Bio


Maya Adam MD has been teaching at Stanford University since 2009. She received her BA in Human Biology from Stanford before studying medicine at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Prior to her post-secondary studies, she spent 10 years as a professional ballet dancer with the State Theater of Saxony in Germany.
At the Stanford School of Medicine, Adam creates online educational content for the Re-imagining Medical Education Project, led by Charles Prober MD, Senior Associate Dean for Medical Education. In the Program in Human Biology, Adam teaches courses on child health and nutrition. In 2013, Adam created the free, massive open online course Stanford Child Nutrition and Cooking, a public health education outreach effort that has reached more than 300,000 international students. She is also the founder of a non-profit organization called Just Cook for Kids. In 2014, Adam started applying the new teaching technologies being developed at Stanford to the creation of digital teaching tools designed to support the work of international community health workers. The resulting Stanford Health Outreach App is now being used by community health organizations in South Africa and Guatemala and the teaching videos associated with the app have been translated into Xhosa, Spanish and Hindi. In 2015 Adam created the online CME course Food and Medicine and the parallel open online course, Food and Health. She is the author of Food Love Family: A Practical Guide to Child Nutrition.

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Founder, Just Cook for Kids (2013 - Present)

Community and International Work


  • Stanford Health Outreach App, South Africa

    Topic

    Community Health Promotion

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Philani Maternal and Child Health Clinic

    Populations Served

    Women and children in under-resourced areas

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

All Publications


  • The Use of Short, Animated, Patient-Centered Springboard Videos to Underscore the Clinical Relevance of Preclinical Medical Student Education. Academic medicine Adam, M., Chen, S. F., Amieva, M., Deitz, J., Jang, H., Porwal, A., Prober, C. 2017

    Abstract

    Medical students often struggle to appreciate the clinical relevance of material taught in the preclinical years. The authors believe videos could be effectively used to interweave a patient's illness script with foundational basic science concepts.In collaboration with four other U.S. medical schools, educators at the Stanford University School of Medicine created 36 short, animated, patient-centered springboard videos (third-person, narrated accounts of authentic patient cases conveying foundational pathophysiology) in 2014. The videos were used to introduce students to 36 content modules, created as part of a microbiology, immunology, and infectious diseases curriculum. The videos were created with input from faculty content experts and in some cases medical students, and were piloted using a flipped classroom pedagogical approach in January 2015-June 2016.Student feedback from course evaluations and focus groups was analyzed using a mixed-methods approach. On the course evaluations, the majority of students rated the patient-centered videos positively, and the majority of comments on the videos were positive, highlighting both enhanced engagement and enhanced learning and retention. Comments from focus groups mirrored the course evaluation comments and highlighted different usage patterns for the videos.The authors will continue to gather and analyze data from schools using the videos as part of their core preclinical curriculum, and will produce similar videos for use in other areas of undergraduate medical education. These videos could support students' review of content taught previously and be repurposed for use in continuing and graduate medical education, as well as patient education.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/ACM.0000000000001574

    View details for PubMedID 28121656

  • Massive open online nutrition and cooking course for improved eating behaviors and meal composition. international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity Adam, M., Young-Wolff, K. C., Konar, E., Winkleby, M. 2015; 12 (1): 143-?

    View details for DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0305-2

    View details for PubMedID 26630879