Education & Certifications


  • Bachelor of Science, Georgetown University, Biology (2013)

All Publications


  • Stochastic Endogenous Replication Stress Causes ATR-Triggered Fluctuations in CDK2 Activity that Dynamically Adjust Global DNA Synthesis Rates. Cell systems Daigh, L. H., Liu, C., Chung, M., Cimprich, K. A., Meyer, T. 2018

    Abstract

    Faithful DNA replication is challenged by stalling of replication forks during Sphase. Replication stress is further increased in cancer cells or in response to genotoxic insults. Using live single-cell image analysis, we found that CDK2 activity fluctuates throughout an unperturbed Sphase. We show that CDK2 fluctuations result from transient ATR signals triggered by stochastic replication stress events. In turn, fluctuating endogenous CDK2 activity causes corresponding decreases and increases in DNA synthesis rates, linking changes in stochastic replication stress to fluctuating global DNA replication rates throughout Sphase. Moreover, cells that re-enter the cell cycle after mitogen stimulation have increased CDK2 fluctuations and prolonged Sphase resulting from increased replication stress-induced CDK2 suppression. Thus, our study reveals a dynamic control principle for DNA replication whereby CDK2 activity is suppressed and fluctuates throughout Sphase to continually adjust global DNA synthesis rates in response to recurring stochastic replication stress events.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cels.2018.05.011

    View details for PubMedID 29909278

  • Arginine-Rich Motifs Are Not Required for Hepatitis Delta Virus RNA Binding Activity of the Hepatitis Delta Antigen JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY Daigh, L. H., Griffin, B. L., Soroush, A., Mamedov, M. R., Casey, J. L. 2013; 87 (15): 8665-8674

    Abstract

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) replication and packaging require interactions between the unbranched rodlike structure of HDV RNA and hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg), a basic, disordered, oligomeric protein. The tendency of the protein to bind nonspecifically to nucleic acids has impeded analysis of HDV RNA protein complexes and conclusive determination of the regions of HDAg involved in RNA binding. The most widely cited model suggests that RNA binding involves two proposed arginine-rich motifs (ARMs I and II) in the middle of HDAg. However, other studies have questioned the roles of the ARMs. Here, binding activity was analyzed in vitro using HDAg-160, a C-terminal truncation that binds with high affinity and specificity to HDV RNA segments in vitro. Mutation of the core arginines of ARM I or ARM II in HDAg-160 did not diminish binding to HDV unbranched rodlike RNA. These same mutations did not abolish the ability of full-length HDAg to inhibit HDV RNA editing in cells, an activity that involves RNA binding. Moreover, only the N-terminal region of the protein, which does not contain the ARMs, was cross-linked to a bound HDV RNA segment in vitro. These results indicate that the amino-terminal region of HDAg is in close contact with the RNA and that the proposed ARMs are not required for binding HDV RNA. Binding was not reduced by mutation of additional clusters of basic amino acids. This result is consistent with an RNA-protein complex that is formed via numerous contacts between the RNA and each HDAg monomer.

    View details for DOI 10.1128/JVI.00929-13

    View details for Web of Science ID 000321590200035

    View details for PubMedID 23740973

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC3719807