Academic Appointments


Clinical Trials


  • A Safety and Efficacy Study Evaluating CTX130 in Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory T or B Cell Malignancies (COBALT-LYM) Recruiting

    This is a single-arm, open-label, multicenter, Phase 1 study evaluating the safety and efficacy of CTX130 in subjects with relapsed or refractory T or B cell malignancies.

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  • Convalescent Plasma in Outpatients With COVID-19 Not Recruiting

    The overarching goal of this project is to confirm or refute the role of passive immunization as a safe and efficacious therapy in preventing the progression from mild to severe/critical COVID-19 illness and to understand the immunologic kinetics of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies after passive immunization.The primary objective is to determine the efficacy and safety of a single dose of convalescent plasma (CP) for preventing the progression from mild to severe COVID-19 illness. The secondary objective is to characterize the immunologic response to CP administration. This study will enroll adults presenting to the emergency department (ED) with mild, symptomatic, laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 illness, who are at high risk for progression to severe/critical illness, but who are clinically stable for outpatient management at randomization.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial.

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All Publications


  • Nursing Workflow Change in a COVID-19 Inpatient Unit Following the Deployment of Inpatient Telehealth: An Observational Study Using a Real-Time Locating System. Journal of medical Internet research Vilendrer, S., Lough, M. E., Garvert, D. W., Lambert, M. H., Lu, J. H., Patel, B., Shah, N. H., Williams, M. Y., Kling, S. M. 2022

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic prompted widespread implementation of telehealth, including in the inpatient setting with the goals to reduce potential pathogen exposure events and personal protective equipment (PPE) utilization. Nursing workflow adaptations in these novel environments is of particular interest given the association between nursing time at the bedside and patient safety. Understanding the frequency and duration of nurse-patient encounters following the introduction of a novel telehealth platform in the context of COVID-19 may therefore provide insight into downstream impacts on patient safety, pathogen exposure, and PPE utilization.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate changes in nursing workflow relative to pre-pandemic levels using real-time locating system (RTLS) following the deployment of inpatient telehealth on a COVID-19 unit.METHODS: In March 2020, telehealth was installed in patient rooms in a COVID-19 unit and on movable carts in 3 comparison units. Existing RTLS captured nurse movement during 1 pre- and 5 post-pandemic stages (January-December 2020). Change in direct nurse-patient encounters, time spent in patient rooms per encounter, and total time spent with patients per shift relative to baseline were calculated. Generalized linear models assessed difference-in-differences in outcomes between COVID-19 and comparison units. Telehealth adoption was captured and reported at the unit level.RESULTS: Change in frequency of encounters and time spent per encounter from baseline differed between the COVID-19 and comparison units at all stages of the pandemic (all P's<0.0001). Frequency of encounters decreased (difference-in-differences range: -6.6 to -14.1 encounters) and duration of encounters increased (difference-in-differences range: 1.8 to 6.2 minutes) from baseline to a greater extent in the COVID-19 units compared to the comparison units. At most stages of the pandemic, the change in total time nurses spent in patient rooms per patient per shift from baseline did not differ between the COVID-19 and comparison units (p's>0.17). The primary COVID-19 unit quickly adopted telehealth technology during the observation period, initiating 15,088 encounters that averaged 6.6 minutes (standard deviation = 13.6) each.CONCLUSIONS: RTLS movement data suggests total nursing time at the bedside remained unchanged following the deployment of inpatient telehealth in a COVID-19 unit. Compared to other units with shared mobile telehealth units, frequency of nurse-patient in-person encounters decreased and duration lengthened on a COVID-19 unit with in-room telehealth availability, indicating "batched" redistribution of work to maintain total time at bedside relative to pre-pandemic periods. The simultaneous adoption of telehealth suggests virtual care was a complement to, rather than a replacement for, in-person care. Study limitations, however, preclude our ability to draw a causal link between nursing workflow change and telehealth adoption, and further evaluation is needed to determine potential downstream implications on disease transmission, PPE utilization, and patient safety.CLINICALTRIAL:

    View details for DOI 10.2196/36882

    View details for PubMedID 35635840