Stanford Advisors


All Publications


  • Conducting Polymer-Based Granular Hydrogels for Injectable 3D Cell Scaffolds ADVANCED MATERIALS TECHNOLOGIES Feig, V., Santhanam, S., McConnell, K., Liu, K., Azadian, M., Brunel, L., Huang, Z., Tran, H., George, P. M., Bao, Z. 2021
  • 3D Bioprinting using UNIversal Orthogonal Network (UNION) Bioinks. Advanced functional materials Hull, S. M., Lindsay, C. D., Brunel, L. G., Shiwarski, D. J., Tashman, J. W., Roth, J. G., Myung, D. n., Feinberg, A. W., Heilshorn, S. C. 2021; 31 (7)

    Abstract

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a promising technology to produce tissue-like structures, but a lack of diversity in bioinks is a major limitation. Ideally each cell type would be printed in its own customizable bioink. To fulfill this need for a universally applicable bioink strategy, we developed a versatile, bioorthogonal bioink crosslinking mechanism that is cell compatible and works with a range of polymers. We term this family of materials UNIversal, Orthogonal Network (UNION) bioinks. As demonstration of UNION bioink versatility, gelatin, hyaluronic acid (HA), recombinant elastin-like protein (ELP), and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were each used as backbone polymers to create inks with storage moduli spanning 200 to 10,000 Pa. Because UNION bioinks are crosslinked by a common chemistry, multiple materials can be printed together to form a unified, cohesive structure. This approach is compatible with any support bath that enables diffusion of UNION crosslinkers. Both matrix-adherent human corneal mesenchymal stromal cells and non-matrix-adherent human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor spheroids were printed with UNION bioinks. The cells retained high viability and expressed characteristic phenotypic markers after printing. Thus, UNION bioinks are a versatile strategy to expand the toolkit of customizable materials available for 3D bioprinting.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/adfm.202007983

    View details for PubMedID 33613150

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7888563