L. H., Wikstroem, G., Wilkes, R. J., Wilking, M. J., Williamson, Z., Wilson, J. R., Wilson, R. J., Wong, K., Wongjirad, T., Yamada, S., Yamada, Y., Yamamoto, A., Yamamoto, K., Yamanoi, Y., Yamaoka, H., Yanagisawa, C., Yano, T., Yen, S., Yershov, N., Yokoyama, M., Zalewska, A., Zalipska, J., Zaremba, K., Ziembicki, M., Zimmerman, E. D., Zito, M., Zmuda, J. 2011; 659 (1): 106-135
  • Cortisol Outcomes among Caucasian and Latina/Hispanic Women Caring for a Family Member with Dementia: A Preliminary Examination of Psychosocial Predictors and Effects of a Psychoeducational Intervention STRESS AND HEALTH Holland, J. M., Thompson, L. W., Cucciare, M. A., Tsuda, A., Okamura, H., Spiegel, D., Rasgon, N. L., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2011; 27 (4): 334-346

    View details for DOI 10.1002/smi.1375

    View details for Web of Science ID 000295876000007

  • Understanding Caregiver Health Behaviors: Depressive Symptoms Mediate Caregiver Self-Efficacy and Health Behavior Patterns AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMERS DISEASE AND OTHER DEMENTIAS Rabinowitz, Y. G., Saenz, E. C., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2011; 26 (4): 310-316

    Abstract

    Previous research on female caregivers of elderly relatives with dementia has demonstrated that caregiving self-efficacy (SE) is associated with reduced cumulative health risk. The overarching aim of the current study was to expand on that research by exploring whether depressive symptoms mediate the relationship between 3 domains of caregiving SE and cumulative health risk associated with health behavior patterns. Data from 256 female family caregivers of patients with dementia are presented. Path analysis revealed a significant mediated effect for depressive symptoms as both SE for obtaining respite and SE for controlling upsetting Thoughts had a significant, indirect effect on cumulative health risk. There were no direct effects between caregiver SE and cumulative health risk. The current study sheds light on the complex pathway between caregiver SE and health and speaks to the importance of skills-based interventions designed to enhance efficacy beliefs and minimize depression in dementia caregivers.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/1533317511410557

    View details for Web of Science ID 000292570400006

    View details for PubMedID 21636582

  • Non-bridging oxygen and high-coordinated aluminum in metaluminous and peraluminous calcium and potassium aluminosilicate glasses: High-resolution O-17 and Al-27 MAS NMR results AMERICAN MINERALOGIST Thompson, L. M., Stebbins, J. F. 2011; 96 (5-6): 841-853
  • Is Religious Coping Associated with Cumulative Health Risk? An Examination of Religious Coping Styles and Health Behavior Patterns in Alzheimer's Dementia Caregivers JOURNAL OF RELIGION & HEALTH Rabinowitz, Y. G., Hartlaub, M. G., Saenz, E. C., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2010; 49 (4): 498-512

    Abstract

    The current study explored the relationship between religious coping and cumulative health risk associated with health behavior patterns in a sample of 256 Latina and Caucasian female caregivers of elderly relatives with dementia. Primary analyses examined the relationship between religious coping (both positive and negative) and an overall index of cumulative health risk. Secondary analyses were conducted on the individual health behaviors subsumed in the broader index. Findings revealed that negative religious coping was significantly associated with increased cumulative health risk. Positive religious coping was predictive of decreased cumulative health risk among Latina caregivers but not among Caucasians. Negative religious coping was significantly associated with both an increased likelihood for weight gain and increased dietary restriction. Positive religious coping was associated with decreased likelihood for weight gain in Latinas. Implications for both caregivers and clinicians are discussed.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10943-009-9300-8

    View details for Web of Science ID 000284654500007

    View details for PubMedID 19904608

  • Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Contributes to Myeloid Hyperplasia and Increased Immunoglobulins, But Not Epidermal Hyperplasia, in RabGEF1-Deficient Mice AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PATHOLOGY Tsai, M., Chen, C., Mukai, K., Song, C. H., Thompson, L. J., Ziegler, S. F., Tam, S., Galli, S. J. 2010; 177 (5): 2411-2420

    Abstract

    Mice overexpressing the proallergic cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) in the skin develop a pathology resembling atopic dermatitis. RabGEF1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab5 GTPase, is a negative regulator of IgE-dependent mast cell activation, and Rabgef1-/- and TSLP transgenic mice share many similar phenotypic characteristics, including elevated serum IgE levels and severe skin inflammation, with infiltrates of both lymphocytes and eosinophils. We report here that Rabgef1-/- mice also develop splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, myeloid hyperplasia, and high levels of TSLP. Rabgef1-/-TSLPR-/- mice, which lack TSLP/TSLP receptor (TSLPR) signaling, had levels of blood neutrophils, spleen myeloid cells, and serum IL-4, IgG1, and IgE levels that were significantly reduced compared with those in Rabgef1-/-TSLPR+/+ mice. However, Rabgef1-/-TSLPR-/- mice, like Rag1- or eosinophil-deficient Rabgef1-/- mice, developed cutaneous inflammation and epidermal hyperplasia. Therefore, in Rabgef1-/- mice, TSLP/TSLPR interactions are not required for the development of epidermal hyperplasia but contribute to the striking myeloid hyperplasia and overproduction of immunoglobulins observed in these animals. Our study shows that RabGEF1 can negatively regulate TSLP production in vivo and that excessive production of TSLP contributes to many of the phenotypic abnormalities in Rabgef1-/- mice. However, the marked epidermal hyperplasia, cutaneous inflammation, and increased numbers of dermal mast cells associated with RabGEF1 deficiency can develop via a TSLPR-independent pathway, as well as in the absence of Rag1 or eosinophils.

    View details for DOI 10.2353/ajpath.2010.100181

    View details for Web of Science ID 000284182900028

    View details for PubMedID 20829437

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC2966799

  • Factorial Validity of the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief-Present Scale Among Bereaved Older Adults PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT Futterman, A., Holland, J. M., Brown, P. J., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2010; 22 (3): 675-687

    Abstract

    The Texas Revised Inventory of Grief-Present scale (TRIG-Present) is one of the most widely used grief measures; however, researchers have only empirically examined the validity and underlying factor structure of TRIG-Present scores in a few studies. Hence, in the present investigation, we sought to examine the factorial validity of the TRIG-Present (those scores that index current grief) among 2 samples of bereaved older adults--a community-dwelling sample of 162 individuals who experienced a diverse set of losses in terms of relationship to the deceased and time since loss, and a recently widowed sample of 212 individuals who were assessed at 2-months and 12-months postloss. Across both samples, we found support for a 3-factor model, composed of clusters of items representing Emotional Response, Thoughts, and Nonacceptance regarding a loss. Additionally, this 3-factor model exhibited significant invariance from 2-months to 12-months postloss in the recently widowed sample. Analyses examining the convergent validity of these 3 factors also suggest that this conceptualization of the TRIG-Present could have practical advantages and potentially influence the way in which clinicians and/or researchers assess grief and evaluate bereavement interventions.

    View details for DOI 10.1037/a0019914

    View details for Web of Science ID 000281588600020

    View details for PubMedID 20822280

  • Psychosocial Factors Among Chinese American Women Dementia Caregivers and their Association with Salivary Cortisol: Results of an Exploratory Study AGEING INTERNATIONAL Holland, J. M., Thompson, L. W., Tzuang, M., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2010; 35 (2): 109–27
  • SIRT2 inhibition achieves neuroprotection by decreasing sterol biosynthesis PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Luthi-Carter, R., Taylor, D. M., Pallos, J., Lambert, E., Amore, A., Parker, A., Moffitt, H., Smith, D. L., Runne, H., Gokce, O., Kuhn, A., Xiang, Z., Maxwell, M. M., Reeves, S. A., Bates, G. P., Neri, C., Thompson, L. M., Marsh, J. L., Kazantsev, A. G. 2010; 107 (17): 7927-7932

    Abstract

    Huntington's disease (HD), an incurable neurodegenerative disorder, has a complex pathogenesis including protein aggregation and the dysregulation of neuronal transcription and metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) achieves neuroprotection in cellular and invertebrate models of HD. Genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of SIRT2 in a striatal neuron model of HD resulted in gene expression changes including significant down-regulation of RNAs responsible for sterol biosynthesis. Whereas mutant huntingtin fragments increased sterols in neuronal cells, SIRT2 inhibition reduced sterol levels via decreased nuclear trafficking of SREBP-2. Importantly, manipulation of sterol biosynthesis at the transcriptional level mimicked SIRT2 inhibition, demonstrating that the metabolic effects of SIRT2 inhibition are sufficient to diminish mutant huntingtin toxicity. These data identify SIRT2 inhibition as a promising avenue for HD therapy and elucidate a unique mechanism of SIRT2-inhibitor-mediated neuroprotection. Furthermore, the ascertainment of SIRT2's role in regulating cellular metabolism demonstrates a central function shared with other sirtuin proteins.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1002924107

    View details for Web of Science ID 000277088700059

    View details for PubMedID 20378838

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC2867924

  • Probing the electrical properties of highly-doped Al:ZnO nanowire ensembles JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSICS Noriega, R., Rivnay, J., Goris, L., Kaelblein, D., Klauk, H., Kern, K., Thompson, L. M., Palke, A. C., Stebbins, J. F., Jokisaari, J. R., Kusinski, G., Salleo, A. 2010; 107 (7)

    View details for DOI 10.1063/1.3360930

    View details for Web of Science ID 000276795400081

  • The Coping with Caregiving Group Program for Chinese caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease in Hong Kong PATIENT EDUCATION AND COUNSELING Au, A., Li, S., Lee, K., Leung, P., Pan, P., Thompson, L., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2010; 78 (2): 256-260

    Abstract

    This pilot study evaluated the effectiveness of Coping with Caregiving (CWC) psychoeducational program for Chinese family caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease in Hong Kong.Twenty-seven female primary caregivers were randomized to join the treatment group or wait-list control group. The caregivers in the treatment group participated in 13 weekly training sessions which taught specific cognitive-behavioral strategies to handle caregiving stress.As compared to the wait-list control group, caregivers completing the CWC program demonstrated a significant increase in their self-efficacy for controlling their upsetting thoughts and handling disruptive behaviors of the care recipients. They also reported a significant increase in the use of both problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies.These findings suggested that cognitive-behavioral programs can be effective in improving the resourcefulness of Chinese caregivers of persons with dementia in Hong Kong.Future CWC programs will have to enhance participants' ability to differentiate among various coping skills and to use situation-appropriate strategies.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2009.06.005

    View details for Web of Science ID 000275010300020

    View details for PubMedID 19619974

  • Effectiveness of a psychoeducational skill training DVD program to reduce stress in Chinese American dementia caregivers: Results of a preliminary study AGING & MENTAL HEALTH Gallagher-Thompson, D., Wang, P., Liu, W., Cheung, V., Peng, R., China, D., Thompson, L. W. 2010; 14 (3): 263-273

    Abstract

    Prior research (Gallagher-Thompson, D., Gray, H., Tang, P., Pu, C.-Y., Tse, C., Hsu, S., et al. (2007). Impact of in-home intervention versus telephone support in reducing depression and stress of Chinese caregivers: Results of a pilot study. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 15, 425-434.) found that an in-home behavioral management program, derived conceptually from cognitive behavioral theories (CBT), was effective in reducing caregiver related stress and depressive symptoms in Chinese American dementia caregivers (CGs). Results were promising, but a more cost-effective intervention is needed to serve this growing population. Past work also found that a psychoeducational videotaped training program based on CBT was effective in reducing stress due to caregiving in Caucasian and African American dementia family CGs (Steffen, 2000, Anger management for dementia caregivers: A preliminary study using video and telephone interventions. Behavior Therapy, 31, 281-299.). To date no research has been conducted using a technological medium to deliver a similar kind of intervention to Chinese American caregivers. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a similar but culturally "tailored" program in which 70 CGs were randomly assigned to a 12-week CBT skill training program delivered on a DVD, or to a general educational DVD program on dementia. Both were available in Mandarin Chinese or English as preferred. Pre post change analyses indicated that CGs did not differ on change in level of negative depressive symptoms, but positive affect was higher, and patient behaviors were appraised as less stressful and bothersome, for CGs in the CBT skill training program. They were also more satisfied with the program overall and reported that they believed they were able to give care more effectively. Results encourage further development of theoretically based interventions, delivered using modern technology, for this ever increasing group of CGs.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/13607860903420989

    View details for Web of Science ID 000277438700004

    View details for PubMedID 20425645

  • Transcriptional response in the peripheral blood of patients infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Thompson, L. J., Dunstan, S. J., Dolecek, C., Perkins, T., House, D., Dougan, G., Nguyen Thi Hue, T. H., Tran Thi Phi La, T. P., Du, D. C., Le Thi Phuong, T. P., Nguyen Thi Dung, T. D., Tran Tinh Hien, T. H., Farrar, J. J., Monack, D., Lynn, D. J., Popper, S. J., Falkow, S. 2009; 106 (52): 22433-22438

    Abstract

    We used microarrays and transcriptional profiling of peripheral blood to investigate the host response of 29 individuals who contracted typhoid fever in the Mekong Delta region of Vietnam. Samples were taken over a nine month period encompassing acute disease, convalescence, and recovery. We found that typhoid fever induced a distinct and highly reproducible signature in the peripheral blood that changed during treatment and convalescence, returning in the majority of cases to the "normal" profile as measured in healthy uninfected controls. Unexpectedly, there was a strong, distinct signature of convalescence present at day 9 after infection that remained virtually unchanged one month after acute infection and in some cases persisted as long as nine months despite a complete clinical recovery in all patients. Patients who retain the convalescent signature may be genetically or temporarily incapable of developing an effective immune response and may be more susceptible to reinfection, relapse, or the establishment of a carrier state.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0912386106

    View details for Web of Science ID 000273178700071

    View details for PubMedID 20018727

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC2792164

  • Roles of DNA repair and reductase activity in the cytotoxicity of the hypoxia-activated dinitrobenzamide mustard PR-104A MOLECULAR CANCER THERAPEUTICS Gu, Y., Patterson, A. V., Atwell, G. J., Chernikova, S. B., Brown, J. M., Thompson, L. H., Wilson, W. R. 2009; 8 (6): 1714-1723

    Abstract

    PR-104 is a dinitrobenzamide mustard currently in clinical trial as a hypoxia-activated prodrug. Its major metabolite, PR-104A, is metabolized to the corresponding hydroxylamine (PR-104H) and amine (PR-104M), resulting in activation of the nitrogen mustard moiety. We characterize DNA damage responsible for cytotoxicity of PR-104A by comparing sensitivity of repair-defective hamster Chinese hamster ovary cell lines with their repair-competent counterparts. PR-104H showed a repair profile similar to the reference DNA cross-linking agents chlorambucil and mitomycin C, with marked hypersensitivity of XPF(-/-), ERCC1(-/-), and Rad51D(-/-) cells but not of XPD(-/-) or DNA-PK(CS)(-/-) cells. This pattern confirmed the expected dependence on the ERCC1-XPF endonuclease, implicated in unhooking DNA interstrand cross-links at blocked replication forks, and homologous recombination repair (HRR) in restarting collapsed forks. However, even under anoxia, the hypersensitivity of XPF(-/-), ERCC1(-/-), and Rad51D(-/-) cells to PR-104A itself was lower than for chlorambucil. To test whether this reflects inefficient PR-104A reduction, a soluble form of human NADPH:cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase was stably expressed in Rad51D(-/-) cells and their HRR-restored counterpart. This expression increased hypoxic metabolism of PR-104A to PR-104H and PR-104M as well as hypoxia-selective cytotoxicity of PR-104A and its dependence on HRR. We conclude that PR-104A cytotoxicity is primarily due to DNA interstrand cross-linking by its reduced metabolites, although under conditions of inefficient PR-104A reduction (low reductase expression or aerobic cells), a second mechanism contributes to cell killing. This study shows that hypoxia, reductase activity, and DNA interstrand cross-link repair proficiency are key variables that interact to determine PR-104A sensitivity.

    View details for DOI 10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-08-1209

    View details for Web of Science ID 000267043100032

    View details for PubMedID 19509245

  • Roles of DNA repair and reductase activity in the cytotoxicity of the hypoxia-activated dinitrobenzamide mustard PR-104A Gu Yongchuan, Patterson, A., Atwell, G., Chernikova, S., Brown, J., Thompson, L., Wilson, W. AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH. 2009
  • Social support and well-being in dementia family caregivers: The mediating role of self-efficacy AGING & MENTAL HEALTH Au, A., Lai, M., Lau, K., Pan, P., Lam, L., Thompson, L., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2009; 13 (5): 761-768

    Abstract

    The study investigated self-efficacy as a possible mediator of the relationship between the social support and depressive symptoms of primarily informal caregivers, mainly family members, of patients with dementia in Hong Kong.One hundred and thirty-four caregivers were interviewed. Path analyses were conducted using a self-efficacy scale that consists of three subscales assessing three domains of caregiving self-efficacy. Self-efficacy for obtaining respite, responding to disruptive patient behaviours, and controlling upsetting thoughts about caregiving were measured.Results showed that self-efficacy acted as a partial mediator between social support and depressive symptoms of these caregivers.Findings suggest that self-efficacy may function as a mechanism through which social support influences depressive symptoms, and the importance of this self-efficacy mechanism can be domain-specific.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/13607860902918223

    View details for Web of Science ID 000271511800014

    View details for PubMedID 19882415

  • Effectiveness of Cognitive/Behavioral Small Group Intervention for Reduction of Depression and Stress in Non-Hispanic White and Hispanic/Latino Women Dementia Family Caregivers: Outcomes and Mediators of Change. Journal of rational-emotive and cognitive-behavior therapy : RET Gallagher-Thompson, D., Gray, H. L., Dupart, T., Jimenez, D., Thompson, L. W. 2008; 26 (4): 286-303

    Abstract

    This study enrolled 184 middle-aged and older women (95 Non-Hispanic White and 89 Hispanic/Latino) who provided in-home hands-on care to an elderly relative with Alzheimer's disease or another form of dementia. Within ethnic group they were randomly assigned to either a CBT-based small group intervention program called "Coping with Caregiving" (CWC) that taught a variety of cognitive and behavioral skills to reduce stress and depression, or to a minimal telephone based control condition (TSC). Intervention lasted about 4 months; one post-treatment assessment was completed 6 months after baseline by interviewers blind to the intervention condition. Interviews and interventions were conducted in English or Spanish by trained staff. Results indicated that those in the CWC (regardless of ethnicity) showed greater improvement from pre to post intervention than those in the TSC on measures of depressive symptoms, overall life stress, and caregiving-specific stress. In order to investigate if these changes may have been related to one proposed mechanism of change in CBT (skill utilization), a new measure was constructed. Change in frequency of use and perceived helpfulness of adaptive coping skills were assessed in all caregivers. Results indicated that caregivers in CWC reported greater frequency of use, and greater perceived helpfulness, of these skills at post intervention compared to caregivers in the TSC. Improvement measured by dependent measures was correlated with an increase in these indices for those in the CWC. Tests for mediation suggest that effective skill utilization may mediate the effect of treatment on outcome. Implications of these findings are discussed and recommendations provided for future research.

    View details for PubMedID 25067886

  • The benefits of using psychotherapy skills following treatment for depression: An examination of "afterwork" and a test of the skills hypothesis in older adults COGNITIVE AND BEHAVIORAL PRACTICE Powers, D. V., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2008; 15 (2): 194-202
  • The relationship self-efficacy and between cumulative health risk associated with health behavior patterns in female caregivers of elderly relatives with Alzheimer's dementia JOURNAL OF AGING AND HEALTH Rabinowitz, Y. G., Mausbach, B. T., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2007; 19 (6): 946-964

    Abstract

    To promote caregiver well-being and to help caregivers persevere in their invaluable roles, personal resources that predict increased self-care and reduced health risk behaviors need to be identified.This study examined relationships between self-efficacy beliefs in three distinct domains of caregiving and cumulative health risk associated with health behavior patterns.Higher levels of self-efficacy for Obtaining Respite and self-efficacy for Controlling Upsetting Thoughts were found to be related to reduced health risk.These findings suggest that caregivers who believe that they can remove themselves from the stresses of caregiving and who can manage the distorted cognitions often associated with caregiving may experience tangible benefits in health behaviors and, ultimately, improved physical health.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0898264307308559

    View details for Web of Science ID 000251065300005

    View details for PubMedID 18165290

  • Adapting homework for an older adult client with cognitive impairment 35th Annual Congress of the European-Association-of-Behavioural-and-Cognitive-Therapies Coon, D. W., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC. 2007: 252–60
  • Type I interferon signaling is required for activation of the inflammasome during Francisella infection JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE Henry, T., Brotcke, A., Weiss, D. S., Thompson, L. J., Monack, D. M. 2007; 204 (5): 987-994

    Abstract

    Francisella tularensis is a pathogenic bacterium whose virulence is linked to its ability to replicate within the host cell cytosol. Entry into the macrophage cytosol activates a host-protective multimolecular complex called the inflammasome to release the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta and -18 and trigger caspase-1-dependent cell death. In this study, we show that cytosolic F. tularensis subspecies novicida (F. novicida) induces a type I interferon (IFN) response that is essential for caspase-1 activation, inflammasome-mediated cell death, and release of IL-1beta and -18. Extensive type I IFN-dependent cell death resulting in macrophage depletion occurs in vivo during F. novicida infection. Type I IFN is also necessary for inflammasome activation in response to cytosolic Listeria monocytogenes but not vacuole-localized Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium or extracellular adenosine triphosphate. These results show the specific connection between type I IFN signaling and inflammasome activation, which are two sequential events triggered by the recognition of cytosolic bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first example of the positive regulation of inflammasome activation. This connection underscores the importance of the cytosolic recognition of pathogens and highlights how multiple innate immunity pathways interact before commitment to critical host responses.

    View details for DOI 10.1084/jem.20062665

    View details for PubMedID 17452523

  • Impact of in-home behavioral management versus telephone support to reduce depressive symptoms and perceived stress in Chinese caregivers: Results of a pilot study AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY Gallagher-Thompson, D., Gray, H. L., Tang, P. C., Pu, C. Y., Leung, L. Y., Wang, P., Tse, C., Hsu, S., Kwo, E., Tong, H., Long, J., Thompson, L. W. 2007; 15 (5): 425-434

    Abstract

    Recent work has shown that Chinese Americans caring for a family member with dementia experience considerable psychological distress. However, few studies evaluate treatments for them. This study evaluated the efficacy of in-home intervention, based on cognitive behavior therapy principles, to relieve stress and depression in female Chinese American caregivers (CGs).Fifty-five CGs who met inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to a telephone support condition (TSC) or to an in-home behavioral management program (IHBMP) for 4 months. In the TSC, biweekly calls were made and relevant material was mailed. In the IHBMP, specific psychological skills were taught to deal with caregiving stress. CGs were assessed before and after treatment. Outcome measures evaluated overall perceived stress, caregiving-specific stress, and depressive symptoms.CGs in IHBMP were less bothered by caregiving-specific stressors and had lower depression levels than CGs in TSC. There was no difference in overall stress. CGs with low baseline level of self-efficacy for obtaining respite benefited from IHBMP, but showed little improvement in the TSC. CGs with higher self-efficacy benefited from both treatments.This intervention is promising and warrants replication in future studies. Additional research is needed to evaluate longer-term effects and to identify individual differences associated with improvement.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000246299600008

    View details for PubMedID 17463192

  • Recruiting Chinese Americans for dementia caregiver intervention research: Suggestions for success AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY Gallagher-Thompson, D., Rabinowitz, Y., Tang, P. C., Tse, C., Kwo, E., Hsu, S., Wang, P., Leung, L., Tong, H., Thompson, L. W. 2006; 14 (8): 676-683

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to compare the relative effectiveness of three recruitment modalities for enrolling Chinese-American and white family caregivers into research studies to evaluate intervention strategies.A total of 116 Chinese Americans and 134 whites were screened for eligibility to participate in one of two clinical intervention trials. Participants were recruited using: 1) media sources; 2) nonprofessional referral sources; or 3) professional referrals. Each participant was asked an open-ended question about how they became aware of the programs offered.A smaller proportion of Chinese Americans (39%) than whites (50%) who responded to recruiting strategies actually enrolled as subjects. There was a significant interaction between ethnicity and recruitment strategy. Chinese-American caregivers who were recruited by nonprofessional sources were less likely to enroll in the intervention studies than those who were recruited through media sources or professional referrals. Whites, on the other hand, were more likely to be recruited through nonprofessional sources than the other two.A consumer-oriented approach, which included direct face-to-face contact with key community leaders, generated the highest number of Chinese-American participants. Culture-specific factors such as trust-building with social service agencies, demonstrating genuine commitment to the well-being of the target community, and linguistic and ethnic matching between research staff and potential participants appear helpful to successful research recruitment in this rapidly increasing segment of dementia caregivers.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000239205500006

    View details for PubMedID 16861372

  • The moderating effect of self-efficacy on intervention response in women family caregivers of older adults with dementia AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY Rabinowitz, Y. G., Mausbach, B. T., Coon, D. W., Depp, C., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2006; 14 (8): 642-649

    Abstract

    This study performed moderator analyses to determine if self-efficacy predicted differential outcome in a randomized trial comparing a cognitive behavior psychoeducational intervention and an enhanced support group (ESG). The four key outcomes were depression, anxiety, social support, and coping. Low baseline self-efficacy scores were hypothesized to be more predictive of positive response in the psychoeducational intervention than in the support group. Change from pre- to posttreatment (baseline to three months) for 213 female caregivers of older adult relatives with dementia (122 Anglos and 91 Latinos) are presented. Caregivers were randomly assigned to either the coping with caregiving class (CWC), a skill-building, small group intervention designed to reduce caregiving stress, or to an enhanced support group (ESG), which used guided discussion and empathic listening to develop within-group reciprocal support. The findings showed that low baseline self-efficacy scores better predicted positive response to treatment in the CWC intervention than in the ESG intervention. This study supports the use of self-efficacy as a screening tool for appropriate caregiver intervention assignment.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000239205500002

    View details for PubMedID 16861368

  • Synthesis and evaluation of succinoyl-caprolactam gamma-secretase inhibitors BIOORGANIC & MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY LETTERS Thompson, L. A., Liauw, A. Y., Ramanjulu, M. M., Kasireddy-Polam, P., Mercer, S. E., Maduskuie, T. P., Glicksman, M., Roach, A. H., Meredith, J. E., Liu, R. Q., Combs, A. P., Higaki, J. N., Cordell, B., Seiffert, D., Zaczek, R. C., Robertson, D. W., Olson, R. E. 2006; 16 (9): 2357-2363

    Abstract

    The synthesis, evaluation, and structure-activity relationships of a series of succinoyl lactam inhibitors of the Alzheimer's disease gamma-secretase are described. Beginning with a screening hit with broad proteinase activity, optimization provided compounds with both high selectivity for inhibition of gamma-secretase and high potency in cellular assays of A beta reduction. The SAR and early in vivo properties of this series of inhibitors will be presented.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.bmcl.2006.01.055

    View details for Web of Science ID 000236564500008

    View details for PubMedID 16473009

  • Ethnicity, stress, and cortisol function in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women: A preliminary study of family dementia caregivers and noncaregivers AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY Gallagher-Thompson, D., Shurgot, G. R., Rider, K., Gray, H. L., McKibbin, C. L., Kraemer, H. C., Sephton, S. E., Thompson, L. W. 2006; 14 (4): 334-342

    Abstract

    This study examined differences in psychologic and physiological responses to caregiving stress in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women dementia caregivers and noncaregivers. Dependent variables were perceived stress, depression, and salivary cortisol.Eighty-three women caregivers (20 Hispanic and 24 non-Hispanic white) and noncaregivers (19 Hispanic and 20 non-Hispanic white) completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), and collected three saliva samples daily for 3 consecutive days. A subsample of 17 Hispanic and 28 non-Hispanic white participants matched on age and education was used for the main analyses.Caregivers had higher levels of 8 am, 5 pm, and 9 pm log cortisol as well as higher perceived stress than noncaregivers. Non-Hispanic whites had higher depression scores than noncaregivers, but there was no significant difference for Hispanics. Hispanics, regardless of caregiving status had flatter daytime cortisol slopes than the non-Hispanic whites. Multivariate regression analyses showed that both ethnicity and depressive symptoms independently predicted daytime cortisol slope.Results support the relationship between chronic stress and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation among women dementia caregivers and highlight the need to examine further the role of ethnicity and depressive symptoms in their physiological responses.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000236540800006

    View details for PubMedID 16582042

  • Impact of current grief on memory for past grief in spousal bereavement MEMORY Field, N. P., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2006; 14 (3): 297-306

    Abstract

    This study examined the impact of changes in level of current grief over time on changes in memory for past grief. Following from previous work on the impact of current affective state on memory for past affectively salient events, bereaved individuals who underwent a greater reduction in grief over time were expected to show a similar pattern of changes in memory for past grief. A sample of conjugally bereaved participants completed measures of current grief and memory for past grief at the time of the loss of their spouse at each of the 2, 6, 13, and 30 month post-loss time periods. As predicted, those who reported greater reduction in grief over the course of the study were more likely to remember their past grief as progressively less severe relative to those who underwent less reduction in grief over time. A nonrecursive causal model analysis verified that changes in memory for past grief were explained by changes in current grief. These results were discussed in terms of contemporary reconstructive memory accounts of the effect of affective state on memory.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/09658210500243747

    View details for Web of Science ID 000237386700004

    View details for PubMedID 16574586

  • Genome-wide screen for Salmonella genes required for long-term systemic infection of the mouse PLOS PATHOGENS Lawley, T. D., Chan, K., Thompson, L. J., Kim, C. C., Govoni, G. R., Monack, D. M. 2006; 2 (2): 87-100

    Abstract

    A microarray-based negative selection screen was performed to identify Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (serovar Typhimurium) genes that contribute to long-term systemic infection in 129X1/SvJ (Nramp1(r)) mice. A high-complexity transposon-mutagenized library was used to infect mice intraperitoneally, and the selective disappearance of mutants was monitored after 7, 14, 21, and 28 d postinfection. One hundred and eighteen genes were identified to contribute to serovar Typhimurium infection of the spleens of mice by 28 d postinfection. The negatively selected mutants represent many known aspects of Salmonella physiology and pathogenesis, although the majority of the identified genes are of putative or unknown function. Approximately 30% of the negatively selected genes correspond to horizontally acquired regions such as those within Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI 1-5), prophages (Gifsy-1 and -2 and remnant), and the pSLT virulence plasmid. In addition, mutations in genes responsible for outer membrane structure and remodeling, such as LPS- and PhoP-regulated and fimbrial genes, were also selected against. Competitive index experiments demonstrated that the secreted SPI2 effectors SseK2 and SseJ as well as the SPI4 locus are attenuated relative to wild-type bacteria during systemic infection. Interestingly, several SPI1-encoded type III secretion system effectors/translocases are required by serovar Typhimurium to establish and, unexpectedly, to persist systemically, challenging the present description of Salmonella pathogenesis. Moreover, we observed a progressive selection against serovar Typhimurium mutants based upon the duration of the infection, suggesting that different classes of genes may be required at distinct stages of infection. Overall, these data indicate that Salmonella long-term systemic infection in the mouse requires a diverse repertoire of virulence factors. This diversity of genes presumably reflects the fact that bacteria sequentially encounter a variety of host environments and that Salmonella has evolved to respond to these selective forces in a way that permits both the bacteria and the host to survive.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.ppat.0020011

    View details for Web of Science ID 000202894200004

    View details for PubMedID 16518469

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC1383486

  • Treatment of depression in low-income older adults PSYCHOLOGY AND AGING Arean, P. A., Gum, A., McCulloch, C. E., Bostrom, A., Gallagher-Thompson, D., Thompson, L. 2005; 20 (4): 601-609

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to compare cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT), clinical case management (CCM), and their combination (CBGT + CCM) to treat depression in low-income older adults (60+). Sixty-seven participants with major depressive disorder or dysthymia were randomly assigned and entered into 1 of the 3 treatment conditions for 6 months. They were followed for 18 months after treatment initiation on depression and functional outcomes. CCM and CBGT + CCM led to greater improvements in depressive symptoms than CBGT, but CBGT led to greater improvements in physical functioning. All 3 conditions resulted in similar reduction of needs. Findings suggest that disadvantaged older adults with depression benefit from increased access to social services either alone or combined with psychotherapy.

    View details for DOI 10.1037/0882-7974.20.4.601

    View details for Web of Science ID 000234623100007

    View details for PubMedID 16420135

  • Caregiver self-efficacy, ethnicity, and kinship differences in dementia caregivers AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY Depp, C., Sorocco, K., Kasl-Godley, J., Thompson, L., Rabinowitz, Y., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2005; 13 (9): 787-794

    Abstract

    The authors sought to determine the effect of kinship status (daughters versus wives) and ethnicity (Hispanic/Latino versus Caucasian) on self-efficacy to perform tasks relevant to caregiving in a sample of family caregivers for people with memory problems.Baseline data were collected from 238 female caregivers who participated in an intervention program. Ethnic and kin relationship groups were compared on measures of caregiver self-efficacy, acculturation within the Hispanic/Latino sample, and the relationship of self-efficacy to key outcome variables.Hispanics/Latinos reported higher self-efficacy on two of three self-efficacy subscales (Responding to Disruptive Behaviors and Controlling Negative Thoughts About Caregiving). Daughters reported higher self-efficacy on all three self-efficacy scales. Among Hispanics/Latinos, acculturation did not relate strongly to self-efficacy. Caucasian and spousal caregivers appeared to make more generalized appraisals about caregiving.Higher self-efficacy among Hispanic/Latino caregivers may relate to cultural values about caregiving and/or ethnic differences in appraisal. Wives may be more at risk for low self-efficacy, which may relate to greater role frustration and distress. This study highlights the heterogeneity among caregivers in their experience of caregiving.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000231755800007

    View details for PubMedID 16166408

  • Sequential immune escape and shifting of T cell responses in a long-term survivor of melanoma JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY Yamshchikov, G. V., Mullins, D. W., Chang, C. C., Ogino, T., Thompson, L., Presley, J., Galavotti, H., Aquila, W., DEACON, D., Ross, W., Patterson, J. W., Engelhard, V. H., Ferrone, S., Slingluff, C. L. 2005; 174 (11): 6863-6871

    Abstract

    Immune-mediated control of tumors may occur, in part, through lysis of malignant cells by CD8(+) T cells that recognize specific Ag-HLA class I complexes. However, tumor cell populations may escape T cell responses by immune editing, by preventing formation of those Ag-HLA complexes. It remains unclear whether the human immune system can respond to immune editing and recognize newly arising escape variants. We report an example of shifting immune responses to escape variants in a patient with sequential metastases of melanoma and long-term survival after surgery alone. Tumor cells in the first metastasis escaped immune recognition via selective loss of an HLA haplotype (HLA-A11, -B44, and -Cw17), but maintained expression of HLA-A2. In the second metastasis, immune escape from an immunodominant MART-1-specific T cell response was mediated by HLA class I down-regulation, resulting in a failure to present this epitope, but persistent presentation of a tyrosinase-derived epitope. Consequent to this modification in tumor Ag presentation, the dominant CTL response shifted principally toward a tyrosinase-targeted response, even though tyrosinase-specific CTL had been undetectable during the initial metastatic event. Thus, in response to immune editing of tumor cells, a patient's spontaneous T cell response adapted, gaining the ability to recognize and to lyse "edited" tumor targets. The observation of both immune editing and immune adaptation in a patient with long-term survival after surgery alone demonstrates an example of immune system reactivity to counteract the escape mechanism(s) developed by tumor cells, which may contribute to the clinical outcome of malignant disease.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000229298400042

    View details for PubMedID 15905528

  • A potent small molecule inhibits polyglutamine aggregation in Huntington's disease neurons and suppresses neurodegeneration in vivo PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Zhang, X. Q., Smith, D. L., Merlin, A. B., Engemann, S., Russel, D. E., Roark, M., Washington, S. L., Maxwell, M. M., Marsh, J. L., Thompson, L. M., Wanker, E. E., Young, A. B., Housman, D. E., Bates, G. P., Sherman, M. Y., Kazantsev, A. G. 2005; 102 (3): 892-897

    Abstract

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) disorders, including Huntington's disease (HD), are caused by expansion of polyQ-encoding repeats within otherwise unrelated gene products. In polyQ diseases, the pathology and death of affected neurons are associated with the accumulation of mutant proteins in insoluble aggregates. Several studies implicate polyQ-dependent aggregation as a cause of neurodegeneration in HD, suggesting that inhibition of neuronal polyQ aggregation may be therapeutic in HD patients. We have used a yeast-based high-throughput screening assay to identify small-molecule inhibitors of polyQ aggregation. We validated the effects of four hit compounds in mammalian cell-based models of HD, optimized compound structures for potency, and then tested them in vitro in cultured brain slices from HD transgenic mice. These efforts identified a potent compound (IC50=10 nM) with long-term inhibitory effects on polyQ aggregation in HD neurons. Testing of this compound in a Drosophila HD model showed that it suppresses neurodegeneration in vivo, strongly suggesting an essential role for polyQ aggregation in HD pathology. The aggregation inhibitors identified in this screen represent four primary chemical scaffolds and are strong lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for human polyQ diseases.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0408936102

    View details for Web of Science ID 000226436000066

    View details for PubMedID 15642944

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC545525

  • Constraints on anomalous QGCs in e(+)e(-) interactions from 183 to 209 GeV PHYSICS LETTERS B Heister, A., Schael, S., Barate, R., Bruneliere, R., De Bonis, I., Decamp, D., Goy, C., Jezequel, S., Lees, J. P., Martin, F., Merle, E., Minard, M. N., Pietrzyk, B., Trocme, B., Bravo, S., Casado, M. P., Chmeissani, M., Crespo, J. M., Fernandez, E., Fernandez-Bosman, M., Garrido, L., Martinez, M., Pacheco, A., Ruiz, H., Colaleo, A., Creanza, D., De Filippis, N., de Palma, M., Iaselli, G., Maggi, G., Maggi, M., Nuzzo, S., Ranieri, A., Raso, G., Ruggieri, F., Selvaggi, G., Silvestris, L., Tempesta, P., Tricomi, A., Zito, G., Huang, X., Lin, J., Ouyang, Q., Wang, T., Xie, Y., Xu, R., Xue, S., Zhang, J., Zhang, L., Zhao, W., Abbaneo, D., Barklow, T., Buchmuller, O., Cattaneo, M., Clerbaux, B., Drevermann, H., Forty, R. W., Frank, M., Gianotti, F., Hansen, J. B., Harvey, J., Hutchcroft, D. E., Janot, P., JOST, B., Kado, M., Mato, P., Moutoussi, A., Ranjard, F., Rolandi, L., Schlatter, D., Sguazzoni, G., Teubert, F., Valassi, A., Videau, I., Badaud, E., Dessagne, S., Falvard, A., Fayolle, D., Gay, P., Jousset, J., Michel, B., Monteil, S., Pallin, D., Pascolo, J. M., Perret, P., Hansen, J. D., Hansen, J. R., Hansen, P. H., Kraan, A. C., Nilsson, B. S., Kyriakis, A., Markou, C., Simopoulou, E., Vayaki, A., Zachariadou, K., Blondel, A., Brient, J. C., Machefert, F., Rouge, A., Videau, H., Ciulli, V., Focardi, E., Parrini, G., Antonelli, A., Antonelli, M., Bencivenni, G., Bossi, F., Capon, G., Cerutti, F., Chiarella, V., Laurelli, P., Mannocchi, G., Murtas, G. P., Passalacqua, L., Kennedy, J., Lynch, J. G., Negus, P., O'Shea, V., Thompson, A. S., Wasserbaech, S., Cavanaugh, R., Dhamotharan, S., Geweniger, C., Hanke, P., Hepp, V., Kluge, E. E., Putzer, A., Stenzel, H., Tittel, K., Wunsch, M., Beuselinck, R., Cameron, W., Davies, G., Dornan, P. J., Girone, M., Hill, R. D., Marinelli, N., Nowell, J., Rutherford, S. A., Sedgbeer, J. K., THOMPSON, J. C., White, R., Ghete, V. M., Girtler, P., Kneringer, E., Kuhn, D., Rudolph, G., Bouhova-Thacker, E., Bowdery, C. K., Clarke, D. P., Ellis, G., Finch, A. J., Foster, F., Hughes, G., Jones, R. W., Pearson, M. R., Robertson, N. A., Smizanska, M., van der Aa, O., Delaere, C., Leibenguth, G., Lemaitre, V., Blumenschein, U., Holldorfer, F., Jakobs, K., Kayser, F., Kleinknecht, K., Muller, A. S., Renk, B., Sander, H. G., Schmeling, S., Wachsmuth, H., Zeitnitz, C., Ziegler, T., Bonissent, A., Coyle, P., Curtil, C., Ealet, A., Fouchez, D., Payre, P., Tilquin, A., Ragusa, F., David, A., Dietl, H., Ganis, G., Huttmann, K., Lutjens, G., Manner, W., Moser, H. G., Settles, R., Villegas, M., Wolf, G., Boucrot, J., Callot, O., Davier, M., Duflot, L., Grivaz, J. F., Heusse, P., Jacholkowska, A., Serin, L., Veillet, J. J., Azzurri, P., Bagliesi, G., Boccali, T., Foa, L., Giammanco, A., Giassi, A., Ligabue, F., Messineo, A., Palla, F., Sanguinetti, G., Sciaba, A., Spagnolo, P., Tenchini, R., Venturi, A., Verdini, P. G., Awunor, O., Blair, G. A., Cowan, G., Garcia-Bellido, A., Green, M. G., Medcalf, T., Misiejuk, A., Strong, J. A., Teixeira-Dias, P., Clifft, R. W., Edgecock, T. R., Norton, P. R., Tomalin, I. R., Ward, J. J., Bloch-Devaux, B., Boumediene, D., Colas, P., Fabbro, B., Lancon, E., Lemaire, M. C., Locci, E., Perez, P., Rander, J., Tuchming, B., Vallage, B., Litke, A. M., Taylor, G., Booth, C. N., Cartwright, S., Combley, F., Hodgson, P. N., LEHTO, M., Thompson, L. F., Bohrer, A., Brandt, S., Grupen, C., Hess, J., Ngac, A., Prange, G., Borean, C., Giannini, G., He, H., Putz, J., Rothberg, J., Armstrong, S. R., Berkelman, K., Cranmer, K., Ferguson, D. P., Gao, Y., Gonzalez, S., Hayes, O. J., Hu, H., Jin, S., Kile, J., McNamara, P. A., Nielsen, J., Pan, Y., von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H., Wiedenmann, W., Wu, J., Wu, S. L., Wu, X., Zobernig, G., Dissertori, G. 2004; 602 (1-2): 31-40
  • Well-being, appraisal, and coping in Latina and Caucasian female dementia caregivers: findings from the REACH study AGING & MENTAL HEALTH Coon, D. W., Rubert, M., Solano, N., Mausbach, B., Kraemer, H., Arguelles, T., Haley, W. E., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2004; 8 (4): 330-345

    Abstract

    While there has been considerable interest in studying ethnically diverse family caregivers, few studies have investigated the influence of dementia caregiving on Latino families. The current study includes participants from two sites of the REACH (Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregiver Health) project to compare well-being, appraisal, and religiosity by ethnicity, with specific attention to levels of acculturation. Latina (n = 191) and Caucasian female (n = 229) dementia family caregivers from two regions of the United States (Miami, Florida and Northern California) were compared at baseline on demographics, care recipient characteristics, mental and physical health, and psychosocial resources, including appraisal style and religiosity. Latina caregivers reported lower appraisals of stress, greater perceived benefits of caregiving, and greater use of religious coping than Caucasian caregivers. The relationship of these variables to level of acculturation for the Latina caregivers was also explored. Implications of these results for psychosocial interventions with Latino and Caucasian family caregivers are discussed.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/13607860410001709683

    View details for Web of Science ID 000222784200005

    View details for PubMedID 15370049

  • Ethnicity and time to institutionalization of dementia patients: A comparison of Latina and Caucasian female family caregivers JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY Mausbach, B. T., Coon, D. W., Depp, C., Rabinowitz, Y. G., Wilson-Arias, E., Kraemer, H. C., Thompson, L. W., Lane, G., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2004; 52 (7): 1077-1084

    Abstract

    To compare rates of institutionalization of dementia patients cared for by Latina and Caucasian female caregivers and to explore which caregiver and care-recipient characteristics predicted institutionalization.Longitudinal.San Francisco Bay area, California.Two hundred sixty-four female caregivers of dementia patients (154 Caucasian women, 110 Latinas) who participated in an intervention project designed to reduce caregiver stress and may represent a sample that is more stressed and motivated than a general sample of caregivers.Number of days between baseline interview and institutionalization was recorded over an 18-month period. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with the log rank statistic was used to test for ethnic differences in time to institutionalization. Cox regression analyses were conducted to determine whether care-recipient or caregiver characteristics (e.g., care-recipient age and memory and behavior problems; caregiver depression, years of education, income, and views of the caregiving role) significantly interacted with ethnicity to explain time to institutionalization.Latinas delayed institutionalization significantly longer than their Caucasian counterparts; care-recipient characteristics or caregiver demographics did not explain these results, although Latinas who identified greater benefits or more-positive aspects of the caregiving process at baseline were less likely to institutionalize their loved one than those who reported fewer benefits of caregiving. Less-acculturated Latinas were significantly more likely to identify positive aspects of caregiving than more-acculturated Latinas.Latina dementia caregivers delay institutionalization significantly longer than female Caucasian caregivers. In addition, Latino cultural values and positive views of the caregiving role are important factors that may significantly influence their decision to institutionalize loved ones with dementia.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000222070900005

    View details for PubMedID 15209644

  • A pilot study of a yoga and meditation intervention for dementia caregiver stress 109th Annual Convention of the American-Psychological-Association Waelde, L. C., Thompson, L., Gallagher-Thompson, D. JOHN WILEY & SONS INC. 2004: 677–87

    Abstract

    Twelve older female dementia patient family caregivers (eight Latinas and four Caucasians) participated in a six-session manualized yoga-meditation program (called Inner Resources) designed to help caregivers cope with stress. Pre/post comparisons revealed statistically significant reductions in depression and anxiety and improvements in perceived self-efficacy. Average minutes of weekly yoga-meditation practice were significantly associated with improvements in depression. The majority of caregivers found the intervention useful and reported subjective improvements in physical and emotional functioning. These findings suggest that Inner Resources may be a feasible and effective intervention for family caregivers and may improve affect, coping, physical well-being, and stress management.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/jclp.10259

    View details for Web of Science ID 000221622900009

    View details for PubMedID 15141399

  • End-of-life care and the effects of bereavement on family caregivers of persons with dementia NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Schulz, R., Mendelsohn, A. B., Haley, W. E., Mahoney, D., Allen, R. S., Zhang, S., Thompson, L., Belle, S. H. 2003; 349 (20): 1936-1942

    Abstract

    Although family caregiving has been intensively studied in the past decade, little attention has been paid to the impact of end-of-life care on caregivers who are family members of persons with dementia or to the caregivers' responses to the death of the patient.Using standardized assessment instruments and structured questions, we assessed the type and intensity of care provided by 217 family caregivers to persons with dementia during the year before the patient's death and assessed the caregivers' responses to the death.Half the caregivers reported spending at least 46 hours per week assisting patients with activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living. More than half the caregivers reported that they felt they were "on duty" 24 hours a day, that the patient had frequent pain, and that they had had to end or reduce employment owing to the demands of caregiving. Caregivers exhibited high levels of depressive symptoms while providing care to the relative with dementia, but they showed remarkable resilience after the death. Within three months of the death, caregivers had clinically significant declines in the level of depressive symptoms, and within one year the levels of symptoms were substantially lower than levels reported while they were acting as caregivers. Seventy-two percent of caregivers reported that the death was a relief to them, and more than 90 percent reported belief that it was a relief to the patient.End-of-life care for patients with dementia was extremely demanding of family caregivers. Intervention and support services were needed most before the patient's death. When death was preceded by a protracted and stressful period of caregiving, caregivers reported considerable relief at the death itself.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000186502400010

    View details for PubMedID 14614169

  • Anger and depression management: Psychoeducational skill training interventions for women caregivers of a relative with dementia GERONTOLOGIST Coon, D. W., Thompson, L., Steffen, A., Sorocco, K., Gallagher-Thompson, D. 2003; 43 (5): 678-689

    Abstract

    This study examines the short-term impact of two theoretically based psychoeducational small group interventions with distressed caregivers, and it also examines the role of specific moderator and mediator variables on caregiver outcomes.Female participants (N = 169) aged 50 and older who were caring for a community-dwelling relative with a dementing illness were randomly assigned to one of three treatment interventions: anger management, depression management, or a wait-list control group. These interventions took place over a 3- to 4-month period. The primary outcomes examined were anger or hostile mood, depressed mood, frequency of use of positive and negative coping strategies, and perceived caregiving self-efficacy.Significant main effects in the expected direction were found for changes in most of these measures. Participants in both anger management and depression management groups had significant reductions in their levels of anger or hostility and depression from Time 1 to Time 2 in comparison to participants in the wait-list control group. Use of positive cognitive coping strategies increased in the anger management group only. Self-efficacy significantly increased for participants in both intervention groups, and it was also demonstrated to function as a mediator of intervention effects. Pretreatment levels of depressive symptoms and anger expression style (Anger Expression-Out) moderated the relative effects of the two interventions on mood and coping.These data are consistent with a growing body of evidence supporting the effectiveness of skills training, in small groups, to improve both the affective states and the type of coping strategies used by caregivers. In addition, this study underscores the need to evaluate key pretreatment variables in order to determine which form of treatment may be more compatible with caregiver characteristics and thus more likely to be beneficial to individuals.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000186088100008

    View details for PubMedID 14570964

  • Patterns in formal service use among Latina and Caucasian female dementia family caregivers prior to treatment: REACH California site findings Gray, H., Coon, D., Mausbach, B., Rabinowitz, R., Dupart, T., Wilson, E., Cardenas, V., Long, C., Egwaikhide, A., Thompson, L., Gallagher-Thompson, D. OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. 2003: 169–169
  • Search for supersymmetric particles with R-parity violating decays in e(+)e(-) collisions at root s up to 209 GeV EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL C Heister, A., Schael, S., Barate, R., Bruneliere, R., De Bonis, I., Decamp, D., Goy, C., Jezequel, S., Lees, J. P., Martin, F., Merle, E., Minard, M. N., Pietrzyk, B., Trocme, B., Bravo, S., Casado, M. P., Chmeissani, M., Crespo, J. M., Fernandez, E., Fernandez-Bosman, M., Garrido, L., Martinez, M., Pacheco, A., Ruiz, H., Colaleo, A., Creanza, D., De Filippis, N., de Palma, M., Iaselli, G., Maggi, G., Maggi, M., Nuzzo, S., Ranieri, A., Raso, G., Ruggieri, F., Selvaggi, G., Silvestris, L., Tempesta, P., Tricomi, A., Zito, G., Huang, X., Lin, J., Ouyang, Q., Wang, T., Xie, Y., Xu, R., Xue, S., Zhang, J., Zhang, L., Zhao, W., Abbaneo, D., Azzurri, P., Barklow, T., Buchmuller, O., Cattaneo, M., Cerutti, F., Clerbaux, B., Drevermann, H., Forty, R. W., Frank, M., Gianotti, F., Hansen, J. B., Harvey, J., Hutchcroft, D. E., Janot, P., JOST, B., Kado, M., Mato, P., Moutoussi, A., Ranjard, F., Rolandi, L., Schlatter, D., Sguazzoni, G., Tejessy, W., Teubert, F., Valassi, A., Videau, I., Ward, J. J., Badaud, F., Dessagne, S., Falvard, A., Fayolle, D., Gay, P., Jousset, J., Michel, B., Monteil, S., Pallin, D., Pascolo, J. M., Perret, P., Hansen, J. D., Hansen, J. R., Hansen, P. H., Nilsson, B. S., Kyriakis, A., Markou, C., Simopoulou, E., Vayaki, A., Zachariadou, K., Blondel, A., Brient, J. C., Machefert, F., Rouge, A., Swynghedauw, M., Tanaka, R., Ciulli, V., Focardi, E., Parrini, G., Antonelli, A., Antonelli, M., Bencivenni, G., Bossi, F., Capon, G., Cerutti, F., Chiarella, V., Laurelli, P., Mannocchi, G., Murtas, G. P., Passalacqua, L., Kennedy, J., Lynch, J. G., Negus, P., O'Shea, V., Thompson, A. S., Wasserbaech, S., Cavanaugh, R., Dhamotharan, S., Geweniger, C., Hanke, P., Hepp, V., Kluge, E. E., Leibenguth, G., Putzer, A., Stenzel, H., Tittel, K., Wunsch, M., Beuselinck, R., Cameron, W., Davies, G., Dornan, P. J., Girone, M., Hill, R. D., Marinelli, N., Nowell, J., Rutherford, S. A., Sedgbeer, J. K., THOMPSON, J. C., White, R., Ghete, V. M., Girtler, P., Kneringer, E., Kuhn, D., Rudolph, G., Bouhova-Thacker, E., Bowdery, C. K., Clarke, D. P., Ellis, G., Finch, A. J., Foster, F., Hughes, G., Jones, R. W., Pearson, M. R., Robertson, N. A., Smizanska, M., van der Aa, O., Delaere, C., Lemaitre, V., Blumenschein, U., Holldorfer, F., Jakobs, K., Kayser, F., Kleinknecht, K., Muller, A. S., Renk, B., Sander, H. G., Schmeling, S., Wachsmuth, H., Zeitnitz, C., Ziegler, T., Bonissent, A., Coyle, P., Curtil, C., Ealet, A., Fouchez, D., Payre, P., Tilquin, A., Ragusa, F., David, A., Dietl, H., Ganis, G., Huttmann, K., Lutjens, G., Manner, W., Moser, H. G., Settles, R., Wolf, G., Boucrot, J., Callot, O., Davier, M., Duflot, L., Grivaz, J. F., Heusse, P., Jacholkowska, A., Serin, L., Veillet, J. J., Yuan, C., Bagliesi, G., Boccali, T., Foa, L., Giammanco, A., Giassi, A., Ligabue, F., Messineo, A., Palla, F., Sanguinetti, G., Sciaba, A., Spagnolo, P., Tenchini, R., Venturi, A., Verdini, P. G., Awunor, O., Blair, G. A., Cowan, G., Garcia-Bellido, A., Green, M. G., Jones, L. T., Medcalf, T., Misiejuk, A., Strong, J. A., Teixeira-Dias, P., Clifft, R. W., Edgecock, T. R., Norton, P. R., Tomalin, I. R., Bloch-Devaux, B., Boumediene, D., Colas, P., Fabbro, B., Lancon, E., Lemaire, M. C., Locci, E., Perez, P., Rander, J., Tuchming, B., Vallage, B., Konstantinidis, N., Litke, A. M., Taylor, G., Booth, C. N., Cartwright, S., Combley, F., Hodgson, P. N., LEHTO, M., Thompson, L. F., Bohrer, A., Brandt, S., Grupen, C., Hess, J., Ngac, A., Prange, G., Borean, C., Giannini, G., He, H., Putz, J., Rothberg, J., Armstrong, S. R., Berkelman, K., Cranmer, K., Ferguson, D. P., Gao, Y., Gonzalez, S., Hayes, O. J., Hu, H., Jin, S., Kile, J., McNamara, P. A., Nielsen, J., Pan, Y. B., von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H., Wiedenmann, W., Wu, J., Wu, S. L., Wu, X., Zobernig, G., Dissertori, G. 2003; 31 (1): 1-16
  • Exclusive production of pion and kaon meson pairs in two photon collisions at LEP PHYSICS LETTERS B Heister, A., Schael, S., Barate, R., Bruneliere, R., De Bonis, I., Decamp, D., Goy, C., Jezequel, S., Lees, J. P., Martin, F., Merle, E., Minard, M. N., Pietrzyk, B., Trocme, B., Bravo, S., Casado, M. P., Chmeissani, M., Crespo, J. M., Fernandez, E., Fernandez-Bosman, M., Garrido, L., Martinez, M., Pacheco, A., Ruiz, H., Colaleo, A., Creanza, D., De Filippis, N., de Palma, M., Iaselli, G., Maggi, G., Maggi, M., Nuzzo, S., Ranieri, A., Raso, G., Ruggieri, F., Selvaggi, G., Silvestris, L., Tempesta, P., Tricomi, A., Zito, G., Huang, X., Lin, J., Ouyang, Q., Wang, T., Xie, Y., Xu, R., Xue, S., Zhang, J., Zhang, L., Zhao, W., Abbaneo, D., Barklow, T., Buchmuller, O., Cattaneo, M., Clerbaux, B., Drevermann, H., Forty, R. W., Frank, M., Gianotti, E., Hansen, J. B., Harvey, J., Hutchcroft, D. E., Janot, P., JOST, B., Kado, M., Mato, P., Moutoussi, A., Ranjard, F., Rolandi, L., Schlatter, D., Sguazzoni, G., Teubert, F., Valassi, A., Videau, I., Badaud, F., Dessagne, S., Falvard, A., Fayolle, D., Gay, P., Jousset, J., Michel, B., Monteil, S., Pallin, D., Pascolo, J. M., Perret, P., Hansen, J. D., Hansen, J. R., Hansen, P. H., Kraan, A. C., Nilsson, B. S., Kyriakis, A., Markou, C., Simopoulou, E., Vayaki, A., Zachariadou, K., Blondel, A., Brient, J. C., Machefert, F., Rouge, A., Videau, H., Ciulli, V., Focardi, E., Parrini, G., Antonelli, A., Antonelli, M., Bencivenni, G., Bossi, E., Capon, G., Cerutti, E., Chiarella, V., Laurelli, P., Mannocchi, G., Murtas, G. P., Passalacqua, L., Kennedy, J., Lynch, J. G., Negus, P., O'Shea, V., Thompson, A. S., Wasserbaech, S., Cavanaugh, R., Dhamotharan, S., Geweniger, C., Hanke, P., Hepp, V., Kluge, E. E., Putzer, A., Stenzel, H., Tittel, K., Wunsch, M., Beuselinck, R., Cameron, W., Davies, G., Dornan, P. J., Girone, M., Hill, R. D., Marinelli, N., Nowell, J., Rutherford, S. A., Sedgbeer, J. K., THOMPSON, J. C., White, R., Ghete, V. M., Girtler, P., Kneringer, E., Kuhn, D., Rudolph, G., Bouhova-Thacker, E., Bowdery, C. K., Clarke, D. P., Ellis, G., Finch, A. J., Foster, F., Hughes, G., Jones, R. W., Pearson, M. R., Robertson, N. A., Smizanska, M., van der Aa, O., Delaere, C., Leibenguth, G., Lemaitre, V., Blumenschein, U., Holldorfer, F., Jakobs, K., Kayser, F., Kleinknecht, K., Muller, A. S., Renk, B., Sander, H. G., Schmeling, S., Wachsmuth, H., Zeitnitz, C., Ziegler, T., Bonissent, A., Coyle, P., Curtil, C., Ealet, A., Fouchez, D., Payre, P., Tilquin, A., Ragusa, E., David, A., Dietl, H., Ganis, G., Huttmann, K., Lutjens, G., Manner, W., Moser, H. G., Settles, R., Villegas, M., Wolf, G., Boucrot, J., Callot, O., Davier, M., Duflot, L., Grivaz, J. F., Heusse, P., Jacholkowska, A., Serin, L., Veillet, J. J., Azzurri, P., Bagliesi, G., Boccali, T., Foa, L., Giammanco, A., Giassi, A., Ligabue, F., Messineo, A., Palla, F., Sanguinetti, G., Sciaba, A., Spagnolo, P., Tenchini, R., Venturi, A., Verdini, P. G., Awunor, O., Blair, G. A., Cowan, G., Garcia-Bellido, A., Green, M. G., Jones, L. T., Medcalf, T., Misiejuk, A., Strong, J. A., Teixeira-Dias, P., Clifft, R. W., Edgecock, T. R., Norton, P. R., Tornalin, I. R., Ward, J. J., Bloch-Devaux, B., Boumediene, D., Colas, P., Fabbro, B., Lancon, E., Lemaire, M. C., Locci, E., Perez, P., Rander, J., Tuchming, B., Vallage, B., Litke, A. M., Taylor, G., Booth, C. N., Cartwright, S., Combley, E., Hodgson, P. N., LEHTO, M., Thompson, L. F., Bohrer, A., Brandt, S., Grupen, C., Hess, J., Ngac, A., Prange, G., Borean, C., Giannini, G., He, H., Putz, J., Rothberg, J., Armstrong, S. R., Berkelman, K., Cranmer, K., Ferguson, D. P., Gao, Y., Gonzalez, S., Hayes, O. J., Hu, H., Jin, S., Kile, J., McNamara, P. A., Nielsen, J., Pan, Y. B., von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H., Wiedenmann, W., Wu, J., Wu, S. L., Wu, X., Zobernig, G., Dissertori, G. 2003; 569 (3-4): 140-150
  • Change in indices of distress among Latino and Anglo female caregivers of elderly relatives with dementia: Site-specific results from the REACH national collaborative study GERONTOLOGIST Gallagher-Thompson, D., Coon, D. W., Solano, N., Ambler, C., Rabinowitz, Y., Thompson, L. W. 2003; 43 (4): 580-591

    Abstract

    Few empirical studies have compared the efficacy between psychoeducational (skill-building) approaches for reducing caregivers' psychological distress and interventions modeled after typical community-based support groups. We compare the impact of two distinct interventions on Anglo and Latino caregivers of elderly relatives with dementia.The change from preassessment to postassessment (baseline to 3 months) for 213 female caregivers (122 Anglo and 91 Latino) is presented. They were seen weekly for 10 weeks in either the Coping With Caregiving psychoeducational program (instruction and practice in small groups to learn specific cognitive and behavioral skills) or in the Enhanced Support Group condition (guided discussion and empathic listening to develop reciprocal support within the group). Both programs were tailored to be sensitive to the cultural concerns of Anglo and Latino caregivers, and they were delivered in either English or Spanish by trained interventionists.Overall, participants in the Coping With Caregiving condition reported a significant reduction in depressive symptoms, increased use of adaptive coping strategies, and a trend toward decreased use of negative coping strategies when compared with those in the Enhanced Support Group condition. Results were similar for both ethnic groups: there were no main effects for ethnicity, and no significant ethnicity by treatment interaction effects.This study provides empirical support that female caregivers benefit more from a skill-building approach to managing their distress than from support group membership alone. We find it very encouraging that the Latino caregivers responded well on key outcome variables, suggesting that Latinos will participate in clinical research and will benefit from their involvement when services are provided to meet their specific needs.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000184967700014

    View details for PubMedID 12937336

  • A comparison of the dodo, EST, and ATI factors among comorbid stimulant dependent, depressed patients CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY & PSYCHOTHERAPY BEUTLER, L. E., Moleiro, C., Malik, M., Harwood, T. M., Romanelli, R., Gallagher-Thompson, D., Thompson, L. 2003; 10 (2): 69-85

    View details for DOI 10.1002/cpp.354

    View details for Web of Science ID 000182380700001

  • Are all cognitive therapies alike? A comparison of cognitive and noncognitive therapy process and implications for the application of empirically supported treatments JOURNAL OF CONSULTING AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Malik, M. L., BEUTLER, L. E., Alimohamed, S., Gallagher-Thompson, D., Thompson, L. 2003; 71 (1): 150-158

    Abstract

    The definition of an empirically supported treatment (EST) arguably embodies 2 untested assumptions: (a) that different manualized renditions of the same therapy are functionally equivalent and (b) that therapies can be reliably applied independently of therapist, setting, and format. These assumptions were tested as applied to cognitive therapy (CT), using process data from a large multisite study (N = 235) that included 3 cognitive and 6 alternative therapies. Although the non-CTs were more variable than the CTs on 2 of 4 dimensions studied (directiveness and emotional arousal), there was considerable variation among the 3 CTs, even when implemented in the current context of rigorous training, manualization, and adherence checks. Results are discussed as related to the assumptions underlying EST criteria.

    View details for DOI 10.1037//0022-006X.71.1.150

    View details for Web of Science ID 000180591700017

    View details for PubMedID 12602435

  • The relationship between homework compliance and treatment outcomes among older adult outpatients with mild-to-moderate depression AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY Coon, D. W., Thompson, L. W. 2003; 11 (1): 53-61

    Abstract

    The authors extend previous research on homework in psychotherapy by examining the relationship between homework compliance and therapeutic outcome among depressed older adult outpatients (N = 63), addressing previous limitations by using session-by-session therapist ratings of homework compliance and including both interviewer ratings and patient self-reports of outcomes.Patients were participants in a randomized clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of desipramine versus cognitive/behavioral therapy-alone (C/B-Alone) versus a combination of the two (Combined). Given the current study's focus on homework compliance, only patients assigned to conditions with assigned homework in the clinical trial (i.e., C/B-Alone and Combined conditions) were included.Results of hierarchical regression analyses indicated that homework compliance contributed significantly to posttreatment outcome as measured by both interviewer-administered and patient self-report measures of depression. A separate series of ANOVAs also found significant differences in pre-posttreatment change between patients scoring above and below the median of reported homework compliance. Findings were similar for patients in the C/B-Alone and Combined conditions.The study's results call for additional research on issues related to homework compliance with older adult patients.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000180366400008

    View details for PubMedID 12527540

  • Search for charged Higgs bosons in a(+)e(-) collisions at energies up to root s=209 GeV PHYSICS LETTERS B Heister, A., Schael, S., Barate, R., Bruneliere, R., De Bonis, I., Decamp, D., Goy, C., Jezequel, S., Lees, J. P., Martin, F., Merle, E., Minard, M. N., Pietrzyk, B., Boix, G., Bravo, S., Casado, M. P., Chmeissani, M., Crespo, J. M., Fernandez, E., Fernandez-Bosman, M., Garrido, L., Grauges, E., Lopez, J., Martinez, M., Merino, G., Pacheco, A., Paneque, D., Ruiz, H., Colaleo, A., Creanza, D., De Filippis, N., de Palma, M., Iaselli, G., Maggi, G., Maggi, M., Nuzzo, S., Ranieri, A., Raso, G., Ruggieri, F., Selvaggi, G., Silvestris, L., Tempesta, P., Tricomi, A., Zito, G., Huang, X., Lin, J., Ouyang, Q., Wang, T., Xie, I., Xu, R., Xue, S., Zhang, J., Zhang, L., Zhao, W., Abbaneo, D., Azzurri, P., Barklow, T., Buchmuller, O., Cattaneo, M., Cerutti, F., Clerbaux, B., Drevermann, H., Forty, R. W., Frank, M., Gianotti, F., Greening, T. C., Hansen, J. B., Harvey, J., Hutchcroft, D. E., Janot, P., JOST, B., Kado, M., Mato, P., Moutoussi, A., Ranjard, F., Rolandi, L., Schlatter, D., Sguazzoni, G., Tejessy, W., Teubert, F., Valassi, A., Videau, V., Ward, J. J., Badaud, F., Dessagne, S., Falvard, A., Fayolle, D., Gay, P., Jousset, J., Michel, B., Monteil, S., Pallin, D., Pascolo, J. M., Perret, P., Hansen, J. D., Hansen, J. R., Hansen, P. H., Nilsson, B. S., Kyriakis, A., Markou, C., Simopoulou, E., Vayaki, A., Zachariadou, K., Blondel, A., Brient, J. C., Machefert, F., Rouge, A., Swynghedauw, M., Tanaka, R., Videau, H., Ciulli, V., Focardi, E., Parrini, G., Antonelli, A., Antonelli, M., Bencivenni, G., Bossi, F., Capon, G., Chiarella, V., Laurelli, P., Mannocchi, G., Murtas, G. P., Passalacqua, L., Kennedy, J., Lynch, J. G., Negus, P., O'Shea, V., Thompson, A. S., Wasserbaech, S., Cavanaugh, R., Dhamotharan, S., Geweniger, C., Hanke, P., Hepp, V., Kluge, E. E., Leibenguth, G., Putzer, A., Stenzel, H., Tittel, K., Wunsch, M., Beuselinck, R., Cameron, W., Davies, G., Doman, P. J., Girone, M., Hill, R. D., Marinelli, N., Nowell, J., Rutherford, S. A., Sedgbeer, J. K., THOMPSON, J. C., White, R., Ghete, V. M., Girtler, P., Kneringer, E., Kuhn, D., Rudolph, G., Bouhova-Thacker, E., Bowdery, C. K., Clarke, D. P., Ellis, G., Finch, A. J., Foster, F., Hughes, G., Jones, R. W., Pearson, M. R., Robertson, N. A., Smizanska, M., van der Aa, O., Delaere, C., Lemaitre, V., Blumenschein, U., Holldorfer, F., Jakobs, K., Kayser, F., Kleinknecht, K., Moller, A. S., Quast, G., Renk, B., Sander, H. G., Schmeling, S., Wachsmuth, H., Zeitnitz, C., Ziegler, T., Bonissent, A., Coyle, P., Curtil, C., Ealet, A., Fouchez, D., Payre, P., Tilquin, A., Ragusa, F., David, A., Dietl, H., Ganis, G., Huttmann, K., Lutjens, G., Manner, W., Moser, H. G., Settles, R., Boucrot, J., Callot, O., Davier, M., Duflot, L., Grivaz, J. F., Heusse, P., Jacholkowska, A., Serin, L., Veillet, J. J., de Regie, J. B., Yuan, C., Bagliesi, G., Boccali, T., Foa, L., Giammanco, A., Giassi, A., Ligabue, F., Messineo, A., Palla, F., Sanguinetti, G., Sciaba, A., Tenchini, R., Venturi, A., Verdini, P. G., Awunor, O., Blair, G. A., Cowan, G., Garcia-Bellido, A., Green, M. G., Jones, L. T., Medcalf, T., Misiejuk, A., Strong, J. A., Teixeira-Dias, P., Clifft, R. W., Edgecock, T. R., Norton, P. R., Tomalin, I. R., Bloch-Devaux, B., Boumediene, D., Colas, P., Fabbro, B., Lancon, E., Lemaire, M. C., Locci, E., Perez, P., Rander, J., Seager, P., Tuchming, B., Vallage, B., Konstantinidis, N., Litke, A. M., Taylor, G., Booth, C. N., Cartwright, S., Combley, F., Hodgson, P. N., LEHTO, M., Thompson, L. F., Bohrer, A., Brandt, S., Grupen, C., Hess, J., Ngac, A., Prange, G., Sieler, U., Borean, C., Giannini, G., He, H., Putz, J., Rothberg, J., Armstrong, S. R., Berkelman, K., Cranmer, K., Ferguson, D. P., Gao, Y., Hayes, O. J., Hu, H., Jin, S., Kile, J., McNamnara, P. A., Nielsen, J., Pan, Y. B., von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H., Wiedenmann, W., Wu, J., Wu, S. L., Wu, X., Zobernig, G., Dissertori, G. 2002; 543 (1-2): 1-13
  • Measurement of triple gauge-boson couplings at LEP energies up to 189 GeV EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL C Heister, A., Schael, S., Barate, R., De Bonis, I., Decamp, D., Ghez, P., Goy, C., Jezequel, S., Lees, J. P., Martin, F., Merle, E., Minard, M. N., Pietrzyk, B., Trocme, B., Bravo, S., Casado, M. P., Chmeissani, M., Crespo, J. M., Fernandez, E., Fernandez-Bosman, M., Garrido, L., Grauges, E., Lopez, J., Martinez, M., Merino, G., Miquel, R., Mir, L. M., Pacheco, A., Paneque, D., Ruiz, H., Colaleo, A., Creanza, D., De Filippis, N., de Palma, M., Iaselli, G., Maggi, G., Maggi, M., Nuzzo, S., Ranieri, A., Raso, G., Ruggieri, F., Selvaggi, G., Silvestris, L., Tempesta, P., Tricomi, A., Zito, G., Huang, X., Lin, J., Ouyang, Q., Wang, T., Xie, Y., Xu, R., Xue, S., Zhang, J., Zhang, L., Zhao, W., Abbaneo, D., Azzurri, P., Barklow, T., Boix, G., Buchmuller, O., Cattaneo, M., Cerutti, F., Clerbaux, B., Dissertori, G., Drevermann, H., Forty, R. W., Frank, M., Gianotti, F., Greening, T. C., Hansen, J. B., Harvey, J., Hutchcroft, D. E., Janot, P., JOST, B., Kado, M., Lemaitre, V., Maley, P., Mato, P., Moutoussi, A., Ranjard, F., Rolandi, L., Schlatter, D., Spagnolo, P., Tejessy, W., Teubert, F., Tournefier, E., Valassi, A., Ward, J. J., Wright, A. E., Ajaltouni, Z., Badaud, F., Dessagne, S., Falvard, A., Fayolle, D., Gay, P., Henrard, P., Jousset, J., Michel, B., Monteil, S., Montret, J. C., Pallin, D., Pascolo, J. M., Perret, P., Podlyski, F., Hansen, J. D., Hansen, J. R., Hansen, P. H., Nilsson, B. S., Waananen, A., Daskalakis, G., Kyriakis, A., Markou, C., Simopoulou, E., Vayaki, A., Blondel, A., Brient, J. C., Machefert, F., Rouge, A., Swynghedauw, M., Tanaka, R., Videau, H., Focardi, E., Parrini, G., Zachariadou, K., Antonelli, A., Antonelli, M., Bencivenni, G., Bologna, G., Bossi, F., Campana, P., Capon, G., Chiarella, V., Laurelli, P., Mannocchi, G., Murtas, F., Murtas, G. P., Passalacqua, L., Pepe-Altarelli, M., Chalmers, M., Halley, A. W., Kennedy, J., Lynch, J. G., Negus, P., O'Shea, V., Raeven, B., Smith, D., Thompson, A. S., Wasserbaeck, S., Cavanaugh, R., Dhamotharan, S., Geweniger, C., Hanke, P., Hepp, V., Kluge, E. E., Leibenguth, G., Putzer, A., Tittel, K., Werner, S., Wunsch, M., Beuselinck, R., Binnie, D. M., Cameron, W., Davies, G., Dornan, P. J., Girone, M., Marinelli, N., Nowell, J., Przysiezniak, H., Rutherford, S., Sedgbeer, J. K., THOMPSON, J. C., White, R., Ghete, V. M., Girtler, P., Kneringer, E., Kuhn, D., Rudolph, G., Bouhova-Thacker, E., Bowdery, C. K., Clarke, D. P., Ellis, G., Finch, A. J., Foster, F., Hughes, G., Jones, R. W., Pearson, M. R., Robertson, N. A., Smizanska, M., Giehl, I., Holldorfer, F., Jakobs, K., Kleinknecht, K., Krocker, M., Muller, A. S., Nurnberger, H. A., Quast, G., Renk, B., Rohne, E., Sander, H. G., Schmeling, S., Wachsmuth, H., Zeitnitz, C., Ziegler, T., Bonissent, A., Carr, J., Coyle, P., Curtil, C., Ealet, A., Fouchez, D., Leroy, O., Kachelhoffer, T., Payre, P., Rousseau, D., Tilquin, A., Aleppo, M., Gilardoni, S., Ragusa, F., David, A., Dietl, H., Ganis, G., Huttmann, K., Lutjens, G., Mannert, C., Manner, W., Moser, H. G., Settles, R., Stenzel, H., Wolf, G., Boucrot, J., Callot, O., Davier, M., Duflot, L., Grivaz, J. F., Heusse, P., Jacholkowska, A., Serin, L., Veillet, J. J., Videau, I., de Regie, J. B., Yuan, C., Bagliesi, G., Boccali, T., Calderini, G., Ciulli, V., Foa, L., Giammanco, A., Giassi, A., Ligabue, F., Messineo, A., Palla, F., Sanguinetti, G., Sciaba, A., Sguazzoni, G., Tenchini, R., Venturi, A., Verdini, P. G., Awunor, O., Blair, G. A., Coles, J., Cowan, G., Garcia-Bellido, A., Green, M. G., Jones, L. T., Medcalf, T., Misiejuk, A., Strong, J. A., Teixeira-Dias, P., Clifft, R. W., Edgecock, T. R., Norton, P. R., Tomalin, I. R., Bloch-Devaux, B., Boumediene, D., Colas, P., Fabbro, B., Lancon, E., Lemaire, M. C., Locci, E., Perez, P., Rander, J., Renardy, J. F., Rosowsky, A., Seager, P., Trabelsi, A., Tuchming, B., Vallage, B., Konstantinidis, N., Litke, A. M., Loomis, C., Taylor, G., Booth, C. N., Cartwright, S., Combley, F., Hodgson, P. N., LEHTO, M., Thompson, L. F., Affholderbach, K., Bohrer, A., Brandt, S., Grupen, C., Hess, J., Ngac, A., Prange, G., Sieler, U., Borean, C., Giannini, G., He, H., Putz, J., Rothberg, J., Armstrong, S. R., Cranmer, K., Elmer, P., Ferguson, D. P., Gao, Y., Gonzalez, S., Hayes, O. J., Hu, H., Jin, S., Kile, J., McNamara, P. A., Nielsen, J., Orejudos, W., Pan, Y. B., Saadi, Y., Scott, L. J., von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H., Walsh, J., Wiedenmann, W., Wu, J., Wu, S. L., Wu, X., Zobernig, G. 2001; 21 (3): 423-441
  • Comparison of desipramine and cognitive/behavioral therapy in the treatment of elderly outpatients with mild-to-moderate depression AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY Thompson, L. W., Coon, D. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D., Sommer, B. R., Koin, D. 2001; 9 (3): 225-240

    Abstract

    The authors evaluated the efficacy of desipramine-alone, vs. cognitive/behavioral therapy-alone (CBT) vs. a combination of the two, for the treatment of depression in older adult outpatients. Patients (N=102) meeting criteria for major depressive disorder were randomly assigned to one of these three treatments for 16 to 20 therapy sessions. All treatments resulted in substantial improvement. In general, the CBT-Alone and Combined groups had similar levels of improvement. In most analyses, the Combined group showed greater improvement than the Desipramine-Alone group, whereas the CBT-Alone group showed only marginally better improvement. The combined therapies were most effective in patients who were more severely depressed, particularly when desipramine was at or above recommended stable dosage levels. The results indicate that psychotherapy can be an effective treatment for older adult outpatients with moderate levels of depression.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000170372300005

    View details for PubMedID 11481130

  • A comparison of marital interaction patterns between couples in which the husband does or does not have Alzheimer's disease JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY SERIES B-PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES Gallagher-Thompson, D., Dal Canto, P. G., Jacob, T., Thompson, L. W. 2001; 56 (3): S140-S150

    Abstract

    Objectives. Our main purpose was to examine similarities and differences in patterns of interpersonal interaction between Alzheimer's disease (AD) caregiving and noncaregiving couples (n = 54). Methods. Twenty-seven wives caring for moderately impaired husbands with probable AD and 27 noncaregiving wives from comparable sociodemographic backgrounds were videotaped in their homes during both mealtime and a future event planning task. In addition, they completed self-report questionnaires to assess depression, stress, relationship mutuality, and perceived hope. Results. Compared with their counterparts, caregiving wives reported higher levels of depression and stress, but similar shared values and closeness. For the three factors developed from the Marital Interaction Coding System (MICS, version IV; Supportive Facilitative, and Rapport Building), a complex pattern of results was found in which disease status, type of task, and gender interacted significantly. Noncaregiving couples were more interactive overall and expressed more support to each other. Caregiving wives were found to be most facilitative during the planning task, whereas AD husbands were highest on interactions that built rapport (e.g., smiling) during that same task. Caregiving wives actually increased their facilitative behavior from the mealtime to planning task, probably reflecting the increased demand characteristics of the latter.This study is one of a small body of literature to describe the negative impact of AD on spousal communication as observed and coded in two videotaped interaction situations in the home. Suggestions are made for future research, including the inclusion of longitudinal designs and non-Caucasian couples.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000168341400010

    View details for PubMedID 11316839

  • Analysis of a natural immune response against tumor antigens in a melanoma survivor: Lessons applicable to clinical trial evaluations 4th Keystone Symposium on Cellular Immunity and Immunotherapy of Cancer Yamshchikov, G., Thompson, L., Ross, W. G., Galavotti, H., Aquila, W., DEACON, D., Caldwell, J., Patterson, J. W., Hunt, D. F., Slingluff, C. L. AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH. 2001: 909S–916S

    Abstract

    The long-term survival of some patients with metastatic melanoma may be attributable in part to cellular immune responses to melanoma antigens. However, little is known about the level of CTL reactivity in vivo that is required for immunological control of tumor progression. In the present report, T-cell responses were evaluated with lymphocytes obtained from tumor-involved nodes and peripheral blood of a long-term melanoma survivor. Using an ELISPOT assay, naturally occurring functional T cells, which recognize the peptide ALLAVGATK (gp100(17-25)) plus two other HLA-A3 restricted peptides, were detected in a tumor-involved lymph node. The ALLAVGATK-reactive T cells were also evaluated by MHC-tetramers staining and were found to be CD8+ CD45RO+ L-selectin(-) CD11a+, suggesting that they are antigen experienced and have a memory phenotype. Unstimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes from the same patient demonstrated no detectable T-cell responses; however, a single stimulation with ALLAVGATK peptide in vitro resulted in a dramatic expansion of peptide-reactive CTLs. This patient, with evidence of tumor-reactive CTLs targeted to several tumor antigens in a tumor-involved lymph node and with evidence of a circulating memory T-cell response, has remained disease-free for 6 years, despite prior bulky nodal metastasis. In contrast, three HLA-A3+ patients with rapidly progressive metastatic melanoma had no detectable T-cell response in tumor-involved nodes or peripheral blood lymphocytes, even after peptide stimulation ex vivo. The presented data are consistent with a systemic polyvalent immune response against tumor in this long-term survivor. These data provide an estimate of the level of CTL response that may be associated with protection from tumor recurrence.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000168016200023

    View details for PubMedID 11300491

  • Search for supersymmetric particles in e(+)e(-) collisions at root s up to 202 GeV and mass limit for the lightest neutralino PHYSICS LETTERS B Barate, R., De Bonis, I., Decamp, D., Ghez, P., Goy, C., Jezequel, S., Lees, J. P., Martin, F., Merle, E., Minard, M. N., Pietrzyk, B., Bravo, S., Casado, M. P., Chmeissani, M., Crespo, J. M., Fernandez, E., Fernandez-Bosman, M., Garrido, L., Grauges, E., Lopez, J., Martinez, M., Merino, G., Miquel, R., Mir, L. M., Pacheco, A., Paneque, D., Ruiz, H., Colaleo, A., Creanza, D., De Filippis, N., de Palma, M., Iaselli, G., Maggi, G., Maggi, M., Nuzzo, S., Ranieri, A., Raso, G., Ruggieri, F., Selvaggi, G., Silvestris, L., Tempesta, P., Tricomi, A., Zito, C., Huang, X., Lin, J., Ouyang, Q., Wang, T., Xie, Y., Xu, R., Xue, S., Zhang, J., Zhang, L., Zhao, W., Abbaneo, D., Azzurri, P., Barklow, T., Boix, G., Buchmuller, O., Cattaneo, M., Cerutti, F., Clerbaux, B., Dissertori, G., Drevermann, H., Forty, R. W., Frank, M., Gianotti, F., Greening, T. C., Hansen, J. B., Harvey, J., Hutchcroft, D. E., Janot, P., JOST, B., Kado, M., Lemaitre, V., Maley, P., Mato, P., Minten, A., Moutoussi, A., Ranjard, F., Rolandi, L., Schlatter, D., Schmitt, M., Schneider, O., Spagnolo, P., Tejessy, W., Teubert, F., Tournefier, E., Valassi, A., Ward, J. J., Wright, A. E., Hansen, J. D., Hansen, J. R., Hansen, P. H., Nilsson, B. S., Waananen, A., Daskalakis, G., Kyriakis, A., Markou, C., Simopoulou, E., Vayaki, A., Blondel, A., Brient, J. C., Machefert, F., Rouge, A., Swynghedauw, M., Tanaka, R., Videau, H., Focardi, E., Parrini, G., Zachariadou, K., Antonelli, A., Antonelli, M., Bencivenni, G., Bologna, G., Bossi, F., Campana, P., Capon, G., Chiarella, V., Laurelli, P., Mannocchi, G., Murtas, F., Murtas, G. P., Passalacqua, L., Pepe-Altarelli, M., Chalmers, M., Halley, A. W., Kennedy, J., Lynch, J. G., Negus, P., O'Shea, V., Raeven, B., Smith, D., Teixeira-Dias, P., Thompson, A. S., Cavanaugh, R., Dhamotharan, S., Geweniger, C., Hanke, P., Hepp, V., Kluge, E. E., Leibenguth, G., Putzer, A., Tittel, K., Werner, S., Wunsch, M., Beuselinck, R., Binnie, D. M., Cameron, W., Davies, G., Dornan, P. J., Girone, M., Marinelli, N., Nowell, J., Przysiezniak, H., Sedgbeer, J. K., THOMPSON, J. C., Thomson, E., White, R., Ghete, V. M., Girtler, P., Kneringer, E., Kuhn, D., Rudolph, G., Bouhova-Thacker, E., Bowdery, C. K., Clarke, D. P., Ellis, G., Finch, A. J., Foster, F., Hughes, G., Jones, R. W., Pearson, M. R., Robertson, N. A., Smizanska, M., Giehl, I., Holldorfer, F., Jakobs, K., Kleinknecht, K., Krocker, M., Muller, A. S., Nurnberger, H. A., Quast, G., Renk, B., Rohne, E., Sander, H. G., Schmeling, S., Wachsmuth, H., Zeitnitz, C., Ziegler, T., Bonissent, A., Carr, J., Coyle, P., Curtil, C., Ealet, A., Fouchez, D., Leroy, O., Kachelhoffer, T., Payre, P., Rousseau, D., Tilquin, A., Aleppo, M., Gilardoni, S., Ragusa, F., David, A., Dietl, H., Ganis, G., Heister, A., Huttmann, K., Lutjens, G., Mannert, C., Manner, W., Moser, H. G., Schael, S., Settles, R., Stenzel, H., Wolf, G., Boucrot, J., Callot, O., Davier, M., Duflot, L., Grivaz, J. F., Heusse, P., Jacholkowska, A., Serin, L., Veillet, J. J., Videau, I., de Regie, J. B., Yuan, C., Zerwas, D., Bagliesi, G., Boccali, T., Calderini, G., Ciulli, V., Foa, L., Giammanco, A., Giassi, A., Ligabue, F., Messineo, A., Palla, F., Sanguinetti, G., Sciaba, A., Sguazzoni, G., Tenchini, R., Venturi, A., Verdini, P. G., Blair, G. A., Goles, J., Cowan, G., Green, M. G., Jones, L. T., Medcalf, T., Strong, J. A., Clifft, R. W., Edgecock, T. R., Norton, P. R., Tomalin, I. R., Bloch-Devaux, B., Boumediene, D., Colas, P., Fabbro, B., Lancon, E., Lemaire, M. C., Locci, E., Perez, P., Rander, J., Renardy, J. F., Rosowsky, A., Seager, P., Trabelsi, A., Tuchming, B., Vallage, B., Konstantinidis, N., Loomis, C., Litke, A. M., Taylor, G., Booth, C. N., Cartwright, S., Combley, F., Hodgson, P. N., LEHTO, M., Thompson, L. F., Affholderbach, K., Bohrer, A., Brandt, S., Grupen, C., Hess, J., Misiejuk, A., Prange, G., Sieler, U., Borean, C., Giannini, G., Gobbo, B., He, H., Putz, J., Rothberg, J., Wasserbaech, S., Armstrong, S. R., Cranmer, K., Elmer, P., Ferguson, D. P., Gao, Y., Gonzalez, S., Hayes, O. J., Hu, H., Jin, S., Kile, J., McNamara, P. A., Nielsen, J., Orejudos, W., Pan, Y. B., Saadi, Y., Scott, I. J., von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H., Walsh, J., Wiedenmann, W., Wu, J., Wu, S. L., Wu, X., Zobernig, G. 2001; 499 (1-2): 67-84
  • Observation of an excess in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at ALEPH PHYSICS LETTERS B Barate, R., De Bonis, I., Decamp, D., Ghez, P., Goy, C., Jezequel, S., Lees, J. P., Martin, F., Merle, E., Minard, M. N., Pietrzyk, B., Bravo, S., Casado, M. P., Chmeissani, M., Crespo, J. M., Fernandez, E., Fernandez-Bosman, M., Garrido, L., Grauges, E., Lopez, J., Martinez, M., Merino, G., Miquel, R., Mir, L. M., Pacheco, A., Paneque, D., Ruiz, H., Colaleo, A., Creanza, D., De Filippis, N., de Palma, M., Iaselli, G., Maggi, G., Maggi, M., Nuzzo, S., Ranieri, A., Raso, G., Ruggieri, E., Selvaggi, G., Silvestris, L., Tempesta, P., Tricomi, A., Zito, G., Huang, X., Lin, J., Ouyang, Q., Wang, T., Xie, Y., Xu, R., Xue, S., Zhang, J., Zhang, L., Zhao, W., Abbaneo, D., Azzurri, P., Barklow, T., Boix, G., Buchmuller, O., Cattaneo, M., Cerutti, F., Clerbaux, B., Dissertori, G., Drevermann, H., Forty, R. W., Frank, M., Gianotti, F., Greening, T. C., Hansen, J. B., Harvey, J., Hutchcroft, D. E., Janot, P., JOST, B., Kado, M., Lemaitre, V., Maley, P., Mato, P., Minten, A., Moutoussi, A., Ranjard, F., Rolandi, L., Schlatter, D., Schmitt, M., Schneider, O., Spagnolo, P., Tejessy, W., Teubert, F., Tournefier, E., Valassi, A., Ward, J. J., Wright, A. E., Ajaltouni, Z., Badaud, F., Dessagne, S., Falvard, A., Fayolle, D., Gay, P., Henrard, P., Jousset, J., Michel, B., Monteil, S., Montret, J. C., Pallin, D., Pascolo, J. M., Perret, P., Podlyski, F., Hansen, J. D., Hansen, J. R., Hansen, P. H., Nilsson, B. S., Waananen, A., Daskalakis, G., Kyriakis, A., Markou, C., Simopoulou, E., Vayaki, A., Blondel, A., Brient, J. C., Machefert, F., Rouge, A., Swynghedauw, M., Tanaka, R., Videau, H., Focardi, E., Parrini, G., Zachariadou, K., Antonelli, A., Antonelli, M., Bencivenni, G., Bologna, G., Bossi, F., Campana, P., Capon, G., Chiarella, V., Laurelli, P., Mannocchi, G., Murtas, F., Murtas, G. P., Passalacqua, L., Pepe-Altarelli, M., Chalmers, M., Halley, A. W., Kennedy, J., Lynch, J. G., Negus, P., O'Shea, V., Raeven, B., Smith, D., Teixeira-Dias, P., Thompson, A. S., Cavanaugh, R., Dhamotharan, S., Geweniger, C., Hanke, P., Hepp, V., Kluge, E. E., Leibenguth, G., Putzer, A., Tittel, K., Werner, S., Wunsch, M., Beuselinck, R., Binnie, D. M., Cameron, W., Davies, G., Dornan, P. J., Girone, M., Marinelli, N., Nowell, J., Przysiezniak, H., Sedgbeer, J. K., THOMPSON, J. C., Thomson, E., White, R., Ghete, V. M., Girtler, P., Kneringer, E., Kuhn, D., Rudolph, G., Bouhova-Thacker, E., Bowdery, C. K., Clarke, D. P., Ellis, G., Finch, A. J., Foster, F., Hughes, G., Jones, R. W., Pearson, M. R., Robertson, N. A., Smizanska, M., Giehl, I., Holldorfer, F., Jakobs, K., Kleinknecht, K., Krocker, M., Muller, A. S., Nurnberger, H. A., Quast, G., Renk, B., Rohne, E., Sander, H. G., Schmeling, S., Wachsmuth, H., Zeitnitz, C., Ziegler, T., Bonissent, A., Carr, J., Coyle, P., Curtil, C., Ealet, A., Fouchez, D., Leroy, O., Kachelhoffer, T., Payre, P., Rousseau, D., Tilquin, A., Aleppo, M., Gilardoni, S., Ragusa, F., David, A., Dietl, H., Ganis, G., Heister, A., Huttmann, K., Lutjens, G., Mannert, C., Manner, W., Moser, H. G., Schael, S., Settles, R., Stenzel, H., Wolf, G., Boucrot, J., Callot, O., Davier, M., Duflot, L., Grivaz, J. F., Heusse, P., Jacholkowska, A., Serin, L., Veillet, J. J., Videau, I., de Regie, J. B., Yuan, C., Zerwas, D., Bagliesi, G., Boccali, T., Calderini, G., Ciulli, V., Foa, L., Giammanco, A., Giassi, A., Ligabue, E., Messineo, A., Palla, F., Rizzo, G., Sanguinetti, G., Sciaba, A., Sguazzoni, G., Steinberger, J., Tenchini, R., Venturi, A., Verdini, P. G., Blair, G. A., Coles, J., Cowan, G., Green, M. G., Jones, L. T., Medcalf, T., Strong, J. A., Clifft, R. W., Edgecock, T. R., Norton, P. R., Tomalin, I. R., Bloch-Devaux, B., Boumediene, D., Colas, P., Fabbro, B., Lancon, E., Lemaire, M. C., Locci, E., Perez, P., Rander, J., Renardy, J. F., Rosowsky, A., Seager, P., Trabelsi, A., Tuchming, B., Vallage, B., Konstantinidis, N., Loomis, C., Litke, A. M., Taylor, G., Booth, C. N., Cartwright, S., Combley, F., Hodgson, P. N., LEHTO, M., Thompson, L. F., Affholderbach, K., Bohrer, A., Brandt, S., Grupen, C., Hess, J., Misiejuk, A., Prange, G., Sieler, U., Borean, C., Giannini, G., Gobbo, B., He, H., Putz, J., Rothberg, J., Wasserbaech, S., Armstrong, S. R., Cranmer, K., Elmer, P., Ferguson, D. P., Gao, Y., Gonzalez, S., Hayes, O. J., Hu, H., Jin, S., Kile, J., McNamara, P. A., Nielsen, J., Orejudos, W., Pan, Y. B., Saadi, Y., Scott, I. J., Shao, N., von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H., Walsh, J., Wiedenmann, W., Wu, J., Wu, S. L., Wu, X., Zobernig, G. 2000; 495 (1-2): 1-17
  • Presenilin-1 and-2 are molecular targets for gamma-secretase inhibitors JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY Seiffert, D., Bradley, J. D., Rominger, C. M., Rominger, D. H., Yang, F. D., Meredith, J. E., Tang, Q., Roach, A. H., Thompson, L. A., Spitz, S. M., Higaki, J. N., Prakash, S. R., Combs, A. P., Copeland, R. A., Arneric, S. P., Hartig, P. R., Robertson, D. W., Cordell, B., Stern, A. M., Olson, R. E., Zaczek, R. 2000; 275 (44): 34086-34091

    Abstract

    Presenilins are integral membrane protein involved in the production of amyloid beta-protein. Mutations of the presenilin-1 and -2 gene are associated with familial Alzheimer's disease and are thought to alter gamma-secretase cleavage of the beta-amyloid precursor protein, leading to increased production of longer and more amyloidogenic forms of A beta, the 4-kDa beta-peptide. Here, we show that radiolabeled gamma-secretase inhibitors bind to mammalian cell membranes, and a benzophenone analog specifically photocross-links three major membrane polypeptides. A positive correlation is observed among these compounds for inhibition of cellular A beta formation, inhibition of membrane binding and cross-linking. Immunological techniques establish N- and C-terminal fragments of presenilin-1 as specifically cross-linked polypeptides. Furthermore, binding of gamma-secretase inhibitors to embryonic membranes derived from presenilin-1 knockout embryos is reduced in a gene dose-dependent manner. In addition, C-terminal fragments of presenilin-2 are specifically cross-linked. Taken together, these results indicate that potent and selective gamma-secretase inhibitors block A beta formation by binding to presenilin-1 and -2.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000165095300015

    View details for PubMedID 10915801

  • alpha 2 macroglobulin and the risk of Alzheimer's disease NEUROLOGY Dodel, R. C., Du, Y., Bales, K. R., Gao, F., Eastwood, B., Glazier, B., Zimmer, R., Cordell, B., Hake, A., Evans, R., Gallagher-Thompson, D., Thompson, L. W., Tinklenberg, J. R., Pfefferbaum, A., SULLIVAN, E. V., Yesavage, J., Altstiel, L., Gasser, T., Farlow, M. R., Murphy, G. M., Paul, S. M. 2000; 54 (2): 438-442

    Abstract

    alpha2 Macroglobulin is a panproteinase inhibitor that is found immunohistochemically in neuritic plaques, a requisite neuropathologic feature of AD. Recently, a pentanucleotide deletion near the 5' end of the "bait region" of the alpha2 macroglobulin (A2M) gene was reported to be associated with AD in a large cohort of sibpairs, in which the mutation conferred a similar odds ratio with AD as the APOE-epsilon4 allele for carriers of at least one copy of the A2M gene (Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio, 3.56).We studied three independent association samples of AD patients (n = 309) with an age range of 50 to 94 years and representative controls (n = 281) to characterize the allele frequency of the pentanucleotide deletion in this cohort. We detected the mutation near the 5' splice site of exon 18 using standard PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods. The results were adjusted for age, gender, education, and APOE polymorphism.We found that the A2M gene polymorphism conferred an increased risk for AD, with an estimated Mantel-Haenszel ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.2; p = 0.025). There was no age- or gender-dependent increase in A2M gene allele frequencies in AD patients compared with controls. The combined sample showed the expected association between AD and APOE-epsilon 4. In one of our three samples there was an interaction between the A2M and APOE-epsilon4 genes, but the other two samples showed no interaction between the two risk factors.Our data support an association between the A2M gene and AD. This association is less pronounced, however, in our cohort than in the previously reported sample of sibpairs.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000085043800030

    View details for PubMedID 10668709

  • Physical and psychosocial correlates of hormone replacement therapy with chronically stressed postmenopausal women JOURNAL OF AGING AND HEALTH Steffen, A. M., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D., Koin, D. 1999; 11 (1): 3-26

    Abstract

    This study investigated the relationship between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use and physical and psychosocial functioning in a sample of chronically stressed older women.Participants (N = 94) were postmenopausal women caring for a parent or spouse with dementia. Caregivers were evaluated using both psychological and physical health indices.Caregivers receiving HRT reported lower levels of hostility and were less likely to report unpleasant interactions with members of their support network; these findings were unrelated to demographic variables, caregiving-related indices, or health behaviors. HRT recipients had lower 10-year risk scores for cardiovascular disease, but there were no group differences in stroke risk. The largest effects on hostility, depression, heart and stroke risk were observed in caregivers receiving a combination of estradiol and progesterone.HRT for postmenopausal women may promote positive outcomes for some, but not for all, affective states and cardiovascular variables vulnerable to chronic life stressors.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000078453600001

    View details for PubMedID 10848139

  • Experimental dendroclimatic reconstruction of the Southern Oscillation BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Stahle, D. W., D'Arrigo, R. D., Krusic, P. J., Cleaveland, M. K., Cook, E. R., Allan, R. J., Cole, J. E., Dunbar, R. B., Therrell, M. D., Gay, D. A., Moore, M. D., Stokes, M. A., Burns, B. T., Villanueva-Diaz, J., Thompson, L. G. 1998; 79 (10): 2137-2152
  • Alliance, technique, and their interactions in predicting outcome of behavioral, cognitive, and brief dynamic therapy 26th Annual Meeting of the Society-for-Psychotherapy-Research Gaston, L., Thompson, L., Gallagher, D., Cournoyer, L. G., Gagnon, R. ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD. 1998: 190–209
  • No association between the alpha 1-antichymotrypsin A allele and Alzheimer's disease NEUROLOGY Murphy, G. M., SULLIVAN, E. V., GALLAGHERTHOMPSON, D., Thompson, L. W., vanDuijn, C. M., Forno, L. S., Ellis, W. G., Jagust, W. J., Yesavage, J., Tinklenberg, J. R. 1997; 48 (5): 1313-1316

    Abstract

    The alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) A allele was recently associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the ACT AA genotype was reported to be more frequent in AD subjects with the apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon4 allele. We examined ACT and APOE genotypes in a sample of 160 subjects with probable AD and in 102 elderly control subjects. ACT A allele frequencies were similar in AD subjects (0.503) and elderly controls (0.519). In addition, we found no evidence that in AD the AA genotype is more frequent in subjects with the APOE epsilon4 allele than in those without it. Our results do not support an association between the ACT A allele and AD.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997WZ77800030

    View details for PubMedID 9153464

  • Psychotherapeutic interventions with older adults in outpatient and extended care settings Conference on Shades of Gray - Depression Among the Old and Frail-A Multidisciplinary Symposium Thompson, L. W., Gallagher-Thompson, D. SPRINGER PUBL CO. 1997: 169–184
  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy and treatment for late-life depression Symposium on Geropsychiatric Advances - New Therapies and Older Patients, at the 147th Annual Meeting of the American-Psychiatric-Association Thompson, L. W. PHYSICIANS POSTGRADUATE PRESS. 1996: 29–37

    Abstract

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a brief psychotherapy stemming from a model that emphasizes the importance of distorted thoughts and the lack of pleasurable activities in the development of affective disorders. The focus of the therapy can be on either eliminating distorted thought systems or increasing the number of pleasant events that occur on a daily basis, or both. The highly structured therapy presents various skills for patients to learn through class exercises and homework assignments. Older adults respond well to cognitive-behavioral therapy, reporting that they appreciate the structure and the opportunity to learn skills that can help when they are confronted with new stresses. Many also like the focus on here-and-now problems rather than the past. A few treatment modifications are necessary to accommodate community elders complaining of depression. Generally, information must be presented more slowly, taking advantage of multiple modes of presentation. To maintain an active learning process, elder patients should be asked frequently to summarize the material being presented. They should also be given handouts of complex materials and encouraged to maintain notebooks. Other modifications may be required for special populations of older patients.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1996UR32200005

    View details for PubMedID 8647790

  • Linear and nonlinear changes in mood between psychotherapy sessions: Implications for treatment outcome and relapse risk PSYCHOTHERAPY RESEARCH Thompson, M. G., Thompson, L., GALLAGHERTHOMPSON, D. 1995; 5 (4): 327-336
  • EFFECTS OF A MUSIC-THERAPY STRATEGY ON DEPRESSED OLDER ADULTS JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY HANSER, S. B., Thompson, L. W. 1994; 49 (6): P265-P269

    Abstract

    A music-facilitated psychoeducational strategy was developed as a cost-effective and accessible intervention for older adults experiencing symptoms of depression, distress, and anxiety. Thirty older adults who had been diagnosed with major or minor depressive disorder were randomly assigned to one of three 8-week conditions: (1) a home-based program where participants learned music listening stress reduction techniques at weekly home visits by a music therapist; (2) a self-administered program where participants applied these same techniques with moderate therapist intervention (a weekly telephone call); or (3) a wait list control. Participants in both music conditions performed significantly better than the controls on standardized tests of depression, distress, self-esteem, and mood. These improvements were clinically significant and maintained over a 9-month follow-up period. The potential for this type of intervention with homebound elders and others who have limited access to services is discussed.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1994PR34200002

    View details for PubMedID 7963281

  • VERBAL-LEARNING AND OR MEMORY IMPROVES WITH GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN OLDER SUBJECTS WITH NON-INSULIN-DEPENDENT DIABETES-MELLITUS JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY GRADMAN, T. J., Laws, A., Thompson, L. W., Reaven, G. M. 1993; 41 (12): 1305-1312

    Abstract

    To determine whether cognitive function improves with improved glycemic control in older subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM). We hypothesized that with improved glycemic control: 1) learning and memory, 2) attention, and 3) complex perceptual-motor function would improve, but that 4) simple perceptual-motor function would not.Non-randomized control trial.Aging Study Unit, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center.Thirty subjects with NIDDM; 17 on oral hypoglycemic agents; 13 untreated at study entry. Thirteen normal controls.Subjects on oral hypoglycemic agents were taken off medications. After 1 month, they and previously untreated subjects began treatment with glipizide. Dose was titrated up weekly until fasting plasma glucose was less than 7.8 mmol/L or maximal dose (40 mg/day). Controls received no medication.Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycated hemoglobin, and measures of cognitive function in four general categories: 1) learning and memory, 2) ability to sustain attention, 3) complex perceptual-motor function, and 4) simple perceptual-motor function. All were evaluated in subjects with NIDDM at baseline (T1), after 1-month washout (T2), and after 2 (T3) and 4 months (T4) of optimal glycemic control or maximal dose. Controls were evaluated at the same intervals.FPG and glycated hemoglobin rose in previously treated subjects from T1 to T2 (9.4 +/- SEM 0.4 to 14.7 +/- 0.7 mmol/L and 10.9 +/- 0.7% to 12.2 +/- 0.6%, respectively) but were unchanged in previously untreated subjects (11.3 +/- 0.6 to 11.8 +/- 0.9 mmol/L and 10.9 +/- 0.7% to 11.7 +/- 0.7%). With glipizide treatment, there was a decrease in FPG level at T3 (9.4 +/- 0.5 mmol/L in previously treated, 6.9 +/- 0.4 mmol/L in previously untreated), which persisted at T4. Glycated hemoglobin fell similarly. FPG and glycated hemoglobin were unchanged in controls. As hypothesized, learning and memory improved over time with treatment in both groups of subjects but was unchanged in controls (P < 0.05). Detailed analysis indicated that the improvement occurred primarily in the learning of verbal material. Contrary to hypothesis, attention and complex perceptual-motor function did not show improvement. As expected, simple perceptual-motor function did not show any improvement with treatment.The results are consistent with previous findings that poor glycemic control in older subjects with NIDDM is associated with decreased cognitive functioning, and suggest that verbal learning and memory may improve with improved glycemic control.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1993MK55900004

    View details for PubMedID 8227912

  • CHANGES IN GRIEF AND MENTAL-HEALTH OF BEREAVED SPOUSES OF OLDER SUICIDES JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY FARBEROW, N. L., GALLAGHERTHOMPSON, D., GILEWSKI, M., Thompson, L. 1992; 47 (6): P357-P366

    Abstract

    Comparisons are made of the impact of a suicide death on the surviving spouse (55 years and older) with that of a natural death on spouse survivors and a married nonbereaved control group over a bereavement period of 2 1/2 years after death. Regardless of mode of death, the loss of a loved one is a difficult psychological trauma, accompanied by depression, confusion, and pervasive feelings of emptiness. Few differences in the impact of the deaths in the early months of bereavement were reported, but changes appeared over the course of the 2 1/2-year measurement period. Compared with natural death survivors, the process of bereavement was found to be more difficult for the survivors of a suicide death, whose severe depressive feelings do not seem to lessen significantly and whose feelings of mental health do not seem to improve until after the first year. Women, in general, report greater feelings than men of anxiety, tension, and apprehension, especially within the first 6 months. By the end of the observation period, most of the differences between the two bereaved groups have disappeared, and both report functioning adequately despite continuing feelings of sadness and loss.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992JX15700001

    View details for PubMedID 1430857

  • ATENOLOL COMPARED WITH NIFEDIPINE - EFFECT ON COGNITIVE FUNCTION AND MOOD IN ELDERLY HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS ANNALS OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Skinner, M. H., FUTTERMAN, A., Morrissette, D., Thompson, L. W., Hoffman, B. B., Blaschke, T. F. 1992; 116 (8): 615-623

    Abstract

    To compare the effects of atenolol and nifedipine on mood and cognitive function in elderly hypertensive patients.Randomized, double-blind, crossover trial.Thirty-one elderly volunteers (7 women and 4 men) 60 to 81 years of age with mild to moderate hypertension were recruited from the general community and a Veterans Affairs hospital hypertension clinic. Six volunteers withdrew at early phases of the study for reasons unrelated to adverse drug effects.Participants had 2 weeks of placebo, to 6 weeks of titration with atenolol or nifedipine, and weeks of treatment followed by similar periods with the other drug.Psychometric tests designed to assess mood and cognitive function.In the group first treated with nifedipine, the summed recall score on the Buschke selective reminding test (a test of verbal learning and memory) decreased by 9.3 words (95% CI, 2.8 to 15.6 words), or 0%, during nifedipine treatment compared with placebo (P = 0.031). The group first treated with atenolol showed no improvement in summed recall scores when results seen during atenolol therapy and placebo administration were compared (P = 0.10); however, this group had an improvement of 16.1 words (CI, 5.6 to 26.5 words), or of 16%, when the atenolol score was compared with the nifedipine score (P = 0.026). In the group first treated with nifedipine, 6 of 11 patients 55%) showed a decrease of 5 words or more during nifedipine therapy compared with placebo, whereas only 1 of the 14 patients (7%) in the group first treated with atenolol showed a similar decrease (P less than 0.01). On the digit symbol test (a psychomotor test), patients treated first with atenolol tended to improve, whereas patients treated first with nifedipine tended to decline. The difference between nifedipine and atenolol, in terms of the change from the score seen during placebo, was 4.3 codings (CI, 0.7 to 7.9 codings) or 10% (P = 0.043). No statistically significant differences were seen between nifedipine and atenolol therapy regarding the other measures of psychomotor ability, sustained attention, motor performance, verbal fluency, or abstract reasoning, and no effects of either drug on mood or psychopathologic symptoms were noted.Although atenolol and nifedipine are generally free of gross effects on cognition or mood, nifedipine may subtly impair learning and memory in some elderly hypertensive patients.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992HN84400002

    View details for PubMedID 1546860

  • ENDOGENOUS-DEPRESSION IN THE ELDERLY - PREVALENCE AND AGREEMENT AMONG MEASURES JOURNAL OF CONSULTING AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY GALLAGHERTHOMPSON, D., HANLEYPETERSON, P., Ironson, G., FUTTERMAN, A., Zeiss, A., Thompson, L. W. 1992; 60 (2): 300-303

    Abstract

    This article describes agreement among diagnoses made according to five definitions of endogenous depression in a sample of 99 depressed elders and discusses the relationship among these systems and selected demographic and clinical characteristics. Poor to fair agreement was generally demonstrated, except for Research Diagnostic Criteria (Spitzer, Endicott, & Robins, 1978) and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd ed., rev. (American Psychiatric Association, 1987), which demonstrated excellent agreement. Mostly, demographic and clinical variables (e.g., severity of depression) were unrelated to endogeneity diagnoses. The conclusion was reached that these criteria are not all measuring the same construct in older adults and that the relationship between depression severity and endogeneity should be discussed in terms of specific definitions rather than general terms.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992HM68200019

    View details for PubMedID 1592961

  • THE ROLE OF SOCIAL SUPPORTS IN THE BEREAVEMENT PROCESS OF SURVIVING SPOUSES OF SUICIDE AND NATURAL DEATHS SUICIDE AND LIFE-THREATENING BEHAVIOR FARBEROW, N. L., GALLAGHERTHOMPSON, D., GILEWSKI, M., Thompson, L. 1992; 22 (1): 107-124

    Abstract

    This report examines the changing role of social supports in the bereavement of spouses of elderly suicide and natural deaths, focusing on differences and similarities in relation to gender, time, and mode of death. Measurements were obtained 4 times after death (within 2 months, at 6 months, at 12 months, and at 2 to 2 1/2 years) on 79% of the 108 survivors of elderly suicide, 89% of the 199 natural death survivors, and 79% of the nonbereaved controls. The results indicated that the suicide survivors received significantly less emotional support for their feelings of depression and grief than the natural death survivors, and that they did not confide in the persons in their network any more than the nonbereaved controls did. Women report receiving more support overall than men. A low spot in social supports occurred at the 6-month point after loss for both bereaved groups, but primarily in practical help received by natural death survivors. By the end of the second year, both practical and emotional supports had increased to at least the same level as immediately after death.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992HX81400009

    View details for PubMedID 1579980

  • THE EFFECTS OF LATE-LIFE SPOUSAL BEREAVEMENT OVER A 30-MONTH INTERVAL PSYCHOLOGY AND AGING Thompson, L. W., GALLAGHERTHOMPSON, D., FUTTERMAN, A., GILEWSKI, M. J., Peterson, J. 1991; 6 (3): 434-441

    Abstract

    Self-report measures of grief, depression, and general psychopathology were studied in widows and widowers over a 2.5-year period following death of their partner. A comparison sample of men and women was also followed for the same period. Differences in severity of depression and psychopathology previously reported at 2 months postloss (Gallagher, Breckenridge, Thompson, & Peterson, 1983) diminished to nonsignificant levels at 12 and 30 months. However, significant differences between bereaved and comparison subjects on measures of grief were still apparent 30 months after spousal loss. A main effect of gender for depression and psychopathology (but not for grief) was found at 2 and 12 months: Women reported more distress than men regardless of bereavement status. Results indicate that the experience of grief persists for at least 30 months in both older men and women who have lost their spouse.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991GF57600011

    View details for PubMedID 1930760

  • INTERACTION OF DEPRESSION AND BEREAVEMENT ON MENTAL-HEALTH IN THE ELDERLY PSYCHOLOGY AND AGING GILEWSKI, M. J., GALLAGHER, D. E., Thompson, L. W., FARBEROW, N. L. 1991; 6 (1): 67-75

    Abstract

    Three hundred ninety-three elderly adults aged 55 and older were divided into 1 of 9 subgroups in a 3 (bereavement group: survivors of spouses who died by natural death or by suicide and nonbereaved control Ss) x 3 (depression group: none, mild, and moderate-severe) design over 4 times of measurement--1 month, 6 months, 1 year, and 2.5 years after death of spouse. Significant Bereavement x Depression Group effects were obtained on Brief Symptom Inventory scores. The moderate-severe depression/suicide subgroup had the greatest psychiatric complications with bereavement. Results indicated that elderly persons with significant clinical depression at the time of a spouse's death were at significant risk for psychological complications during the bereavement process, and survivors of spouses who had committed suicide were even more at risk within the greatest depression group.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991FA55300009

    View details for PubMedID 2029370

  • MAINTENANCE OF GAINS VERSUS RELAPSE FOLLOWING BRIEF PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR DEPRESSION JOURNAL OF CONSULTING AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY GALLAGHERTHOMPSON, D., HANLEYPETERSON, P., Thompson, L. W. 1990; 58 (3): 371-374

    Abstract

    Cross-sectional and longitudinal data are presented from a 2-year follow-up study of 91 older adults, initially diagnosed as in an episode of major depressive disorder (MDD), who were treated with brief cognitive, behavioral, or psychodynamic psychotherapy. Using research diagnostic criteria (RDC), 52%, 58%, and 70% of the sample did not meet criteria for any RDC depressive disorder at posttherapy, and 12- and 24-month follow-ups, respectively. There were no significant differences in response rate by therapy modality. Using Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE; Shapiro & Keller, 1979; Keller et al., 1987) methodology, we noted that patients not depressed at posttreatment remained depression-free for longer time periods than those who were minor or MDD. These rates compare favorably with published reports on younger depressed patients.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990DJ32800017

    View details for PubMedID 2365900

  • RETROSPECTIVE ASSESSMENT OF MARITAL ADJUSTMENT AND DEPRESSION DURING THE 1ST 2 YEARS OF SPOUSAL BEREAVEMENT PSYCHOLOGY AND AGING FUTTERMAN, A., Gallagher, D., Thompson, L. W., LOVETT, S., GILEWSKI, M. 1990; 5 (2): 277-283

    Abstract

    Two hundred twelve bereaved elders rated marital adjustment using items drawn from the Locke and Wallace (1959) Marital Adjustment Test and completed the Beck Depression Inventory 2 months, 12 months, and 30 months after the loss of their spouses. Their responses were compared with those of 162 nonbereaved individuals of comparable age who were tested at the same times. More positive ratings of marital adjustment were made by bereaved subjects than by nonbereaved subjects. Among nonbereaved elders, more severe ratings of depression were associated with lower ratings of marital adjustment. In the bereaved sample, however, the opposite was found: More severe ratings of depression were associated with higher ratings of marital adjustment. This pattern of results changed only slightly over the 2.5-year course of bereavement and was not influenced by gender. These results are discussed in terms of cognitive processes (e.g., idealization) that influence retrospective assessments of marital adjustment during bereavement.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990DH07000015

    View details for PubMedID 2378693

  • WORD-TO-WORD VARIATION IN ERP COMPONENT LATENCIES - SPOKEN WORDS BRAIN AND LANGUAGE Woodward, S. H., Owens, J., Thompson, L. W. 1990; 38 (4): 488-503

    Abstract

    Data were collected shedding light on the brain electrical activity underlying word recognition. Subjects listened to a list of 48 spoken words in six random orders under two instructional sets: first to "think about the meanings of the words," and second, to learn the list. The scalp EEG associated with hearing and identifying the words was recorded at F3, F4, Cz, P3, P4, Pz, and Oz. Standard within-subjects time-locked averaging across words showed a late negative-positive complex with N2-P3 topography, the negative component peaking around 480 msec, the positive component peaking around 830 msec. Averaging within words across subjects uncovered considerable latency variability in both components. Within-word N2 and P3 component latencies covaried with word durations and with the "recognition points" predicted for the words by the "cohort theory" of word recognition. N2 latencies corresponded closely to the "N400" effect elicited with semantically incongruous sentence-final spoken words. Implications for ERP investigations of language processing are discussed.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990DL26900003

    View details for PubMedID 2375978

  • RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HYPERGLYCEMIA AND COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN OLDER NIDDM PATIENTS DIABETES CARE Reaven, G. M., Thompson, L. W., NAHUM, D., HASKINS, E. 1990; 13 (1): 16-21

    Abstract

    The nature and extent of cognitive impairment was examined in 29 healthy elderly subjects (mean age 69.8 yr) with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and 30 demographically similar nondiabetic community volunteers (mean age 68 yr). Measures of verbal learning, abstract reasoning, and complex psychomotor functioning were performed more poorly by diabetic than nondiabetic subjects. Conversely, there were no between-group differences in performance on tasks involving pure motor speed and simple verbal abilities. Within the diabetic group, individuals with poorer metabolic control performed more poorly on tasks involving learning, reasoning, and complex psychomotor performance, although this relationship was not evident for simple verbal or motor tasks. These data indicate that older people with NIDDM who are functioning well and perceive themselves as in good health are likely to manifest greater deficits than healthy elderly people in processing complex verbal or nonverbal material. Possible explanatory mechanisms are discussed, and directions for future research are explored.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990CG58200003

    View details for PubMedID 2298111

  • IMPACT OF CONFIRMING PATIENT EXPECTATIONS OF CHANGE PROCESSES IN BEHAVIORAL, COGNITIVE, AND BRIEF DYNAMIC PSYCHOTHERAPY PSYCHOTHERAPY Gaston, L., Marmar, C. R., Gallagher, D., Thompson, L. W. 1989; 26 (3): 296-302
  • PREVALENCE OF DEPRESSION IN FAMILY CAREGIVERS GERONTOLOGIST Gallagher, D., Rose, J., Rivera, P., LOVETT, S., Thompson, L. W. 1989; 29 (4): 449-456

    Abstract

    Family caregivers who sought help to increase their coping skills (N = 158) and caregivers who volunteered for a longitudinal study of Alzheimer's disease (N = 58) were screened for depression. Among help-seekers, 46% had depression according to Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC), but among non-help-seekers, only 18% met this criterion. In general, women were more depressed than men, but no major differences in the extent of depression were found in those who cared for more impaired persons.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989AK23600004

    View details for PubMedID 2521102

  • ALLIANCE AND OUTCOME IN LATE-LIFE DEPRESSION JOURNAL OF NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASE Marmar, C. R., Gaston, L., Gallagher, D., Thompson, L. W. 1989; 177 (8): 464-472

    Abstract

    Older adults who met criteria for major depressive disorder were randomly assigned to behavioral, cognitive, or brief dynamic therapy. Symptoms were equally reduced across the three treatment conditions. Early in treatment, alliance ratings were obtained from both therapists and patients and were related to outcome. We calculated one therapist alliance composite score and five patient alliance factor scores. In general, no agreement was found between therapists' and patients' judgments of alliance. Levels of alliance were found to be not significantly different across the three treatment conditions. For the sample as a whole, only the patient factor of Patient Commitment was found to be associated with depressive symptoms after treatment, with the strongest findings in the cognitive therapy condition. The Patient Commitment factor uniquely contributed to outcome over and above the contribution of initial symptomatology and symptomatic change at midpoint in therapy. Expected trends of association with outcome were observed for the therapist alliance composite score in brief dynamic therapy and for the patient factor of Patient Working Capacity in both cognitive and brief dynamic therapy. Findings are discussed in terms of their theoretical and clinical implications.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989AK86300003

    View details for PubMedID 2760597

  • THE ROLE OF ANTICIPATORY BEREAVEMENT IN OLDER WOMENS ADJUSTMENT TO WIDOWHOOD GERONTOLOGIST Hill, C. D., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher, D. 1988; 28 (6): 792-796

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988R358800009

    View details for PubMedID 3253148

  • HOPELESSNESS AS A MEASURE OF SUICIDAL INTENT IN THE DEPRESSED ELDERLY PSYCHOLOGY AND AGING Hill, R. D., Gallagher, D., Thompson, L. W., Ishida, T. 1988; 3 (3): 230-232

    Abstract

    Suicidal ideation in the elderly has been related to depression, changes in health, and anticipation of a limited future. The present study examined the Hopelessness Scale (HS) and its relation to these factors in a depressed geriatric population. A total of 120 elderly outpatients, who had applied to receive psychotherapy for depression, completed the HS, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), health ratings, and the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia (SADS) at intake. The HS was found to be internally consistent, and a principal components analysis revealed three distinct factors that were related to hope, feelings of giving up, and future planning. The HS, BDI, and health ratings were predictive of suicidal ideation as measured by specific items in the SADS. The relation among suicidal ideation hopelessness, depression, and health perceptions for the depressed aged are discussed.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988P961800002

    View details for PubMedID 3268263

  • RELATION OF PATIENT PRETREATMENT CHARACTERISTICS TO THE THERAPEUTIC ALLIANCE IN DIVERSE PSYCHOTHERAPIES JOURNAL OF CONSULTING AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Gaston, L., Marmar, C. R., Thompson, L. W., Gallagher, D. 1988; 56 (4): 483-489

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988P528000001

    View details for PubMedID 3198803

  • ASSESSMENT OF LATE-LIFE DEPRESSION PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY BULLETIN Thompson, L. W., FUTTERMAN, A., Gallagher, D. 1988; 24 (4): 577-586

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988T349900010

    View details for PubMedID 3074318

  • Personality disorder and outcome in the treatment of late-life depression. Journal of geriatric psychiatry Thompson, L. W., Gallagher, D., Czirr, R. 1988; 21 (2): 133-153

    View details for PubMedID 3216093

  • AN EXAMINATION OF THE EARLY IMPACT OF BEREAVEMENT ON PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS IN SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE GERONTOLOGIST FARBEROW, N. L., GALLAGHER, D. E., GILEWSKI, M. J., Thompson, L. W. 1987; 27 (5): 592-598

    View details for Web of Science ID A1987K368400011

    View details for PubMedID 3678898

  • COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF PSYCHOTHERAPIES FOR DEPRESSED ELDERS JOURNAL OF CONSULTING AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Thompson, L. W., Gallagher, D., BRECKENRIDGE, J. S. 1987; 55 (3): 385-390

    View details for Web of Science ID A1987H521000016

    View details for PubMedID 3597953

  • Assessment of depression and dementia during the late years. Annual review of gerontology & geriatrics Thompson, L. W., Gong, V., HASKINS, E., Gallagher, D. 1987; 7: 295-324

    View details for PubMedID 3120754

  • Effects of age on the late positive and slow wave components of the evoked potential: implications for clinical application. Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology. Supplement Thompson, L. W., Patterson, J. V., Michalewski, H. J. 1987; 39: 413-425

    View details for PubMedID 3308423

  • CHARACTERISTIC DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS OF BEREAVED ELDERS JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Breckenridge, J. N., Gallagher, D., Thompson, L. W., Peterson, J. 1986; 41 (2): 163-168

    Abstract

    Profiles of 21 self-reported depression symptoms from 196 recently bereaved elders (mean age = 67.70 years) were compared with those of 145 comparison control participants (mean age = 70.01). Responses from bereaved individuals were recorded approximately 2 months following the loss of their spouse. Comparison participants were married or, if single, had not lost a spouse to death or divorce in the previous 5 years. Results were consistent with the literature concerning normative bereavement reactions; that is, although bereaved people reported several features associated with depression, the likelihood of self-deprecatory cognitions was no greater among them than among control participants. Bereaved individuals were significantly more likely to report heightened dysphoria, dissatisfaction, and somatic disturbances typical of depression, even when variations in age, sex, number of years married, and educational and occupational status were taken into account. Differentiation of bereaved/control participants on some dysphoric features was dependent on the number of years married.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986A295400006

    View details for PubMedID 3950341

  • COGNITIVE VARIABLES AND THE PREDICTION OF OUTCOME FOLLOWING AN INTERVENTION FOR CONTROLLING DEPRESSION COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH BISNO, B., Thompson, L. W., Breckenridge, J., Gallagher, D. 1985; 9 (5): 527-538
  • SOLICITATION OF ELDERLY DEPRESSIVES FOR TREATMENT OUTCOME RESEARCH - A COMPARISON OF REFERRAL SOURCES JOURNAL OF CONSULTING AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY BRECKENRIDGE, J. S., Zeiss, A. M., Breckenridge, J. N., Gallagher, D., Thompson, L. W. 1985; 53 (4): 552-554

    View details for Web of Science ID A1985ANA9600020

    View details for PubMedID 4031216

  • EFFICACY OF PSYCHOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF LATE-LIFE DEPRESSION ADVANCES IN BEHAVIOUR RESEARCH AND THERAPY Thompson, L. W., Gallagher, D. 1984; 6 (2): 127-139
  • DIFFERENTIAL RECALL AS A FUNCTION OF MOOD DISORDER IN CLINICALLY DEPRESSED-PATIENTS - BETWEEN-SUBJECT AND WITHIN-SUBJECT DIFFERENCES JOURNAL OF ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY Slife, B. D., Thompson, L. W., Miura, S., Shapiro, J. L. 1984; 93 (4): 391-400
  • EFFECTS OF BEREAVEMENT ON SELF-PERCEPTIONS OF PHYSICAL HEALTH IN ELDERLY WIDOWS AND WIDOWERS JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Thompson, L. W., Breckenridge, J. N., Gallagher, D., Peterson, J. 1984; 39 (3): 309-314

    Abstract

    Multiple indices of self-perceived physical health for 212 older widows and widowers, 2 months following the loss of their spouse, were contrasted with the responses of 162 comparison control participants for a comparable period. Although physician visits and hospitalizations were reported to be no more frequent among the bereaved, they did report significantly more recently developed or worsened illnesses, greater use of medications, and poorer health ratings in general. These differences were independent of sex and variation in socioeconomic background. Significant sex differences, although minimal, indicated poorer perceived health among women.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1984SQ65100010

    View details for PubMedID 6715808

  • EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PROFESSIONALS AND NONPROFESSIONALS AS INSTRUCTORS OF COPING WITH DEPRESSION CLASSES FOR ELDERS GERONTOLOGIST Thompson, L. W., Gallagher, D., Nies, G., Epstein, D. 1983; 23 (4): 390-396

    View details for Web of Science ID A1983RC14500009

    View details for PubMedID 6618248

  • EFFECTS OF BEREAVEMENT ON INDICATORS OF MENTAL-HEALTH IN ELDERLY WIDOWS AND WIDOWERS JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY GALLAGHER, D. E., Breckenridge, J. N., Thompson, L. W., Peterson, J. A. 1983; 38 (5): 565-571

    Abstract

    The effects of bereavement on self-report measures of psychological distress were evaluated in widows and widowers at approximately 2 months after the death of a spouse. These data represent the first time of measurement in an ongoing longitudinal study of conjugal bereavement in elders. Responses of 95 male and 104 female elderly bereaved on measures of grief, depression, global severity of psychological distress, and general mental health functioning were compared with those of 79 male and female elderly individuals who were not currently suffering from the loss of a spouse. In general, means for the bereaved group were not in ranges consistent with the presence of serious psychopathology. Women in both groups reported greater distress than men, and significant sex-by-bereavement-status interactions on mental health measures were not observed.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1983RF89100008

    View details for PubMedID 6886312

  • EFFECTIVENESS OF PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR BOTH ENDOGENOUS AND NONENDOGENOUS DEPRESSION IN OLDER ADULT OUTPATIENTS JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY GALLAGHER, D. E., Thompson, L. W. 1983; 38 (6): 707-712

    Abstract

    This study explored the effectiveness of brief psychotherapies for treatment of elderly depressed outpatients. All were in a current episode of major depressive disorder, but half the sample (n = 15) presented with endogenous symptomatology as well. Patients were assigned to either behavioral, cognitive, or insight-oriented psychotherapy for 16 sessions over a 12-week period. Evaluation occurred before and after therapy, and at four times during a 1-year follow-up interval. Nonendogenous patients responded more favorably to psychotherapy; this differential effect persisted throughout follow-up. Significant improvement, however, was made by some endogenous patients. One-third were not depressed by termination of therapy, and seven others were notably improved. Eight of 15 had not relapsed at 1-year follow-up.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1983RQ44200012

    View details for PubMedID 6630906

  • MEMORY COMPLAINT AND PERFORMANCE IN NORMAL AND DEPRESSED OLDER ADULTS EXPERIMENTAL AGING RESEARCH POPKIN, S. J., Gallagher, D., Thompson, L. W., Moore, M. 1982; 8 (3-4): 141-145

    Abstract

    The present study investigated the influence of depression on memory complaints and performance in a sample of community dwelling older adults (N = 41). Complaints were significantly more frequent in the clinically depressed subsample. However, their actual performance on tests of immediate and delayed recall did not differ significantly from the performance of nondepressed older adults. In addition, results indicated that depressives who responded favorably to a program of psychotherapy demonstrated significant reductions in levels of memory complaints at post-treatment assessment. Implications of these data for further research are discussed.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1982PR75100002

    View details for PubMedID 7169071

  • RELIABILITY AND FACTOR STRUCTURE OF THE ZUNG SELF-RATING DEPRESSION SCALE IN 3 AGE-GROUPS ESSENCE McGarvey, B., Gallagher, D., Thompson, L. W., ZELINSKI, E. 1982; 5 (2): 141-152
  • SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES BETWEEN NORMAL GRIEF AND DEPRESSION IN OLDER ADULTS ESSENCE Gallagher, D., Breckenridge, J. N., Thompson, L. W., DESSONVILLE, C., Amaral, P. 1982; 5 (2): 127-140
  • RELIABILITY OF THE BECK DEPRESSION INVENTORY WITH OLDER ADULTS JOURNAL OF CONSULTING AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Gallagher, D., Nies, G., Thompson, L. W. 1982; 50 (1): 152-153

    View details for Web of Science ID A1982NF71300021

    View details for PubMedID 7056913

  • A COMPARISON OF THE EMITTED LATE POSITIVE POTENTIAL IN OLDER AND YOUNG-ADULTS JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Michalewski, H. J., Patterson, J. V., BOWMAN, T. E., LITZLEMAN, D. K., Thompson, L. W. 1982; 37 (1): 52-58

    Abstract

    An emitted potential paradigm was used to investigate P3 scalp potentials in a group of older individuals (M = 66.8 years) and a group of younger persons (M = 22.0 years). Since no physical stimulus is necessary to elicit an emitted potential, an age comparison of P3 can be made which does not depend on normal sensory transmission channels. Both traditional and latency corrected averages to missing auditory clicks were analyzed from electrodes placed over midline frontal, central, and parietal locations. Results indicated that while the scalp distribution of emitted potentials was similar for both age groups, amplitudes at Pz and Cz were significantly smaller in the older group. Latency corrected potentials indicated similar trends but did not reach significant levels. No group differences were seen for N2 or P3 latencies for either traditional or corrected averages. The findings support age differences in the amplitudes of the P3 component and suggest that when P3 is not synchronized with a sensory event, latencies in this component may not be sensitive to age differences.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1982MX70000008

    View details for PubMedID 7053398

  • PSYCHO-SOCIAL FACTORS AFFECTING ADAPTATION TO BEREAVEMENT IN THE ELDERLY INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AGING & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT GALLAGHER, D. E., Thompson, L. W., Peterson, J. A. 1982; 14 (2): 79-95
  • Psychosocial factors affecting adaptation to bereavement in the elderly. International journal of aging & human development GALLAGHER, D. E., Thompson, L. W., Peterson, J. A. 1981; 14 (2): 79-95

    Abstract

    A spouse's death requires more readjustment on the part of the bereaved than any other stressful life event. This finding holds across the many age groups and cultural backgrounds that have been studied. Although it is unclear as to whether the stress of bereavement is greater for women than for men, for the young than for the old, for one socioeconomic level or for another, a critical review of the literatures suggests the following: 1) Negative changes in physical health, mortality rate and mental health status usually accompany widowhood; 2) Complex social-psychological variables such as the individual's characteristic ways of coping with stress (coping strength), the adequacy of the social network - plus other factors such as income and religious commitment - may attenuate widowhood's negative impact. Suggestions for further research include studies exploring differential adaptation to widowhood across age groups and in elderly men and women, and longitudinal studies tracing the process of recovery from acute grief.

    View details for PubMedID 7044992

  • AGE AND SEX-DIFFERENCES IN THE HUMAN AUDITORY BRAIN-STEM RESPONSE JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Patterson, J. V., Michalewski, H. J., Thompson, L. W., BOWMAN, T. E., Litzelman, D. K. 1981; 36 (4): 455-462

    Abstract

    Age and sex differences in the brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) were investigated in older (60 to 79 yrs), middle-aged (40 to 59 years), and young (20 to 39 yrs) individuals. Within each age group the number of males (N = 10) and females (N = 10) were divided equally. Scalp potentials were recorded from the vertex to clicks presented at 60, 70, and 80 dB(SL) for stimulus rates of 5, 10, and 15 clicks/sec. Results indicated that older adults had longer latencies at Wave III than either middle-aged or young adults. Age effects were also found for Waves I, II, and IV but were restricted to the lowest intensity and were more evident in older males than females. Significant sex effects showed that the females in each group had shorter Wave IV and V latencies than males. The results suggest that age affects neural propagation at the level of the olivary complex (Wave III) and that BAER latencies are also influenced by the sex of the individual.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1981LW08400014

    View details for PubMedID 7252079

  • Brain amine hypothesis. Psychopharmacology bulletin Michalewski, H. J., Thompson, L. W., Patterson, J. V. 1980; 16 (2): 16-18

    View details for PubMedID 7367559

  • RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CORTICAL-ALPHA AND SKELETAL-MUSCLE BLOOD-FLOW IN A FEEDBACK TASK PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR Poon, L. W., Peterson, E., Williams, R. B., Thompson, L. W., BURDETTE, L. J. 1980; 24 (3): 617-619

    View details for Web of Science ID A1980JK89300032

    View details for PubMedID 7375583

  • VISUAL EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS AND DEPRESSION IN THE ELDERLY NEUROBIOLOGY OF AGING Litzelman, D. K., Thompson, L. W., Michalewski, H. J., Patterson, J. V., BOWMAN, T. E. 1980; 1 (2): 111-118

    Abstract

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during a visual discrimination task from nine elderly individuals (mean=68.1 years), diagnosed as having major depressive disorder, and nine age-matched controls (mean=68.0 years). During the task, subjects pressed a switch to targets (the number 9) and ignored background (the number 6) and novel stimuli (random designs). Novel and target stimuli were both interspersed infrequently in the sequence of background stimuli. Scalp electrical activity was recorded from midline frontal (Fz), central (Cz), and parietal (Pz) sites. Depressives were characterized by lengthened response times and increased number of errors across the session. Speed of response was also found to vary directly with clinical status. Additionally, ERP correlates of depression in the elderly were found: N1 was more prolonged for target than non-target stimuli in the depressed group; P2 was larger for all conditions; N2 was uniformly small across the scalp, whereas the controls showed small N2 amplitudes only at Fz; large P3s appeared in trials following the novel stimuli in the depressed but not in the control group. These results are interpreted in terms of the symptomatology associated with depression (i.e., distractability, impaired short-term memory or concentration, indecisiveness) and possible age-related changes in the ERP scalp distribution.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1980LJ31500001

    View details for PubMedID 24279933

  • AUDITORY AVERAGED EVOKED-POTENTIALS AND AGING - FACTORS OF STIMULUS, TASK AND TOPOGRAPHY BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY SMITH, D. B., Michalewski, H. J., Brent, G. A., Thompson, L. W. 1980; 11 (2): 135-151

    Abstract

    The averaged evoked potential to brief tones was compared for 10 young and 10 elderly female subjects. The amplitudes of the sensory components (P1, N1 and P2) were not affected by an infrequent change in pitch of the tones or instructing subjects to count or ignore them; but overall the elderly had a larger P1 and smaller P2 amplitude and a difference in the scalp distribution of P2. Repetition of the tones produced a decrement in these sensory components and a differential one for young and old subjects A slow potential complex consisting of components N2, P3 and SW appeared to changes in tone pitch and became more pronounced when attention was directed to the tones. Overall smaller SPs for oder subjects were interpreted as evidence for a change with age in the cortical representation of the orienting response. Topographical analysis of SPs indicated diminished activity in frontal (Fz) electrodes for elderly persons, suggestive of an enhanced aging process in the frontal cortices.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1980LY35600004

    View details for PubMedID 7272385

  • SEX-DIFFERENCES IN THE AMPLITUDES AND LATENCIES OF THE HUMAN AUDITORY BRAIN-STEM POTENTIAL ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY AND CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY Michalewski, H. J., Thompson, L. W., Patterson, J. V., BOWMAN, T. E., Litzelman, D. 1980; 48 (3): 351-356

    Abstract

    Sex differences in the amplitudes and latencies of the auditory brain stem potential (BAEP) were investigated using 3 levels of intensity and 3 stimulus presentation rates. The females displayed consistently larger BAEPs for waves IV, V, VI, VII than the males. The only latency differences which reached significance over all the intensities and rates occurred for wave V. The females showed significantly shorter wave V latencies than the males. Since hearing losses and individually determined click thresholds were comparable between the two groups tested, the exact sources of the uneven distribution of amplitude and latency effects are in question. Differences in the relative distances of the anatomical generators are considered in accounting for the sex differences. Because the precise origin of the sex differences cannot be stated with certainty at this time, attempts to develop normative data for the BAEP should consider the possible influences of sex differences.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1980JJ57200009

    View details for PubMedID 6153354

  • AGE-DIFFERENCES IN THE CONTINGENT NEGATIVE-VARIATION (CNV) - REDUCED FRONTAL ACTIVITY IN THE ELDERLY JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Michalewski, H. J., Thompson, L. W., SMITH, D. B., Patterson, J. V., BOWMAN, T. E., Litzelman, D., Brent, G. 1980; 35 (4): 542-549

    Abstract

    The effects of distraction on the contingent negative variation (CNV) were investigated in a group of 11 elderly (mean = 72.2 years) and a group of 12 young (mean = 23.3 years) subjects. Scalp electrical activity was recorded from midline sites at frontal, central, and parietal locations. Three experimental conditions included Recall, No Recall, and Control situations. In the Recall, or distraction condition, spoken consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) letters were presented concurrently with the CNV signal interval and were recalled by the subjects after each trial. The No Recall condition was similar to the Recall task except that subjects were not required to repeat the CVSs. The Control condition presented a standard S1 - S2 CNV situation without CVCs. Amplitudes of the CNV, reaction times (RTs), and heart rate (HR) served as indices of distraction. The effects of distraction for both age groups indicated reduced CNVs, lengthened RTs, and elevated HRs. However, a significant age by electrode interaction revealed that while CNV amplitudes at central and parietal sites were comparable between age groups, amplitudes at the frontal placement were consistently reduced in the elderly compared to the young in all conditions. The finding of diminished frontal activity, as measured by the CNV, suggests a process of selective cortical aging and possible cellular loss which may be linked to performance deficits.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1980JY27900010

    View details for PubMedID 7400547

  • COMPARISONS OF SWEAT GLAND COUNTS, ELECTRODERMAL ACTIVITY, AND HABITUATION BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG AND OLD GROUPS OF SUBJECTS PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY CATANIA, J. J., Thompson, L. W., MICHALEWSKI, H. A., BOWMAN, T. E. 1980; 17 (2): 146-152

    View details for Web of Science ID A1980JL51700008

    View details for PubMedID 7375617

  • AGE-DIFFERENCES IN VISUAL SENSORY MEMORY JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Walsh, D. A., Thompson, L. W. 1978; 33 (3): 383-387

    Abstract

    Age differences in visual sensory memory were studied using the direct measure procedure of Haber and Standing (1969) -- the longest interstimulus interval at which subjects reported a single stimulus as continuous was measured. The visual storage of the young (mean age 24 years) was found to persist for 289 msec compared to 248 for the old (mean age 67 years). Similar estimates of sensory memory duration were obtained when either monoptic or dichoptic stimulus presentations were employed, supporting the idea that visual storage is centrally mediated for both age groups. The relevance of these findings for age differences in the registration of information into primary and secondary memory and their implications for the stimulus persistence hypothesis are considered. The appropriateness and validity of the persistence of form task for studies of sensory memory and aging are also discussed.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1978EX01800010

    View details for PubMedID 748430

  • ORIENTING TASK EFFECTS ON EDR AND FREE-RECALL IN 3 AGE-GROUPS JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Zelinski, E. M., Walsh, D. A., Thompson, L. W. 1978; 33 (2): 239-245

    Abstract

    The present investigation was designed to examine the effects of orienting task-controlled processing on electrodermal response and free recall at two delay intervals for 94 young, 49 young-old (age 55 to 70), and 61 old-old (age 71 to 85) individuals. Subjects were presented with a list of 25 words and performed one of the following tasks: semantic, nonsemantic, or passive listening, presented in an incidental memory paradigm, or intentional memorization. Recall was obtained 2 min or 48 hours after list presentation. At the 2-min delay, the pattern of recall across tasks for the young-old and old-old subjects was similar to that of college students. Overall, the old-old recalled fewer words than the young and young-old, while the young-old recalled as many words as the young. After 48 hours, the task-related recall pattern was observed only in the young group. The skin conductance data indicated that task effects were similar across the three age groups and that response magnitude was lower in the old-old than the two younger groups. No differences in skin conductance were found between the young and young-old. Age differences in memory processing suggest that difficulties in delayed retrieval of semantically encoded words may increase during late adult years. Differences in electrodermal responses in the old-old compared to the young and young-old suggest that the range of autonomic responsivitiy to task demands may become restricted in advanced age.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1978EP78100011

    View details for PubMedID 627707

  • Relationship between central and autonomic nervous system activity: correlates of psychomotor performance in elderly men. Experimental aging research Harkins, S. W., Thompson, L. W., Moss, S. F., NOWLIN, J. B. 1976; 2 (5): 409-423

    Abstract

    The relationship between heart rate deceleration (HRD) and the contingent negative variation (CNV) was evaluated in 12 healthy, elderly men during performance of a signaled reaction time task. While amplitude of the CNV and HRD did parallel RT, CNV alone was found to be predictive of individual differences in speed of response indicating that phasic concordance of these physiological responses is probably not an important factor in age changes in RT. The results indicate the probable importance of central physiological indices such as the CNV over peripheral events such as HRD in the evaluation of RT performance in elderly individuals.

    View details for PubMedID 1017457

  • EFFECTS OF HYPERBARIC-OXYGEN ON BEHAVIORAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL MEASURES IN ELDERLY DEMENTED PATIENTS JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Thompson, L. W., Davis, G. C., Obrist, W. D., Heyman, A. 1976; 31 (1): 23-28

    Abstract

    This study tested the effects of repeated exposures to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on psychological, electroencephalographic, and cerebral blood flow measures in 8 patients with cerebrovascular disease and 13 patients with cortical atrophy. Patients were exposed to 100% oxygen at 2.5 atmospheres absolute twice daily for 90 min. for 15 days. No significant changes were observed in any of the measures in either group. Level of initial functioning was not associated with change due to treatment. Results suggest that HBO has no therapeutic effect in patients with moderate to severe dementia.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1976BA69000004

    View details for PubMedID 1244400

  • AVERAGE EVOKED-POTENTIAL CHANGES AS A FUNCTION OF PROCESSING COMPLEXITY PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY Poon, L. W., Thompson, L. W., Marsh, G. R. 1976; 13 (1): 43-49

    View details for Web of Science ID A1976BB90600008

    View details for PubMedID 1244629

  • CHANGES OF ANTEROPOSTERIOR DISTRIBUTION OF CNV AND LATE POSITIVE COMPONENT AS A FUNCTION OF INFORMATION-PROCESSING DEMANDS PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY Poon, L. W., Thompson, L. W., Williams, R. B., Marsh, G. R. 1974; 11 (6): 660-673

    View details for Web of Science ID A1974U659400006

    View details for PubMedID 4438550

  • EFFECTS OF AGE ON CONTINGENT NEGATIVE VARIATION IN A PITCH DISCRIMINATION TASK JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Marsh, G. R., Thompson, L. W. 1973; 28 (1): 56-62

    View details for Web of Science ID A1973O531500008

    View details for PubMedID 4683199

  • CNV CORRELATES OF TASK DIFFICULTY AND ACCURACY OF PITCH DISCRIMINATION PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY DELSE, F. C., Thompson, L. W., Marsh, G. R. 1972; 9 (1): 53-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1972M317100006

    View details for PubMedID 5019749

  • Cardiac functioning and reaction time in relation to age. journal of genetic psychology BOTWINICK, J., Thompson, L. W. 1971; 119 (1st Half): 127-132

    View details for PubMedID 5118840

  • EFFECT OF INCREASED PRESSURES OF NORMOXIC HELIUM, NITROGEN AND NEON ON EEG AND REACTION TIME IN MAN AEROSPACE MEDICINE Townsend, R. E., Thompson, L. W., SULG, I. 1971; 42 (8): 843-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1971K239900007

    View details for PubMedID 5098575

  • Stimulation in different phases of the cardiac cycle and reaction time. Psychophysiology Thompson, L. W., BOTWINICK, J. 1970; 7 (1): 57-65

    View details for PubMedID 5492737

  • INVESTIGATION OF CHANGES IN BLOOD GASES, EEG AND VIGILANCE BEHAVIOR DURING INCREASED OXYGEN PRESSURE IN OLD AND YOUNG COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS ANAESTHESIST TALTON, I. H., Thompson, L. W., DENT, S. J., FERRARI, H. A. 1970; 19 (7): 241-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1970H034600002

    View details for PubMedID 5521106

  • HEART RATE CHANGES IN A REACTION TIME EXPERIMENT WITH YOUNG AND AGED SUBJECTS JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Morris, J. D., Thompson, L. W. 1969; 24 (3): 269-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1969E437100001

    View details for PubMedID 5822599

  • Age difference in reaction time: an artifact? Gerontologist BOTWINICK, J., Thompson, L. W. 1968; 8 (1): 25-28

    View details for PubMedID 5648381

  • Age differences in the relationship between EEG arousal and reaction time. journal of psychology Thompson, L. W., BOTWINICK, J. 1968; 68 (2): 167-172

    View details for PubMedID 5641693

  • A research note on individual differences in reaction time in relation to age. journal of genetic psychology BOTWINICK, J., Thompson, L. W. 1968; 112 (1st Half): 73-75

    View details for PubMedID 5651357

  • VARIATIONS IN ARTERIAL BLOOD VALUES BEFORE DURING AND AFTER NEUROLEPTANALGESIA SOUTHERN MEDICAL JOURNAL FERRARI, H. A., Thompson, L. W., TALTON, I., Stephen, C. R. 1968; 61 (9): 947-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1968B722300010

    View details for PubMedID 5676578

  • EFFECTS OF SENESCENCE ON TEMPORAL RESOLUTION OF SOMESTHETIC STIMULI PRESENTED TO 1 HAND OR BOTH JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Axelrod, S., Thompson, L. W., Cohen, L. D. 1968; 23 (2): 191-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1968A991100015

    View details for PubMedID 5643883

  • PRACTICE OF SPEEDED RESPONSE IN RELATION TO AGE SEX AND SET JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY BOTWINIC, J., Thompson, L. W. 1967; 22 (1): 72-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A19678817100013

    View details for PubMedID 6015770

  • The role of the preparatory interval in the relationship between EEG alpha-blocking and reaction time. Psychophysiology Thompson, L. W., BOTWINICK, J. 1966; 3 (2): 131-142

    View details for PubMedID 5927828

  • Components of reaction time in relation to age and sex. journal of genetic psychology BOTWINICK, J., Thompson, L. W. 1966; 108 (2d Half): 175-183

    View details for PubMedID 6012443

  • PREMOTOR AND MOTOR COMPONENTS OF REACTION TIME JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY BOTWINIC, J., Thompson, L. W. 1966; 71 (1): 9-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A19667233800002

    View details for PubMedID 5902149

  • ELECTROCORTICAL REACTIVITY AND LEARNING IN ELDERLY JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Thompson, L. W., Wilson, S. 1966; 21 (1): 45-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A19667196200007

    View details for PubMedID 5901657

  • SENESCENCE AND VISUAL IDENTIFICATION OF TACTUAL-KINESTHETIC FORMS JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Thompson, L. W., Axelrod, S., Cohen, L. D. 1965; 20 (2): 244-249

    View details for Web of Science ID A1965CKP2600024

    View details for PubMedID 14284804

  • RELATION OF SERUM-CHOLESTEROL TO AGE, SEX, AND RACE IN AN ELDERLY COMMUNITY GROUP JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Thompson, L. W., Nichols, C. R., Obrist, W. D. 1965; 20 (2): 160-164

    View details for Web of Science ID A1965CKP2600007

    View details for PubMedID 14284788

  • COMPARISON OF EEG CHANGES IN LEARNING AND OVERLEARNING OF NONSENSE SYLLABLES PSYCHOLOGICAL REPORTS Thompson, L. W., Thompson, V. D. 1965; 16 (2): 339-344

    View details for Web of Science ID A1965CHE2500002

    View details for PubMedID 14285823

  • EEG CORRELATES OF VERBAL LEARNING + OVERLEARNING ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY AND CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY Thompson, L. W., Obrist, W. D. 1964; 16 (4): 332-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A19641213B00047

    View details for PubMedID 14141752

  • EFFECTS OF AGE, PRESENTATION SPEED, AND SENSORY MODALITY ON PERFORMANCE OF A VIGILANCE TASK JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY Thompson, L. W., Opton, E., Cohen, L. D. 1963; 18 (4): 366-369

    View details for Web of Science ID A1963CAY8900012

    View details for PubMedID 14071818