Clinical Focus


  • Internal Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Medical Director, Stanford Primary Care- Los Altos (2018 - Present)
  • Clinical Instructor, Stanford University Stanford School of Medicine Medicine, general medicine disciplines (2013 - 2018)

Honors & Awards


  • Chief Resident, Internal Medicine, UC San Diego (2012-2013)
  • Outstanding Teaching Award, UC San Diego School of Medicine (2012)

Professional Education


  • Residency: UCSD Internal Medicine Residency (2013) CA
  • Medical Education: College of Physicians and Surgeons Columbia University (2009) NY
  • Board Certification: American Board of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine (2012)
  • Board Certification, American Board of Internal Medicine (2013)
  • Chief Resident, UC San Diego, Internal Medicine (2013)
  • Residency, UC San Diego, Internal Medicine (2012)
  • MD, Columbia University (2009)
  • BA, UC Berkeley, Pre-Medical; Philosophy (2005)

All Publications


  • Relationship of socio-demographics, comorbidities, symptoms and healthcare access with early COVID-19 presentation and disease severity. BMC infectious diseases Vaughan, L. n., Veruttipong, D. n., Shaw, J. G., Levy, N. n., Edwards, L. n., Winget, M. n. 2021; 21 (1): 40

    Abstract

    COVID-19 studies are primarily from the inpatient setting, skewing towards severe disease. Race and comorbidities predict hospitalization, however, ambulatory presentation of milder COVID-19 disease and characteristics associated with progression to severe disease is not well-understood.We conducted a retrospective chart review including all COVID-19 positive cases from Stanford Health Care (SHC) in March 2020 to assess demographics, comorbidities and symptoms in relationship to: 1) their access point of testing (outpatient, inpatient, and emergency room (ER)) and 2) development of severe disease.Two hundred fifty-seven patients tested positive: 127 (49%), 96 (37%), and 34 (13%) at outpatient, ER and inpatient, respectively. Overall, 61% were age < 55; age > 75 was rarer in outpatient setting (11%) than ER (14%) or inpatient (24%). Most patients presented with cough (86%), fever/chills (76%), or fatigue (63%). 65% of inpatients reported shortness of breath compared to 30-32% of outpatients and ER patients. Ethnic/minority patients had a significantly higher risk of developing severe disease (Asian OR = 4.8 [1.6-14.2], Hispanic OR = 3.6 [1.1-11.9]). Medicare-insured patients were marginally more likely (OR = 4.0 [0.9-17.8]). Other factors associated with developing severe disease included kidney disease (OR = 6.1 [1.0-38.1]), cardiovascular disease (OR = 4.7 [1.0-22.1], shortness of breath (OR = 5.4 [2.3-12.6]) and GI symptoms (OR = 3.3 [1.4-7.7]; hypertension without concomitant CVD or kidney disease was marginally significant (OR = 2.3 [0.8-6.5]).Early widespread symptomatic testing for COVID-19 in Silicon Valley included many less severely ill patients. Thorough manual review of symptomatology reconfirms the heterogeneity of COVID-19 symptoms, and challenges in using clinical characteristics to predict decline. We re-demonstrate that socio-demographics are consistently associated with severity.

    View details for DOI 10.1186/s12879-021-05764-x

    View details for PubMedID 33421991

  • NARRATIVE ONCOLOGY: AN INTERVENTION TO PROMOTE RESIDENT WELLBEING AND PATIENT-CENTERED CARE ON AN EMOTIONALLY EXHAUSTING INPATIENT ROTATION Stevenson, M., Edwards, L., Kim, Y., Kim, C., Johnson, T., Garvert, D. SPRINGER. 2020: S754
  • Qualitative Assessment of Rapid System Transformation to Primary Care Video Visits at an Academic Medical Center. Annals of internal medicine Srinivasan, M. n., Asch, S. n., Vilendrer, S. n., Thomas, S. C., Bajra, R. n., Barman, L. n., Edwards, L. M., Filipowicz, H. n., Giang, L. n., Jee, O. n., Mahoney, M. n., Nelligan, I. n., Phadke, A. J., Torres, E. n., Artandi, M. n. 2020

    Abstract

    The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic spurred health systems across the world to quickly shift from in-person visits to safer video visits.To seek stakeholder perspectives on video visits' acceptability and effect 3 weeks after near-total transition to video visits.Semistructured qualitative interviews.6 Stanford general primary care and express care clinics at 6 northern California sites, with 81 providers, 123 staff, and 97 614 patient visits in 2019.Fifty-three program participants (overlapping roles as medical providers [n = 20], medical assistants [n = 16], nurses [n = 4], technologists [n = 4], and administrators [n = 13]) were interviewed about video visit transition and challenges.In 3 weeks, express care and primary care video visits increased from less than 10% to greater than 80% and from less than 10% to greater than 75%, respectively. New video visit providers received video visit training and care quality feedback. New system workflows were created to accommodate the new visit method.Nine faculty, trained in qualitative research methods, conducted 53 stakeholder interviews in 4 days using purposeful (administrators and technologists) and convenience (medical assistant, nurses, and providers) sampling. A rapid qualitative analytic approach for thematic analysis was used.The analysis revealed 12 themes, including Pandemic as Catalyst; Joy in Medicine; Safety in Medicine; Slipping Through the Cracks; My Role, Redefined; and The New Normal. Themes were analyzed using the RE-AIM (reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance) framework to identify critical issues for continued program utilization.Evaluation was done immediately after deployment. Although viewpoints may have evolved later, immediate evaluation allowed for prompt program changes and identified broader issues to address for program sustainability.After pandemic-related systems transformation at Stanford, critical issues to sustain video visit long-term viability were identified. Specifically, technology ease of use must improve and support multiparty videoconferencing. Providers should be able to care for their patients, regardless of geography. Providers need decision-making support with virtual examination training and home-based patient diagnostics. Finally, ongoing video visit reimbursement should be commensurate with value to the patients' health and well-being.Stanford Department of Medicine and Stanford Health Care.

    View details for DOI 10.7326/M20-1814

    View details for PubMedID 32628536