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  • Impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on surgical practice - Part 2 (surgical prioritisation). International journal of surgery (London, England) Al-Jabir, A., Kerwan, A., Nicola, M., Alsafi, Z., Khan, M., Sohrabi, C., O'Neill, N., Iosifidis, C., Griffin, M., Mathew, G., Agha, R. 2020

    Abstract

    The Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic represents a once in a century challenge to human healthcare with 2.4 million cases and 165,000 deaths thus far. Surgical practice has been significantly impacted with all specialties writing guidelines for how to manage during this crisis. All specialties have had to triage the urgency of their daily surgical procedures and consider non-surgical management options where possible. The Pandemic has had ramifications for ways of working, surgical techniques, open vs minimally invasive, theatre workflow, patient and staff safety, training and education. With guidelines specific to each specialty being implemented and followed, surgeons should be able to continue to provide safe and effective care to their patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this comprehensive and up to date review we assess changes to working practices through the lens of each surgical specialty.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijsu.2020.05.002

    View details for PubMedID 32413502

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7217115

  • Impact of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on surgical practice - Part 1 (Review Article). International journal of surgery (London, England) Al-Jabir, A., Kerwan, A., Nicola, M., Alsafi, Z., Khan, M., Sohrabi, C., O'Neill, N., Iosifidis, C., Griffin, M., Mathew, G., Agha, R. 2020

    Abstract

    The Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in over 2.3 million confirmed cases and over 160,000 deaths. The impact of COVID-19 on surgical practice is widespread ranging from workforce and staffing issues, procedural prioritisation, viral transmission risk intraoperatively, changes to perioperative practice and ways of working alongside the impact on surgical education and training. Whilst there has been a growing literature base describing the early clinical course of COVID-19 and on aspects of critical care related to treating these patients, there has been a dearth of evidence on how this pandemic will affect surgical practice. This paper seeks to review the current evidence and offers recommendations for changes to surgical practice to minimise the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijsu.2020.05.022

    View details for PubMedID 32407799

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7214340

  • The regenerative role of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) in plastic and reconstructive surgery INTERNATIONAL WOUND JOURNAL Naderi, N., Combellack, E. J., Griffin, M., Sedaghati, T., Javed, M., Findlay, M. W., Wallace, C. G., Mosahebi, A., Butler, P. E., Seifalian, A. M., Whitaker, I. S. 2017; 14 (1): 112-124

    Abstract

    The potential use of stem cell-based therapies for the repair and regeneration of various tissues and organs offers a paradigm shift in plastic and reconstructive surgery. The use of either embryonic stem cells (ESC) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) in clinical situations is limited because of regulations and ethical considerations even though these cells are theoretically highly beneficial. Adult mesenchymal stem cells appear to be an ideal stem cell population for practical regenerative medicine. Among these cells, adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) have the potential to differentiate the mesenchymal, ectodermal and endodermal lineages and are easy to harvest. Additionally, adipose tissue yields a high number of ADSC per volume of tissue. Based on this background knowledge, the purpose of this review is to summarise and describe the proliferation and differentiation capacities of ADSC together with current preclinical data regarding the use of ADSC as regenerative tools in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/iwj.12569

    View details for Web of Science ID 000392919100017

    View details for PubMedID 26833722