Clinical Focus


  • Internal Medicine
  • Medical Oncology

Academic Appointments


Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Committee Member, Quality Subcommittee, American Society of Hematology (2009 - 2013)
  • Committee Member, Communications Committee, American Society of Hematology (2014 - Present)
  • Committee Member, Cancer Disparities, American Society of Clinical Oncology (2015 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Fellowship:Stanford University Hematology and Oncology Program (2013) CA
  • Board Certification: Oncology, American Board of Internal Medicine (2013)
  • Medical Education:University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (2006) NC
  • MPH, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Maternal/Child Health (2005)
  • Residency:Stanford University School of Medicine (2009) CA
  • Board Certification, American Board of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine (2010)
  • Board Certification, Oncology, American Board of Internal Medicine (2013)
  • Fellowship, Clinical Excellence Research Center, Trend-bending innovations in cancer care (2013)
  • Fellowship, Primary Care and Outcomes Research, Health Services and Outcomes Research (2015)
  • MS, Stanford University, Health Sevices Research (2015)

Clinical Trials


  • Health Care Coach Support in Reducing Acute Care Use and Cost in Patients With Cancer Recruiting

    This randomized pilot clinical trial studies health care coach support in reducing acute care use and cost in patients with cancer. Health care coach support may help cancer patients to make decisions about their care that matches what is important to them with symptom management.

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  • Improving Supportive Care For Patients With Thoracic Malignancies Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to use a proactive approach to improve symptom management of patients with thoracic malignancies. In this pilot study, the investigators propose to evaluate the feasibility of using outbound, proactive telephone symptom assessment strategies and measure the efficacy of this approach on patient satisfaction with their care, patient activation, quality of life and use of healthcare resources.

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  • Lay Health Worker Engage, Educate, and Encourage Patients to Share Recruiting

    The purpose of the LEAPS program is to understand how a trained lay health worker who engages with newly diagnosed patients after a diagnosis of an advanced stage of cancer can help to engage patients in advance care planning, improve patient satisfaction with their decision-making, activation, quality of life, and healthcare resource utilization.

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  • Engagement of Patients With Advanced Cancer Not Recruiting

    The Engagement of Patients with Advanced Cancer is an intervention that utilizes well-trained lay health coaches to engage patients and their families in goals of care and shared decision-making after a diagnosis of advanced cancer. Although lay health workers have never been tested in this role, we hypothesize that lay health workers can feasibly improve goals of care documentation and help to reduce unwanted healthcare utilization at the end of life for Veterans diagnosed with new advanced stages of cancer and those diagnosed with recurrent disease.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial.

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  • Lay Health Worker Led Symptom Assessment Intervention Not Recruiting

    Rising costs and poor patient experiences from under-treated symptoms have led to the demand for approaches that improve patients' experiences and lower expenditures. This observational project assigned a lay health worker to concuct proactive symptom assessments intended to achieve these goals among patients with advanced cancer.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial.

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  • Safety and Efficacy Study of Abraxane as Maintenance Treatment After Abraxane Plus Carboplatin in 1st Line Stage IIIB / IV Squamous Cell Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Not Recruiting

    Maintenance treatment of advanced stage squamous cell NSCLC. Phase III, randomized, open-label, multi-center study of nab-paclitaxel with best supportive care (BSC) or BSC alone as maintenance treatment after response or stable disease (SD) with nab-paclitaxel plus carboplatin as induction in subjects with stage IIIB/IV squamous cell NSCLC. Subjects who discontinued treatment from the maintenance part for any reason other than withdrawal of consent, lost to follow-up, or death, were entered into Follow-up that had a visit 28 day after progression or discontinuation. Those who entered Follow-up without progression continued with follow-up scans according to system organ class (SOC) until documentation of progression of disease and followed for survival. Additionally, subjects were followed up for OS by phone approximately every 90 days for up to approximately 1.5 years after the primary analysis.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cancer Clinical Trials Office (CCTO), 650-498-7061.

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All Publications


  • Perspectives of Health Care Payer Organizations on Cancer Care Delivery Redesign: A National Study. Journal of oncology practice Patel, M. I., Moore, D., Bhattacharya, J., Milstein, A., Coker, T. R. 2018: JOP1800331

    Abstract

    INTRODUCTION:: Despite advancements in cancer care, persistent gaps remain in the delivery of high-value end-of-life cancer care. The aim of this study was to examine views of health care payer organization stakeholders on approaches to the redesign of end-of-life cancer care delivery strategies to improve care.METHODS:: We conducted semistructured interviews with 34 key stakeholders (eg, chief medical officers, medical directors) in 12 health plans and 22 medical group organizations across the United States. We recorded, transcribed, and analyzed interviews using the constant comparative method of qualitative analysis.RESULTS:: Participants endorsed strategies to redesign end-of-life cancer care delivery to improve end-of-life care. Participants supported the use of nonprofessionals to deliver some cancer services through alternative formats (eg, telephone, Internet) and delivery of services in nonclinical settings. Participants reported that using nonprofessional providers to offer some services, such as goals of care discussions and symptom assessments, via telephone in community-based settings or in patients' homes, may be more effective and efficient ways to deliver high-value cancer care services. Participants described challenges to redesign, including coordination with and acceptance by oncology providers and payment models required to financially support clinical changes. Some participants suggested solutions, including providing funding and logistic support to encourage implementation of care delivery innovations and to financially reward practices for delivery of high-value end-of-life cancer care services.CONCLUSION:: Stakeholders from payer organizations endorsed opportunities to redesign cancer care delivery, and some are willing to provide logistic, design, and financial support to practices interested in improving end-of-life cancer care.

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JOP.18.00331

    View details for PubMedID 30444666

  • Oncologists' Views on Using Value to Guide Cancer Treatment Decisions VALUE IN HEALTH Gidwani-Marszowski, R., Nevedal, A. L., Blayney, D. W., Patel, M., Kelly, P., Timko, C., Ramchandran, K., Murrell, S. S., Asch, S. M. 2018; 21 (8): 931–37

    Abstract

    Cancer costs have increased substantially in the past decades, prompting specialty societies to urge oncologists to consider value in clinical decision making. Despite oncologists' crucial role in guiding cancer care, current literature is sparse with respect to the oncologists' views on value. Here, we evaluated oncologists perceptions of the use and measurement of value in cancer care.We conducted in-depth, open-ended interviews with 31 US oncologists practicing nationwide in various environments. Oncologists discussed the definition, measurement, and implementation of value. Transcripts were analyzed using matrix and thematic analysis.Oncologists' definitions of value varied greatly. Some described versions of the standard health economic definition of value, that is, cost relative to health outcomes. Many others did not include cost in their definition of value. Oncologists considered patient goals and quality of life as important components of value that they perceived were missing from current value measurement. Oncologists prioritized a patient-centric view of value over societal or other perspectives. Oncologists were inclined to consider the value of a treatment only if they perceived treatment would pose a financial burden to patients. Oncologists had differing opinions regarding who should be responsible for determining whether care is low value but generally felt this should remain within the purview of the oncology community.Oncologists agreed that cost was an important issue, but disagreed about whether cost was involved in value as well as the role of value in guiding treatment. Better clarity and alignment on the definition of and appropriate way to measure value is critical to the success of efforts to improve value in cancer care.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jval.2018.01.005

    View details for Web of Science ID 000441071700005

    View details for PubMedID 30098670

  • Effect of a Lay Health Worker Intervention on Goals-of-Care Documentation and on Health Care Use, Costs, and Satisfaction Among Patients With Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA oncology Patel, M. I., Sundaram, V., Desai, M., Periyakoil, V. S., Kahn, J. S., Bhattacharya, J., Asch, S. M., Milstein, A., Bundorf, M. K. 2018

    Abstract

    Importance: Although lay health workers (LHWs) improve cancer screening and treatment adherence, evidence on whether they can enhance other aspects of care is limited.Objective: To determine whether an LHW program can increase documentation of patients' care preferences after cancer diagnosis.Design, Setting, and Participants: Randomized clinical trial conducted from August 13, 2013, through February 2, 2015, among 213 patients with stage 3 or 4 or recurrent cancer at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System. Data analysis was by intention to treat and performed from January 15 to August 18, 2017.Interventions: Six-month program with an LHW trained to assist patients with establishing end-of-life care preferences vs usual care.Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was documentation of goals of care. Secondary outcomes were patient satisfaction on the Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems "satisfaction with provider" item (on a scale of 0 [worst] to 10 [best possible]), health care use, and costs.Results: Among the 213 participants randomized and included in the intention-to-treat analysis, the mean (SD) age was 69.3 (9.1) years, 211 (99.1%) were male, and 165 (77.5%) were of non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity. Within 6 months of enrollment, patients randomized to the intervention had greater documentation of goals of care than the control group (97 [92.4%] vs 19 [17.5%.]; P<.001) and larger increases in satisfaction with care on the Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems "satisfaction with provider" item (difference-in-difference, 1.53; 95% CI, 0.67-2.41; P<.001). The number of patients who died within 15 months of enrollment did not differ between groups (intervention, 60 of 105 [57.1%] vs control, 60 of 108 [55.6%]; P=.68). In the 30 days before death, patients in the intervention group had greater hospice use (46 [76.7%] vs 29 [48.3%]; P=.002), fewer emergency department visits (mean [SD], 0.05 [0.22] vs 0.60 [0.76]; P<.001), fewer hospitalizations (mean [SD], 0.05 [0.22] vs 0.50 [0.62]; P<.001), and lower costs (median [interquartile range], $1048 [$331-$8522] vs $23 482 [$9708-$55 648]; P<.001) than patients in the control group.Conclusions and Relevance: Incorporating an LHW into cancer care increases goals-of-care documentation and patient satisfaction and reduces health care use and costs at the end of life.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02966509.

    View details for DOI 10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.2446

    View details for PubMedID 30054634

  • Incidence of lung cancer histologic cell-types according to neighborhood factors: A population based study in California PLOS ONE DeRouen, M. C., Hu, L., McKinley, M., Gali, K., Patel, M., Clarke, C., Wakelee, H., Haile, R., Gomez, S., Cheng, I. 2018; 13 (5): e0197146

    Abstract

    The relationships between neighborhood factors (i.e., neighborhood socioeconomic status (nSES) and ethnic enclave) and histologic subtypes of lung cancer for racial/ethnic groups, particularly Hispanics and Asian American/Pacific Islanders (AAPIs), are poorly understood.We conducted a population-based study of 75,631 Californians diagnosed with lung cancer from 2008 through2012. We report incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for lung cancer histologic cell-types by nSES among racial/ethnic groups (non-Hispanic (NH) Whites, NH Blacks, Hispanics and AAPIs) and according to Hispanic or Asian neighborhood ethnic enclave status among Hispanics and AAPIs, respectively. In addition, we examined incidence jointly by nSES and ethnic enclave.Patterns of lung cancer incidence by nSES and ethnic enclave differed across race/ethnicity, sex, and histologic cell-type. For adenocarcinoma, Hispanic males and females, residing in both low nSES and high nSES neighborhoods that were low enclave, had higher incidence rates compared to those residing in low nSES, high enclave neighborhoods; males (IRR, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.04-1.32] and IRR, 1.15 [95% CI, 1.02-1.29], respectively) and females (IRR, 1.29 [95% CI, 1.15-1.44] and IRR, 1.51 [95% CI, 1.36-1.67], respectively). However, AAPI males residing in both low and high SES neighborhoods that were also low enclave had lower adenocarcinoma incidence.Neighborhood factors differentially influence the incidence of lung cancer histologic cell-types with heterogeneity in these associations by race/ethnicity and sex. For Hispanic males and females and AAPI males, neighborhood ethnic enclave status is strongly associated with lung adenocarcinoma incidence.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0197146

    View details for Web of Science ID 000433077000033

    View details for PubMedID 29791458

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5965814

  • Population-based differences in the outcome and presentation of lung cancer patients based upon racial, histologic, and economic factors in all lung patients and those with metastatic disease CANCER MEDICINE Varlotto, J., Voland, R., McKie, K., Flickinger, J. C., DeCamp, M. M., Maddox, D., Rava, P., Fitzgerald, T. J., Graeber, G., Rassaei, N., Oliveira, P., Ali, S., Belani, C., Glanzman, J., Wakelee, H. A., Patel, M., Baima, J., Zhang, J., Walsh, W. 2018; 7 (4): 1211–20

    Abstract

    To investigate the interrelation between economic, marital, and known histopathologic/therapeutic prognostic factors in presentation and survival of patients with lung cancer in nine different ethnic groups. A retrospective review of the SEER database was conducted through the years 2007-2012. Population differences were assessed via chi-square testing. Multivariable analyses (MVA) were used to detect overall survival (OS) differences in the total population (TP, N = 153,027) and for those patients presenting with Stage IV (N = 70,968). Compared to Whites, Blacks were more likely to present with younger age, male sex, lower income, no insurance, single/widowed partnership, less squamous cell carcinomas, and advanced stage; and experience less definitive surgery, lower OS, and lung cancer-specific (LCSS) survival. White Hispanics presented with younger age, higher income, lower rates of insurance, single/widowed partnership status, advanced stage, more adenocarcinomas, and lower rates of definitive surgery, but no difference in OS and LCSS than Whites. In the TP and Stage IV populations, MVAs revealed that OS was better or equivalent to Whites for all other ethnic groups and was positively associated with insurance, marriage, and higher income. Blacks presented with more advanced disease and were more likely to succumb to lung cancer, but when adjusted for prognostic factors, they had a better OS in the TP compared to Whites. Disparities in income, marital status, and insurance rather than race affect OS of patients with lung cancer. Because of their presentation with advanced disease, Black and Hispanics are likely to have increased benefit from lung cancer screening.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/cam4.1430

    View details for Web of Science ID 000430663300027

    View details for PubMedID 29533006

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5911616

  • Quality Of End-Of-Life Care Is Higher In The VA Compared To Care Paid For By Traditional Medicare HEALTH AFFAIRS Gidwani-Marszowski, R., Needleman, J., Mor, V., Faricy-Anderson, K., Boothroyd, D. B., Hsin, G., Wagner, T. H., Lorenz, K. A., Patel, M. I., Joyce, V. R., Murrell, S. S., Ramchandran, K., Asch, S. M. 2018; 37 (1): 95–103

    Abstract

    Congressional and Veterans Affairs (VA) leaders have recommended the VA become more of a purchaser than a provider of health care. Fee-for-service Medicare provides an example of how purchased care differs from the VA's directly provided care. Using established indicators of overly intensive end-of-life care, we compared the quality of care provided through the two systems to veterans dying of cancer in fiscal years 2010-14. The Medicare-reliant veterans were significantly more likely to receive high-intensity care, in the form of chemotherapy, hospital stays, admission to the intensive care unit, more days spent in the hospital, and death in the hospital. However, they were significantly less likely than VA-reliant patients to have multiple emergency department visits. Higher-intensity end-of-life care may be driven by financial incentives present in fee-for-service Medicare but not in the VA's integrated system. To avoid putting VA-reliant veterans at risk of receiving lower-quality care, VA care-purchasing programs should develop coordination and quality monitoring programs to guard against overly intensive end-of-life care.

    View details for DOI 10.1377/hlthaff.2017.0883

    View details for Web of Science ID 000419614900014

    View details for PubMedID 29309227

  • Real-world treatment patterns for patients receiving second-line and third-line treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer: A systematic review of recently published studies PLOS ONE Davies, J., Patel, M., Gridelli, C., De Marinis, F., Waterkamp, D., McCusker, M. E. 2017; 12 (4)

    Abstract

    Most patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have a poor prognosis and receive limited benefit from conventional treatments, especially in later lines of therapy. In recent years, several novel therapies have been approved for second- and third-line treatment of advanced NSCLC. In light of these approvals, it is valuable to understand the uptake of these new treatments in routine clinical practice and their impact on patient care. A systematic literature search was conducted in multiple scientific databases to identify observational cohort studies published between January 2010 and March 2017 that described second- or third-line treatment patterns and clinical outcomes in patients with advanced NSCLC. A qualitative data synthesis was performed because a meta-analysis was not possible due to the heterogeneity of the study populations. A total of 12 different study cohorts in 15 articles were identified. In these cohorts, single-agent chemotherapy was the most commonly administered treatment in both the second- and third-line settings. In the 5 studies that described survival from the time of second-line treatment initiation, median overall survival ranged from 4.6 months (95% CI, 3.8-5.7) to 12.8 months (95% CI, 10.7-14.5). There was limited information on the use of biomarker-directed therapy in these patient populations. This systematic literature review offers insights into the adoption of novel therapies into routine clinical practice for second- and third-line treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC. This information provides a valuable real-world context for the impact of recently approved treatments for advanced NSCLC.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0175679

    View details for Web of Science ID 000399955600034

    View details for PubMedID 28410405

  • The Appropriate Provision of Primary versus Specialist Palliative Care to Cancer Patients: Oncologists' Perspectives JOURNAL OF PALLIATIVE MEDICINE Gidwani, R., Nevedal, A., Patel, M., Blayney, D. W., Timko, C., Ramchandran, K., Kelly, P. A., Asch, S. M. 2017; 20 (4): 395-403

    Abstract

    Many cancer patients do not receive recommended palliative care (PC). Oncologists' perspectives about PC have not been adequately described qualitatively and may explain some of the gaps in the delivery of PC.To characterize U.S. oncologists' perceptions of: primary and specialist PC; experiences interacting with PC specialists; and the optimal interface of PC and oncology in providing PC.In-depth interviews with practicing oncologists.Oncologists working in: the general community, academic medical centers (AMC), and Veterans Health Administration.Semistructured telephone interviews with 31 oncologists analyzed using matrix and thematic approaches.Seven major themes emerged: PC was perceived as appropriate throughout the disease trajectory but due to resource constraints was largely provided at end of life; oncologists had three schools of thought on primary versus specialist PC; there was an under-availability of outpatient PC; poor communication about prognosis and care plans created tension between providers; PC was perceived as a "team of outsiders"; PC had too narrow a focus of care; and AMC-based PC evidence did not generalize to community practices. Oncologists noted three ways to improve the interface between oncologists and PC providers: a clear division of responsibility, in-person collaboration, and sharing of nonphysician palliative team members.Oncologists in our sample were supportive of PC, but they reported obstacles related to care coordination and inpatient PC. Inpatient PC posed some unique challenges with respect to conflicting prognoses and care practices that would be mitigated through the increased availability and use of outpatient PC.

    View details for DOI 10.1089/jpm.2016.0399

    View details for Web of Science ID 000398452000016

  • Redesigning Cancer Care Delivery: Views From Patients and Caregivers. Journal of oncology practice Patel, M. I., Periyakoil, V. S., Blayney, D. W., Moore, D., Nevedal, A., Asch, S., Milstein, A., Coker, T. R. 2017; 13 (4): e291-e302

    Abstract

    Cancer is a leading cause of death in the United States. Although treatments have improved, patients and caregivers continue to report significant gaps in their care. The objective of this study was to examine the views of patients and caregivers on their experiences with current cancer care delivery and identify key strategies to improve the delivery of care.Semistructured interviews were conducted with 75 patients and 45 caregivers across the United States. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparative method of qualitative analysis.Participants reported multiple gaps in care delivery, including barriers in health communication with health care providers, lack of elucidation of care goals, lack of care coordination, and challenges in accessing care. Participants identified that greater use of nonphysician providers and alternative formats, such as telephone-based care and home and community-based care, would narrow these gaps.Understanding patients' and caregivers' experiences with gaps in cancer care delivery can inform cancer care delivery redesign efforts and lead to targeted interventions that result in patient-centered and family-oriented care.

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JOP.2016.017327

    View details for PubMedID 28399387

  • Overview of Thoracic Oncology Trials in Cooperative Groups Around the Globe. Clinical lung cancer Salahudeen, A. A., Patel, M. I., Baas, P., Curran, W. J., Bradley, J. D., Gandara, D. R., Goss, G. D., Mok, T. S., Ramalingam, S. S., Vokes, E. E., Malik, S. M., Wakelee, H. A. 2017; 18 (1): 5-12

    Abstract

    Survival rates of patients with either early and advanced stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have improved with newer systemic therapy and radiation techniques, including combination regimens, targeted therapies, and immunotherapies. The cancer cooperative groups have historically played a critical role in the advancement of NSCLC therapy. Annually, representatives from cooperative groups worldwide convene at the International Lung Cancer Congress (ILCC). In summer 2015, the ILCC reached its 16th anniversary. This article highlights the NSCLC studies presented by participating groups in 2015.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cllc.2016.06.007

    View details for PubMedID 27473736

  • Delivering End-of-Life Cancer Care: Perspectives of Providers. The American journal of hospice & palliative care Patel, M. I., Periyakoil, V. S., Moore, D., Nevedal, A., Coker, T. R. 2017: 1049909117719879

    Abstract

    Persistent gaps in end-of-life cancer care delivery and growing associated expenditures remain imminent US public health issues. The objective of this study was to understand clinical providers' experiences delivering cancer care for patients at the end of life and their perspectives on potential solutions to improve quality of care.Semistructured interviews were conducted with 75 cancer care providers across the United States. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparative method of qualitative analysis.Providers identified 3 major cancer care delivery challenges including lack of time to educate patients and caregivers due to clinical volume and administrative burdens, ambiguity in determining both prognosis and timing of palliative care at the end-of-life, and lack of adequate systems to support non-face-to-face communication with patients. To address these challenges, providers endorsed several options for clinical practice redesign in their settings. These include use of a lay health worker to assist in addressing early advance care planning, proactive non-face-to-face communication with patients specifically regarding symptom management, and community and in-home delivery of cancer care services.Specific strategies for cancer care redesign endorsed by health-care providers may be used to create interventions that can more efficiently and effectively address gaps in end-of-life cancer care.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/1049909117719879

    View details for PubMedID 28691498

  • The Appropriate Provision of Primary Versus Specialist Palliative Care to Cancer Patients: Oncologists' Perspectives. Journal of palliative medicine Gidwani, R., Nevedal, A., Patel, M., Blayney, D. W., Timko, C., Ramchandran, K., Kelly, P. A., Asch, S. M. 2016

    Abstract

    Many cancer patients do not receive recommended palliative care (PC). Oncologists' perspectives about PC have not been adequately described qualitatively and may explain some of the gaps in the delivery of PC.To characterize U.S. oncologists' perceptions of: primary and specialist PC; experiences interacting with PC specialists; and the optimal interface of PC and oncology in providing PC.In-depth interviews with practicing oncologists.Oncologists working in: the general community, academic medical centers (AMC), and Veterans Health Administration.Semistructured telephone interviews with 31 oncologists analyzed using matrix and thematic approaches.Seven major themes emerged: PC was perceived as appropriate throughout the disease trajectory but due to resource constraints was largely provided at end of life; oncologists had three schools of thought on primary versus specialist PC; there was an under-availability of outpatient PC; poor communication about prognosis and care plans created tension between providers; PC was perceived as a "team of outsiders"; PC had too narrow a focus of care; and AMC-based PC evidence did not generalize to community practices. Oncologists noted three ways to improve the interface between oncologists and PC providers: a clear division of responsibility, in-person collaboration, and sharing of nonphysician palliative team members.Oncologists in our sample were supportive of PC, but they reported obstacles related to care coordination and inpatient PC. Inpatient PC posed some unique challenges with respect to conflicting prognoses and care practices that would be mitigated through the increased availability and use of outpatient PC.

    View details for DOI 10.1089/jpm.2016.0399

    View details for PubMedID 27997278

  • PS01.71: Patient-Driven Epidemiologic Assessment of ROS1-Fusion Driven Cancers: Topic: Medical Oncology. Journal of thoracic oncology Walia, G., Addario, B. J., Patel, M. 2016; 11 (11S): S315-?

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jtho.2016.09.106

    View details for PubMedID 27969538

  • PS01.79: Epidemiology and Characteristics of US Veterans with NSCLC Using US Veterans Affairs (VA) Database: Topic: Medical Oncology. Journal of thoracic oncology Patel, M. I., Parisi, M., Patel, M., Pelletier, C., Bennett, C. L., Georgantopoulos, P. 2016; 11 (11S): S320-S321

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jtho.2016.09.114

    View details for PubMedID 27969546

  • The Burden of Cancer in Asian Americans: A Report of National Mortality Trends by Asian Ethnicity CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION Thompson, C. A., Gomez, S. L., Hastings, K. G., Kapphahn, K., Yu, P., Shariff-Marco, S., Bhatt, A. S., Wakelee, H. A., Patel, M. I., Cullen, M. R., Palaniappan, L. P. 2016; 25 (10): 1371-1382

    Abstract

    Asian Americans (AA) are the fastest growing U.S. population, and when properly distinguished by their ethnic origins, exhibit substantial heterogeneity in socioeconomic status, health behaviors, and health outcomes. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, yet trends and current patterns in the mortality burden of cancer among AA ethnic groups have not been documented.We report age-adjusted rates, standardized mortality ratios, and modeled trends in cancer-related mortality in the following AA ethnicities: Asian Indians, Chinese, Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, and Vietnamese, from 2003 to 2011, with non-Hispanic whites (NHW) as the reference population.For most cancer sites, AAs had lower cancer mortality than NHWs; however, mortality patterns were heterogeneous across AA ethnicities. Stomach and liver cancer mortality was very high, particularly among Chinese, Koreans, and Vietnamese, for whom these two cancer types combined accounted for 15% to 25% of cancer deaths, but less than 5% of cancer deaths in NHWs. In AA women, lung cancer was a leading cause of death, but (unlike males and NHW females) rates did not decline over the study period.Ethnicity-specific analyses are critical to understanding the national burden of cancer among the heterogeneous AA population.Our findings highlight the need for disaggregated reporting of cancer statistics in AAs and warrant consideration of tailored screening programs for liver and gastric cancers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(10); 1371-82. ©2016 AACR.

    View details for DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0167

    View details for Web of Science ID 000385642800002

    View details for PubMedID 27694108

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5218595

  • Acceptance of Advance Directives and Palliative Care Referral for Veterans With Advanced Cancer: A Retrospective Analysis. The American journal of hospice & palliative care Patel, M. I., Bhattacharya, J., Asch, S. M., Kahn, J. 2016; 33 (8): 742-747

    Abstract

    To evaluate the documentation of advance directive (ADs) and physician orders for life-sustaining treatment (POLST) with acceptance of palliative care (PC) services referral among patients with cancer.We retrospectively reviewed veterans with advanced cancers at the Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System. Chi-square tests estimated AD and POLST documentation and referral to PC. Logistic regression models estimated the odds of AD and POLST documentation and PC referral.Two hundred and forty-six veterans were diagnosed with cancer. In all, 53% had a documented AD, 5% had a POLST, and 47% accepted referral to PC. The AD documentation was not associated with acceptance of PC.We found no association of AD documentation and PC referral. Future studies should evaluate other factors that influence referral to these services.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/1049909115595216

    View details for PubMedID 26169523

  • Scientific Achievements May Not Reach Everyone: Understanding Disparities in Acute Leukemia. Current hematologic malignancy reports Patel, M. I. 2016; 11 (4): 265-270

    Abstract

    Over the past decade, scientific advancements have resulted in improved survival from acute leukemia. Continued advancements are expected given the attention to precision medicine and the resulting growth in development and adoption of risk-stratified, personalized therapies. While precision medicine has great potential to improve acute leukemia outcomes, there remain significant barriers to ensuring equitable access to these technologies and receipt of these prescribed targeted, personalized therapies. Over the past 3 years, studies report persistent outcome disparities among patients from specific racial and ethnic backgrounds, insurance and socioeconomic status, and other socio-demographic factors after a diagnosis of acute leukemia. A few recent studies examine etiologies for acute leukemia disparities and highlight the importance of ensuring access and equitable delivery of scientific advancements. In the context of continued scientific progress, future strategies require thoughtfully considered improvements in the delivery of care that can overcome the current challenges our patients face.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s11899-016-0329-y

    View details for PubMedID 27209407

  • Gene by Environment Investigation of Incident Lung Cancer Risk in African-Americans. EBioMedicine David, S. P., Wang, A., Kapphahn, K., Hedlin, H., Desai, M., Henderson, M., Yang, L., Walsh, K. M., Schwartz, A. G., Wiencke, J. K., Spitz, M. R., Wenzlaff, A. S., Wrensch, M. R., Eaton, C. B., Furberg, H., Mark Brown, W., Goldstein, B. A., Assimes, T., Tang, H., Kooperberg, C. L., Quesenberry, C. P., Tindle, H., Patel, M. I., Amos, C. I., Bergen, A. W., Swan, G. E., Stefanick, M. L. 2016; 4: 153-161

    Abstract

    Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms linked to both smoking exposure and risk of lung cancer. The degree to which lung cancer risk is driven by increased smoking, genetics, or gene-environment interactions is not well understood.We analyzed associations between 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with smoking quantity and lung cancer in 7156 African-American females in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), then analyzed main effects of top nominally significant SNPs and interactions between SNPs, cigarettes per day (CPD) and pack-years for lung cancer in an independent, multi-center case-control study of African-American females and males (1078 lung cancer cases and 822 controls).Nine nominally significant SNPs for CPD in WHI were associated with incident lung cancer (corrected p-values from 0.027 to 6.09 × 10(- 5)). CPD was found to be a nominally significant effect modifier between SNP and lung cancer for six SNPs, including CHRNA5 rs2036527[A](betaSNP*CPD = - 0.017, p = 0.0061, corrected p = 0.054), which was associated with CPD in a previous genome-wide meta-analysis of African-Americans.These results suggest that chromosome 15q25.1 variants are robustly associated with CPD and lung cancer in African-Americans and that the allelic dose effect of these polymorphisms on lung cancer risk is most pronounced in lighter smokers.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ebiom.2016.01.002

    View details for PubMedID 26981579

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4776066

  • Racial and Ethnic Variations in Lung Cancer Incidence and Mortality: Results From the Women's Health Initiative. Journal of clinical oncology Patel, M. I., Wang, A., Kapphahn, K., Desai, M., Chlebowski, R. T., Simon, M. S., Bird, C. E., Corbie-Smith, G., Gomez, S. L., Adams-Campbell, L. L., Cote, M. L., Stefanick, M. L., Wakelee, H. A. 2016; 34 (4): 360-368

    Abstract

    This study aimed to evaluate racial/ethnic differences in lung cancer incidence and mortality in the Women's Health Initiative Study, a longitudinal prospective cohort evaluation of postmenopausal women recruited from 40 clinical centers.Lung cancer diagnoses were centrally adjudicated by pathology review. Baseline survey questionnaires collected sociodemographic and health information. Logistic regression models estimated incidence and mortality odds by race/ethnicity adjusted for age, education, calcium/vitamin D, body mass index, smoking (status, age at start, duration, and pack-years), alcohol, family history, oral contraceptive, hormones, physical activity, and diet.The cohort included 129,951 women--108,487 (83%) non-Hispanic white (NHW); 10,892 (8%) non-Hispanic black (NHB); 4,882 (4%) Hispanic; 3,696 (3%) Asian/Pacific Islander (API); 534 (< 1%) American Indian/Alaskan Native; and 1,994 (1%) other. In unadjusted models, Hispanics had 66% lower odds of lung cancer compared with NHW (odds ratio [OR], 0.34; 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.5), followed by API (OR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.27 to 0.75) and NHB (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.95). In fully adjusted multivariable models, the decreased lung cancer risk for Hispanic compared with NHW women attenuated to the null (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.99). In unadjusted models Hispanic and API women had decreased risk of death compared with NHW women (OR, 0.30 [95% CI, 0.15 to 0.62] and 0.34 [95% CI, 0.16 to 0.75, respectively); however, no racial/ethnic differences were found in risk of lung cancer death in fully adjusted models.Differences in lung cancer incidence and mortality are associated with sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral factors. These findings suggest modifiable exposures and behaviors may contribute to differences in incidence of and mortality by race/ethnicity for postmenopausal women. Interventions focused on these factors may reduce racial/ethnic differences in lung cancer incidence and mortality.

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JCO.2015.63.5789

    View details for PubMedID 26700122

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4872034

  • Reply to M.H. Kanter et al. Journal of clinical oncology Rhoads, K. F., Patel, M. I., Ma, Y., Schmidt, L. A. 2015; 33 (30): 3519-?

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JCO.2015.62.5640

    View details for PubMedID 26215958

  • Incidence Trends of Lung Cancer by Immigration Status among Chinese Americans CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION Gomez, S. L., Yang, J., Lin, S., McCusker, M., Sandler, A., Cheng, I., Wakelee, H. A., Patel, M., Clarke, C. A. 2015; 24 (8): 1157-1164

    Abstract

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death among Chinese Americans. A detailed examination of incidence trends by immigration status and histology may inform the etiology of lung cancer in this growing population.California Cancer Registry data were enhanced with data on patient nativity. Lung cancer incidence rates for Chinese males and females were computed for the years 1990-2010, and rates by immigration status and histology were computed for 1990-2004. Trends were assessed with annual percentage change (APC) statistics (two-sided P values) based on linear regression.A total of 8,167 lung cancers were diagnosed among California Chinese from 1990 to 2010. Overall incidence increased nonstatistically among U.S.-born males (APC, 2.1; 95% CI, -4.9 to 9.7), but decreased significantly among foreign-born (APC, -1.7; 95% CI, -2.9 to -0.6). Statistically significant decreasing trends were observed for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), specifically the squamous cell and large cell carcinoma subtypes among foreign-born males. Among females, incidence decreased nonsignificantly among U.S.-born (APC, -2.8; 95% CI, -9.1 to 4.0) but was stable among foreign-born (APC, -0.4; 95% CI, -1.7 to 1.0). A statistically significant decreasing trend was observed for squamous cell among foreign-born females.These data provide critical evidence base to inform screening, research, and public health priorities in this growing population.Given the low smoking prevalence among Chinese Americans, especially females, and few known lung cancer risk factors in U.S. never-smoker populations, additional research of etiologic genetic or biologic factors may elucidate knowledge regarding lung cancer diagnosed in never smokers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 24(8); 1157-64. ©2015 AACR.

    View details for DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0123

    View details for Web of Science ID 000359320500002

    View details for PubMedID 25990553

  • Redesigning Advanced Cancer Care Delivery: Three Ways to Create Higher Value Cancer Care. Journal of oncology practice / American Society of Clinical Oncology Patel, M. I., Moore, D., Milstein, A. 2015; 11 (4): 280-284

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JOP.2014.001065

    View details for PubMedID 25991638

  • Detecting unplanned care from clinician notes in electronic health records. Journal of oncology practice / American Society of Clinical Oncology Tamang, S., Patel, M. I., Blayney, D. W., Kuznetsov, J., Finlayson, S. G., Vetteth, Y., Shah, N. 2015; 11 (3): e313-9

    Abstract

    Reduction in unplanned episodes of care, such as emergency department visits and unplanned hospitalizations, are important quality outcome measures. However, many events are only documented in free-text clinician notes and are labor intensive to detect by manual medical record review.We studied 308,096 free-text machine-readable documents linked to individual entries in our electronic health records, representing care for patients with breast, GI, or thoracic cancer, whose treatment was initiated at one academic medical center, Stanford Health Care (SHC). Using a clinical text-mining tool, we detected unplanned episodes documented in clinician notes (for non-SHC visits) or in coded encounter data for SHC-delivered care and the most frequent symptoms documented in emergency department (ED) notes.Combined reporting increased the identification of patients with one or more unplanned care visits by 32% (15% using coded data; 20% using all the data) among patients with 3 months of follow-up and by 21% (23% using coded data; 28% using all the data) among those with 1 year of follow-up. Based on the textual analysis of SHC ED notes, pain (75%), followed by nausea (54%), vomiting (47%), infection (36%), fever (28%), and anemia (27%), were the most frequent symptoms mentioned. Pain, nausea, and vomiting co-occur in 35% of all ED encounter notes.The text-mining methods we describe can be applied to automatically review free-text clinician notes to detect unplanned episodes of care mentioned in these notes. These methods have broad application for quality improvement efforts in which events of interest occur outside of a network that allows for patient data sharing.

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JOP.2014.002741

    View details for PubMedID 25980019

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4438112

  • Age and Genetics How Do Prognostic Factors at Diagnosis Explain Disparities in Acute Myeloid Leukemia? AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY-CANCER CLINICAL TRIALS Patel, M. I., Ma, Y., Mitchell, B. S., Rhoads, K. F. 2015; 38 (2): 159-164

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES:: Survival disparities in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) among blacks and Hispanics have been described but not studied extensively in adults. Although younger age and cytogenetic profiles of t(8;21) and acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) subtypes of AML are associated with improved survival, these factors have not been investigated by race. The purpose is to evaluate whether the observed survival differences for blacks and Hispanics with AML are attributable to older age at diagnosis or lower rates of favorable cytogenetic profiles at diagnosis. The hypothesis is that survival disparities for blacks and Hispanics with AML will be explained by older age at diagnosis and lower rates of favorable cytogenetics. METHODS:: Patients with AML were identified in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database (1999 to 2008). Kaplan-Meier (KM) survival curves predicted survival by race/ethnicity, stratified by age. Cox proportional hazard models estimated mortality by race with adjustment for age, sex, year of diagnosis, t(8;21), and APL subtypes. RESULTS:: A total of 25,692 patients were included. Blacks and Hispanics were diagnosed at younger ages (younger than 61 y), and had higher rates of t(8;21) and APL compared with non-Hispanic whites (NHWs). The overall KM curve shows that NHWs had a worse survival compared with other races/ethnicities. However, when KM curves were stratified by age, blacks and Hispanics had worse survival in younger age categories (younger than 61 y). In multivariable models, black race was associated with an increased risk of death compared with NHWs (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04-1.16). Adjustment for t(8;21) and APL subtypes did not attenuate the disparity. CONCLUSIONS:: Despite younger age and higher prevalence of favorable cytogenetics at diagnosis, blacks and Hispanics have an increased mortality from AML compared with other racial/ethnic groups. Future studies should investigate other factors that may influence outcomes among minority populations.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/COC.0b013e31828d7536

    View details for Web of Science ID 000351770500007

    View details for PubMedID 23608826

  • US lung cancer trends by histologic type. Cancer Patel, M. I., Cheng, I., Gomez, S. L. 2015; 121 (7): 1150-1152

    View details for DOI 10.1002/cncr.29180

    View details for PubMedID 25470142

  • How do integrated health care systems address racial and ethnic disparities in colon cancer? Journal of clinical oncology Rhoads, K. F., Patel, M. I., Ma, Y., Schmidt, L. A. 2015; 33 (8): 854-860

    Abstract

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) disparities have persisted over the last two decades. CRC is a complex disease requiring multidisciplinary care from specialists who may be geographically separated. Few studies have assessed the association between integrated health care system (IHS) CRC care quality, survival, and disparities. The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to an IHS positively affects quality of care, risk of mortality, and disparities.This retrospective secondary-data analysis study, using the California Cancer Registry linked to state discharge abstracts of patients treated for colon cancer (2001 to 2006), compared the rates of National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline-based care, the hazard of mortality, and racial/ethnic disparities in an IHS versus other settings.More than 30,000 patient records were evaluated. The IHS had overall higher rates of adherence to NCCN guidelines. Propensity score-matched Cox models showed an independent and protective association between care in the IHS and survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.87; 95% CI, 0.85 to 0.90). This advantage persisted across stage groups. Black race was associated with increased hazard of mortality in all other settings (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.27); however, there was no disparity within the IHS for any minority group (P > .11 for all groups) when compared with white race.The IHS delivered higher rates of evidence-based care and was associated with lower 5-year mortality. Racial/ethnic disparities in survival were absent in the IHS. Integrated systems may serve as the cornerstone for developing accountable care organizations poised to improve cancer outcomes and eliminate disparities under health care reform.

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JCO.2014.56.8642

    View details for PubMedID 25624437

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4348634

  • How do integrated health care systems address racial and ethnic disparities in colon cancer? Journal of clinical oncology Rhoads, K. F., Patel, M. I., Ma, Y., Schmidt, L. A. 2015; 33 (8): 854-860

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JCO.2014.56.8642

    View details for PubMedID 25624437

  • How do differences in treatment impact racial and ethnic disparities in acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Patel, M. I., Ma, Y., Mitchell, B., Rhoads, K. F. 2015; 24 (2): 344-349

    Abstract

    We previously demonstrated disparate acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) survival for black and Hispanic patients; these differences persisted despite younger ages and higher prevalence of favorable cytogenetics in these groups. This study determined: (i) whether there are differences in treatment delivered to minorities, and (ii) how these differences affect outcomes in AML. We hypothesize that differences in treatment explain some proportion of survival disparities.We used California Cancer Registry data linked to hospital discharge abstracts for patients with AML (1998-2008). Logistic regression models estimated odds of treatment (chemotherapy and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplant) by race/ethnicity. Cox proportional hazard models estimated mortality by race after adjustment for treatment.We analyzed 11,084 records. Black race was associated with lower odds of chemotherapy [OR, 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.61-0.91]. Black and Hispanic patients had decreased odds of transplant [(OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.46-0.87); (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.62-0.89), respectively]. Black patients had increased hazard of mortality (HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.25) compared with whites. Adjustment for receipt of any treatment resulted in decreased mortality (HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.00-1.20) for black patients.AML treatment differences for black patients explain some proportion of the disparity. Future AML disparities studies should investigate socioeconomic and other characteristics.Study findings may better elucidate drivers of disparities in AML. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 24(2); 344-9. ©2015 AACR.

    View details for DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0963

    View details for PubMedID 25662426

  • Are Patients With Thoracic Malignancies at Risk for Uncontrolled Symptoms? Journal of oncology practice / American Society of Clinical Oncology Patel, M. I., Williams, D. C., Wohlforth, C., Fisher, G., Wakelee, H. A., Blayney, D. W. 2015; 11 (1): e98-e102

    Abstract

    Patients with cancer often develop symptoms and contact their oncologists and care teams after normal clinic operating hours. Better understanding of these after-hours telephone calls can inform efforts to improve cancer care and to reduce health care spending. We sought to evaluate after-hours calls at Stanford Cancer Institute (SCI) Thoracic Oncology Clinic.We retrospectively analyzed content of telephone call notes made to SCI during weekends and from 5 pm to 8 am on weekdays. Chief complaint, caller and patient demographics, patient diagnosis, advice given, and disposition were analyzed. χ(2) tests were used to analyze differences in proportions.There were a total of 263 after-hours telephone calls during the 6 months of the study. After exclusions, there were 241 telephone calls for analysis. The majority of calls occurred between 5 pm to 11 pm (n = 175 [73%]; P < .001), followed by daytime calls on weekends (n = 157 [65%]; P < .001). Common symptoms were cough (28%) and dyspnea (27%). Of the calls, 62% (150 patients) resulted in emergency department (ED) referral, and 77% of patients (115 of 150) evaluated in the ED were admitted to the hospital.Most after-hours telephone calls from patients with lung cancer are related to symptoms. Many patients were referred to the ED and subsequently required hospitalization. Analysis of call content and prior events leading to after-hours calls may predict hospital admissions in this group of patients and can inform development of proactive interventions to improve quality of care and patient-centered outcomes.

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JOP.2014.001502

    View details for PubMedID 25271246

  • Integrated health systems and evidence-based care: standardizing treatment to eliminate cancer disparities. Future oncology Patel, M. I., Rhoads, K. F. 2015; 11 (12): 1715-1718

    View details for DOI 10.2217/fon.15.90

    View details for PubMedID 26075439

  • Lung Cancer Incidence Trends by Histology Type among Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Populations in the United States, 1990-2010 CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY BIOMARKERS & PREVENTION Cheng, I., Le, G. M., Noone, A., Gali, K., Patel, M., Haile, R. W., Wakelee, H. A., Gomez, S. L. 2014; 23 (11): 2250-2265

    Abstract

    Lung cancer is one of the leading cancer sites diagnosed among Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Native Hawaiians (AANHPI). To better understand the patterns of lung cancer incidence among AANHPIs, we examined the incidence trends of five histologic cell types of lung cancer across ten AANHPI populations in comparison with non-Hispanic Whites.Lung cancer incidence data from 1990 through 2010 were obtained from 13 U.S. population-based cancer registries. Age-adjusted histologic cell-type-specific incidence rates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Joinpoint regression models and annual percentage change (APC) statistics were used to characterize the magnitude and direction of trends.From 1990 through 2010, incidence rates of adenocarcinoma increased significantly for Filipino and Korean women with a 2.6% and 3.0% annual percentage increase, respectively. More recently, a significant rise in the incidence of adenocarcinoma was observed for Chinese men (1996-2010; APC = 1.3%). Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) increased 2.4% per year among Japanese women. For SCC, small cell lung carcinoma, large cell and other specified carcinoma, and unspecified types, stable or decreasing trends were observed in most AANHPI groups and non-Hispanic Whites.AANHPIs demonstrate a range in the burden of lung cancer across histologies and specific populations.These findings illustrate the importance of disaggregating AANHPIs into their specific populations. The rise in incidence of adenocarcinoma and SCC among certain AANHPIs demonstrates the need for research into non-tobacco associated risk factors for these populations and targeted efforts for tobacco prevention.

    View details for DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0493

    View details for Web of Science ID 000345279600007

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5738466

  • Transforming cancer care: are transdisciplinary approaches using design-thinking, engineering, and business methodologies needed to improve value in cancer care delivery? Journal of oncology practice / American Society of Clinical Oncology Patel, M. I., Moore, D., Blayney, D. W., Milstein, A. 2014; 10 (2): e51-4

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JOP.2013.000928

    View details for PubMedID 24371302

  • How do social factors explain outcomes in non-small-cell lung cancer among Hispanics in California? Explaining the Hispanic paradox. Journal of clinical oncology Patel, M. I., Schupp, C. W., Gomez, S. L., Chang, E. T., Wakelee, H. A. 2013; 31 (28): 3572-3578

    Abstract

    Hispanics in the United States have lower age-adjusted mortality resulting from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with non-Hispanic whites (NHWs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate individual, clinical, and neighborhood factors in survival among Hispanics with NSCLC.We performed a retrospective analysis of NHWs and Hispanics with NSCLC between 1998 and 2007 in the California Cancer Registry (follow-up to December 2009). Kaplan-Meier curves depict survival by nativity for Hispanics with NSCLC. Cox proportional hazards models estimated hazard of mortality by race with adjustment for individual (age, sex, marital status), clinical (histologic grade, surgery, irradiation, chemotherapy), and neighborhood factors (neighborhood socioeconomic status, ethnic enclave).We included 14,280 Hispanic patients with NSCLC. Foreign-born Hispanics had 15% decreased risk of disease-specific mortality resulting from NSCLC compared with NHWs (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.88) after adjustment for individual, clinical, and neighborhood factors. After adjustment for individual factors, compared with US-born Hispanics, foreign-born Hispanics had 10% decreased risk of disease-specific mortality (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.96). Clinical and neighborhood factors slightly moderated the survival benefit for foreign-born patients. A modestly more pronounced survival advantage was seen for foreign-born Hispanics living in low socioeconomic and high Hispanic enclave neighborhoods as compared with US-born Hispanics (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.90).Foreign-born Hispanics with NSCLC have a decreased risk of disease-specific mortality compared with NHWs and US-born Hispanics with NSCLC. Neighborhood factors slightly moderate this survival advantage. This survival advantage is slightly more pronounced in lower socioeconomic and higher Hispanic enclave neighborhoods.

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JCO.2012.48.6217

    View details for PubMedID 23960183

  • How do social factors explain outcomes in non-small-cell lung cancer among hispanics in california? Explaining the Hispanic paradox. Journal of clinical oncology Patel, M. I., Schupp, C. W., Gomez, S. L., Chang, E. T., Wakelee, H. A. 2013; 31 (28): 3572-3578

    Abstract

    Hispanics in the United States have lower age-adjusted mortality resulting from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with non-Hispanic whites (NHWs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate individual, clinical, and neighborhood factors in survival among Hispanics with NSCLC.We performed a retrospective analysis of NHWs and Hispanics with NSCLC between 1998 and 2007 in the California Cancer Registry (follow-up to December 2009). Kaplan-Meier curves depict survival by nativity for Hispanics with NSCLC. Cox proportional hazards models estimated hazard of mortality by race with adjustment for individual (age, sex, marital status), clinical (histologic grade, surgery, irradiation, chemotherapy), and neighborhood factors (neighborhood socioeconomic status, ethnic enclave).We included 14,280 Hispanic patients with NSCLC. Foreign-born Hispanics had 15% decreased risk of disease-specific mortality resulting from NSCLC compared with NHWs (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.88) after adjustment for individual, clinical, and neighborhood factors. After adjustment for individual factors, compared with US-born Hispanics, foreign-born Hispanics had 10% decreased risk of disease-specific mortality (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.96). Clinical and neighborhood factors slightly moderated the survival benefit for foreign-born patients. A modestly more pronounced survival advantage was seen for foreign-born Hispanics living in low socioeconomic and high Hispanic enclave neighborhoods as compared with US-born Hispanics (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.90).Foreign-born Hispanics with NSCLC have a decreased risk of disease-specific mortality compared with NHWs and US-born Hispanics with NSCLC. Neighborhood factors slightly moderate this survival advantage. This survival advantage is slightly more pronounced in lower socioeconomic and higher Hispanic enclave neighborhoods.

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JCO.2012.48.6217

    View details for PubMedID 23960183

  • Seventh Edition (2010) of the AJCC/UICC Staging System for Gastric Adenocarcinoma: Is there Room for Improvement? ANNALS OF SURGICAL ONCOLOGY Patel, M. I., Rhoads, K. F., Ma, Y., Ford, J. M., Visser, B. C., Kunz, P. L., Fisher, G. A., Chang, D. T., Koong, A., Norton, J. A., Poultsides, G. A. 2013; 20 (5): 1631-1638

    Abstract

    The gastric cancer AJCC/UICC staging system recently underwent significant revisions, but studies on Asian patients have reported a lack of adequate discrimination between various consecutive stages. We sought to validate the new system on a U.S. population database.California Cancer Registry data linked to the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development discharge abstracts were used to identify patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (esophagogastric junction and gastric cardia tumors excluded) who underwent curative-intent surgical resection in California from 2002 to 2006. AJCC/UICC stage was recalculated based on the latest seventh edition. Overall survival probabilities were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method.Of 1905 patients analyzed, 54 % were males with a median age of 70 years. Median number of pathologically examined lymph nodes was 12 (range, 1-90); 40 % of patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, and 31 % received adjuvant radiotherapy. The seventh edition AJCC/UICC system did not distinguish outcome adequately between stages IB and IIA (P = 0.40), or IIB and IIIA (P = 0.34). By merging stage II into 1 category and moving T2N1 to stage IB and T2N2, T1N3 to stage IIIA, we propose a new grouping system with improved discriminatory abilityIn this first study validating the new seventh edition AJCC/UICC staging system for gastric cancer on a U.S. population with a relatively limited number of lymph nodes examined, we found stages IB and IIA, as well as IIB and IIIA to perform similarly. We propose a revised stage grouping for the AJCC/UICC staging system that better discriminates between outcomes.

    View details for DOI 10.1245/s10434-012-2724-5

    View details for Web of Science ID 000317308200032

    View details for PubMedID 23149854

  • The influence of Hispanic ethnicity on nonsmall cell lung cancer histology and patient survival An Analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Database CANCER Gomez, S. L., Schupp, C. W., Patel, M. 2013; 119 (6): 1286-1287

    View details for DOI 10.1002/cncr.27799

    View details for Web of Science ID 000315696600027

    View details for PubMedID 23027432

  • Understanding disparities in leukemia: a national study CANCER CAUSES & CONTROL Patel, M. I., Ma, Y., Mitchell, B. S., Rhoads, K. F. 2012; 23 (11): 1831-1837

    Abstract

    Disparities in solid tumors have been well studied. However, disparities in hematologic malignancies have been relatively unexplored on population-based levels. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between race/ethnicity and acute leukemia mortality.All patients with acute leukemia [acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)] were identified in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database, 1999-2008. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated to reflect survival probabilities by race/ethnicity. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models estimated hazard of mortality by race with adjustment for individual (age, gender, year of diagnosis) and select genetic factors.A total of 39,002 patients with acute leukemia were included in the study. Overall, there was a mortality disparity in acute leukemia for blacks (HR 1.17, p < 0.0001) and Hispanics (HR 1.13, p < 0.0001) compared with non-Hispanic whites. In stratified analysis, disparities in ALL were greater than AML; blacks (HR[ALL]1.45, p < 0.0001; HR[AML]1.12, p < 0.0011); Hispanics (HR[ALL]1.46, p < 0.0001; HR[AML]1.06, p < 0.0001). Adjustment for individual patient and select genetic factors did not explain disparities.Blacks and Hispanics suffer decreased survival in acute leukemia as compared to others. Further investigation is needed to understand the drivers of poor cancer outcomes in these populations.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10552-012-0062-3

    View details for Web of Science ID 000309671300009

    View details for PubMedID 22971999

  • Adjuvant chemotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Frontiers in oncology Patel, M. I., Wakelee, H. A. 2011; 1: 45-?

    Abstract

    For many years adjuvant chemotherapy has been a standard treatment after complete resection in malignancies such as breast and colon but only recently has its use become standard in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although surgery is regarded as the best possible treatment for early stage NSCLC, only 20-25% of patients have resectable disease at presentation. Despite optimal surgical treatment, 5-year survival rates for NSCLC remain 50-60% for stage IB, 40-50% for stage II, and 20-30% for stage III (Kohler et al., 2011; Siegel et al., 2011). Adjuvant chemotherapy provides additional survival benefit in resected NSCLC but questions remain as to how to select patients for therapy and which regimen is best. Other than work with tegafur/uracil in Japan, the positive adjuvant trials have all utilized a cisplatin backbone, but the drug(s) to pair with cisplatin are a matter of debate and will be discussed further in this manuscript.

    View details for DOI 10.3389/fonc.2011.00045

    View details for PubMedID 22655247

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC3356017