Professional Education


  • Master of Science, Stanford University, BIOL-MS (2006)
  • Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, WesternUnivHealthSci (2010)
  • Bachelor of Arts, Stanford University, HUMBI-BA (2006)

Stanford Advisors


Journal Articles


  • Echocardiographic and Electrocardiographic Characteristics of Male and Female Squirrel Monkeys (Saimiri spp.). Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science : JAALAS Huss, M. K., Ikeno, F., Buckmaster, C. L., Albertelli, M. A. 2015; 54 (1): 25-8

    Abstract

    Cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of mortality in aging squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.). However, data regarding echocardiographic measures obtained from clinically healthy nonsedated squirrel monkeys have not been published, and few electrocardiographic data are available. Here we obtained echocardiographs without sedation and electrocardiographs with minimal sedation from 63 clinically healthy squirrel monkeys that ranged from 3 to 20 y in age. 2D and M-mode echocardiography were performed on nonsedated monkeys to determine the left ventricular internal diameters at systole and diastole and the ejection fraction. Electrocardiography was performed under sedation with ketamine (15 mg/kg). Parameters evaluated included heart rate; P-wave duration; lengths of the PR, QRS, and QT intervals; R-wave amplitude, and P-wave amplitude. Initial physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography indicated normal cardiac function for all monkeys. The objectives of this study were to provide reference values for nonsedated echocardiography and ketamine-sedated electrocardiography of clinically normal squirrel monkeys and to determine correlates of age and sex in these values.

    View details for PubMedID 25651087

  • Prevalence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in 120 Archived Specimens of Lithobates catesbeianus (American Bullfrog) Collected in California, 1924-2007 ECOHEALTH Huss, M., Huntley, L., Vredenburg, V., Johns, J., Green, S. 2013; 10 (4): 339-343

    Abstract

    The chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been identified as a major cause of the recent worldwide amphibian decline. Numerous species in North America alone are under threat or have succumbed to Bd-driven population extinctions. The American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) has been reported as a tolerant carrier of Bd. In this report, we used a qPCR assay to test 120 archived American bullfrog specimens collected between 1924 and 2007 in California, USA and Baja California, Mexico. The overall prevalence of Bd infection in this archived population of L. catesbeianus was 19.2%. The earliest positive specimen was collected in Sacramento County, California, USA in 1928 and is to date the earliest positive archived Bd specimen reported globally. These data demonstrate that Bd-infected wild amphibians have been present in California longer than previously known.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10393-013-0895-6

    View details for Web of Science ID 000332375100003

    View details for PubMedID 24419668