Bio


I am an MD/PhD (Epidemiology) candidate, infectious diseases epidemiologist, and global health policy scientist. My work draws upon diverse quantitative methodologies to inform policy in global infectious diseases.

Honors & Awards


  • Media coverage, New York Times, BBC, The Guardian, NPR, San Francisco Chronicle, Scientific American, NBC News
  • Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP), National Institutes of Health (NIH) (2016)
  • Kass Award, Infectious Diseases Society of America (2016)
  • Clinical Research Mentorship (CRM) grantee, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (2015)
  • Medical Scholar, Infectious Diseases Society of America (2015)
  • Benjamin H. Kean Fellow, American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (2015)
  • Young Investigator Award, Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (2015)
  • Student/Post-Doc Travel Award, American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (2014)
  • Outstanding Senior, Rice University Department of Bioengineering (2013)

Professional Affiliations and Activities


  • Member, American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (2015 - Present)
  • Student advisory board member, END7 (Sabin Vaccine Institute) (2014 - 2015)
  • Member, Infectious Diseases Society of America (2015 - Present)
  • Member, Neglected Tropical Diseases Modeling Consortium (2014 - Present)

Education & Certifications


  • Bachelor of Science, Rice University, Bioengineering (2013)

Lab Affiliations


All Publications


  • A call to strengthen the global strategy against schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis: the time is now. The Lancet. Infectious diseases Lo, N. C., Addiss, D. G., Hotez, P. J., King, C. H., Stothard, J. R., Evans, D. S., Colley, D. G., Lin, W., Coulibaly, J. T., Bustinduy, A. L., Raso, G., Bendavid, E., Bogoch, I. I., Fenwick, A., Savioli, L., Molyneux, D., Utzinger, J., Andrews, J. R. 2017; 17 (2): e64-e69

    Abstract

    In 2001, the World Health Assembly (WHA) passed the landmark WHA 54.19 resolution for global scale-up of mass administration of anthelmintic drugs for morbidity control of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis, which affect more than 1·5 billion of the world's poorest people. Since then, more than a decade of research and experience has yielded crucial knowledge on the control and elimination of these helminthiases. However, the global strategy has remained largely unchanged since the original 2001 WHA resolution and associated WHO guidelines on preventive chemotherapy. In this Personal View, we highlight recent advances that, taken together, support a call to revise the global strategy and guidelines for preventive chemotherapy and complementary interventions against schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis. These advances include the development of guidance that is specific to goals of morbidity control and elimination of transmission. We quantify the result of forgoing this opportunity by computing the yearly disease burden, mortality, and lost economic productivity associated with maintaining the status quo. Without change, we estimate that the population of sub-Saharan Africa will probably lose 2·3 million disability-adjusted life-years and US$3·5 billion of economic productivity every year, which is comparable to recent acute epidemics, including the 2014 Ebola and 2015 Zika epidemics. We propose that the time is now to strengthen the global strategy to address the substantial disease burden of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S1473-3099(16)30535-7

    View details for PubMedID 27914852

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5280090

  • The Perils of Trumping Science in Global Health — The Mexico City Policy and Beyond New England Journal of Medicine Lo, N. C., Barry, M. 2017

    View details for DOI 10.1056/NEJMp1701294

  • Assessment of global guidelines for preventive chemotherapy against schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis: a cost-effectiveness modelling study LANCET INFECTIOUS DISEASES Lo, N. C., Lai, Y., Karagiannis-Voules, D., Bogoch, I. I., Coulibaly, J. T., Bendavid, E., Utzinger, J., Vounatsou, P., Andrews, J. R. 2016; 16 (9): 1065-1075

    Abstract

    WHO guidelines recommend annual treatment for schistosomiasis or soil-transmitted helminthiasis when prevalence in school-aged children is at or above a threshold of 50% and 20%, respectively. Separate treatment guidelines are used for these two helminthiases, and integrated community-wide treatment is not recommended. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of changing prevalence thresholds and treatment guidelines under an integrated delivery framework.We developed a dynamic, age-structured transmission and cost-effectiveness model that simulates integrated preventive chemotherapy programmes against schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis. We assessed a 5-year treatment programme with praziquantel (40 mg/kg per treatment) against schistosomiasis and albendazole (400 mg per treatment) against soil-transmitted helminthiasis at 75% coverage. We defined strategies as highly cost-effective if the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was less than the World Bank classification for a low-income country (gross domestic product of US$1045 per capita). We calculated the prevalence thresholds for cost-effective preventive chemotherapy of various strategies, and estimated treatment needs for sub-Saharan Africa.Annual preventive chemotherapy against schistosomiasis was highly cost-effective in treatment of school-aged children at a prevalence threshold of 5% (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 1·7-5·2; current guidelines recommend treatment at 50% prevalence) and for community-wide treatment at a prevalence of 15% (7·3-18·5; current recommendation is unclear, some community treatment recommended at 50% prevalence). Annual preventive chemotherapy against soil-transmitted helminthiasis was highly cost-effective in treatment of school-aged children at a prevalence of 20% (95% UI 5·4-30·5; current guidelines recommend treatment at 20% prevalence) and the entire community at 60% (35·3-85·1; no guidelines available). When both helminthiases were co-endemic, prevalence thresholds using integrated delivery were lower. Using this revised treatment framework, we estimated that treatment needs would be six times higher than WHO guidelines for praziquantel and two times higher for albendazole. An additional 21·3% (95% Bayesian credible interval 20·4-22·2) of the population changed from receiving non-integrated treatment under WHO guidelines to integrated treatment (both praziquantel and albendazole). Country-specific economic differences resulted in heterogeneity around these prevalence thresholds.Annual preventive chemotherapy programmes against schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis are likely to be highly cost-effective at prevalences lower than WHO recommendations. These findings support substantial treatment scale-up, community-wide coverage, integrated treatment in co-endemic settings that yield substantial cost synergies, and country-specific treatment guidelines.Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Mount Sinai Hospital-University Health Network AMO Innovation Fund, and Stanford University Medical Scholars Programme.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S1473-3099(16)30073-1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000381655200036

    View details for PubMedID 27286968

  • Abstinence Funding Was Not Associated With Reductions In HIV Risk Behavior In Sub-Saharan Africa HEALTH AFFAIRS Lo, N. C., Lowe, A., Bendavid, E. 2016; 35 (5): 856-863

    Abstract

    The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has been the largest funder of abstinence and faithfulness programming in sub-Saharan Africa, with a cumulative investment of over US $1.4 billion in the period 2004-13. We examined whether PEPFAR funding for abstinence and faithfulness programs, which aimed to reduce the risk of HIV transmission, was associated with a relative change in five outcomes indicative of high-risk sexual behavior: number of sexual partners in the past twelve months for men and for women, age at first sexual intercourse for men and for women, and teenage pregnancies. Using nationally representative surveys from twenty-two sub-Saharan African countries, we compared trends between people living in countries that received PEPFAR abstinence and faithfulness funding and those living in countries that did not in the period 1998-2013. We found no evidence to suggest that PEPFAR funding was associated with population-level reductions in any of the five outcomes. These results suggest that alternative funding priorities for HIV prevention may yield greater health benefits.

    View details for DOI 10.1377/hlthaff.2015.0828

    View details for Web of Science ID 000375796700015

    View details for PubMedID 27140992

  • Comparison of community-wide, integrated mass drug administration strategies for schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis: a cost-effectiveness modelling study. The Lancet. Global health Lo, N. C., Bogoch, I. I., Blackburn, B. G., Raso, G., N'Goran, E. K., Coulibaly, J. T., Becker, S. L., Abrams, H. B., Utzinger, J., Andrews, J. R. 2015; 3 (10): e629-38

    Abstract

    More than 1·5 billion people are affected by schistosomiasis or soil-transmitted helminthiasis. WHO's recommendations for mass drug administration (MDA) against these parasitic infections emphasise treatment of school-aged children, using separate treatment guidelines for these two helminthiases groups. We aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of expanding integrated MDA to the entire community in four settings in Côte d'Ivoire.We extended previously published, dynamic, age-structured models of helminthiases transmission to simulate costs and disability averted with integrated MDA (of praziquantel and albendazole) for schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis. We calibrated the model to data for prevalence and intensity of species-specific helminth infection from surveys undertaken in four communities in Côte d'Ivoire between March, 1997, and September, 2010. We simulated a 15-year treatment programme with 75% coverage in only school-aged children; school-aged children and preschool-aged children; adults; and the entire community. Treatment costs were estimated at US$0·74 for school-aged children and $1·74 for preschool-aged children and adults. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated in 2014 US dollars per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) averted.Expanded community-wide treatment was highly cost effective compared with treatment of only school-aged children (ICER $167 per DALY averted) and WHO guidelines (ICER $127 per DALY averted), and remained highly cost effective even if treatment costs for preschool-aged children and adults were ten times greater than those for school-aged children. Community-wide treatment remained highly cost effective even when elimination of helminth infections was not achieved. These findings were robust across the four diverse communities in Côte d'Ivoire, only one of which would have received annual MDA for both schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis under the latest WHO guidelines. Treatment every 6 months was also highly cost effective in three out of four communities.Integrated, community-wide MDA programmes for schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis can be highly cost effective, even in communities with low disease burden in any helminth group. These results support an urgent need to re-evaluate current global guidelines for helminthiases control programmes to include community-wide treatment, increased treatment frequency, and consideration for lowered prevalence thresholds for integrated treatment.Stanford University Medical Scholars Programme, Mount Sinai Hospital-University Health Network AMO Innovation Fund.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S2214-109X(15)00047-9

    View details for PubMedID 26385302

  • Comparison of sensitivity and faecal egg counts of Mini-FLOTAC using fixed stool samples and Kato-Katz technique for the diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni and soil-transmitted helminths ACTA TROPICA Coulibaly, J. T., Ouattara, M., Becker, S. L., Lo, N. C., Keiser, J., N'Goran, E. K., Ianniellog, D., Rinaldi, L., Cringoli, G., Utzinger, J. 2016; 164: 107-116
  • Evaluation of a Urine Pooling Strategy for the Rapid and Cost-Efficient Prevalence Classification of Schistosomiasis. PLoS neglected tropical diseases Lo, N. C., Coulibaly, J. T., Bendavid, E., N'Goran, E. K., Utzinger, J., Keiser, J., Bogoch, I. I., Andrews, J. R. 2016; 10 (8)

    Abstract

    A key epidemiologic feature of schistosomiasis is its focal distribution, which has important implications for the spatial targeting of preventive chemotherapy programs. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of a urine pooling strategy using a point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen (POC-CCA) cassette test for detection of Schistosoma mansoni, and employed simulation modeling to test the classification accuracy and efficiency of this strategy in determining where preventive chemotherapy is needed in low-endemicity settings.We performed a cross-sectional study involving 114 children aged 6-15 years in six neighborhoods in Azaguié Ahoua, south Côte d'Ivoire to characterize the sensitivity and specificity of the POC-CCA cassette test with urine samples that were tested individually and in pools of 4, 8, and 12. We used a Bayesian latent class model to estimate test characteristics for individual POC-CCA and quadruplicate Kato-Katz thick smears on stool samples. We then developed a microsimulation model and used lot quality assurance sampling to test the performance, number of tests, and total cost per school for each pooled testing strategy to predict the binary need for school-based preventive chemotherapy using a 10% prevalence threshold for treatment.The sensitivity of the urine pooling strategy for S. mansoni diagnosis using pool sizes of 4, 8, and 12 was 85.9%, 79.5%, and 65.4%, respectively, when POC-CCA trace results were considered positive, and 61.5%, 47.4%, and 30.8% when POC-CCA trace results were considered negative. The modeled specificity ranged from 94.0-97.7% for the urine pooling strategies (when POC-CCA trace results were considered negative). The urine pooling strategy, regardless of the pool size, gave comparable and often superior classification performance to stool microscopy for the same number of tests. The urine pooling strategy with a pool size of 4 reduced the number of tests and total cost compared to classical stool microscopy.This study introduces a method for rapid and efficient S. mansoni prevalence estimation through examining pooled urine samples with POC-CCA as an alternative to widely used stool microscopy.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004894

    View details for PubMedID 27504954

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4978437

  • Cost-effectiveness of community-wide treatment for helminthiasis--Authors' reply. The Lancet. Global health Lo, N. C., Bogoch, I. I., Utzinger, J., Andrews, J. R. 2016; 4 (3): e157-8

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S2214-109X(15)00278-8

    View details for PubMedID 26848087

  • Improving helminth treatment access: costs and opportunities. The Lancet. Infectious diseases Lo, N. C., Andrews, J. R., Bogoch, I. I. 2016; 16 (7): 762–64

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S1473-3099(16)30049-4

    View details for PubMedID 27352742

  • Strategies for last mile implementation of global health technologies The Lancet. Global health Chao*, T. E., Lo*, N. C., Mody, G. N., Sinha, S. R., (*co-first authorship) 2014; 2 (9): e497-8
  • Interaction of Shiga Toxin with the A-domains and Multimers of von Willebrand Factor JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY Lo, N. C., Turner, N. A., Cruz, M. A., Moake, J. 2013; 288 (46): 33118-33123

    Abstract

    Shiga toxin (Stx) produced by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli causes diarrhea-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome (DHUS), a severe renal thrombotic microangiopathy. We investigated the interaction between Stx and von Willebrand Factor (VWF), a multimeric plasma glycoprotein that mediates platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation. Stx bound to ultra-large VWF (ULVWF) secreted from and anchored to stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells, as well as to immobilized VWF-rich human umbilical vein endothelial cell supernatant. This Stx binding was localized to the A1 and A2 domain of VWF monomeric subunits and reduced the rate of ADAMTS-13-mediated cleavage of the Tyr(1605)-Met(1606) peptide bond in the A2 domain. Stx-VWF interaction and the associated delay in ADAMTS-13-mediated cleavage of VWF may contribute to the pathophysiology of DHUS.

    View details for DOI 10.1074/jbc.M113.487413

    View details for Web of Science ID 000328841700027

    View details for PubMedID 24097977

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC3829160

  • The Aging of Biomedical Research in the United States PLOS ONE Matthews, K. R., Calhoun, K. M., Lo, N., Ho, V. 2011; 6 (12)

    Abstract

    In the past 30 years, the average age of biomedical researchers has steadily increased. The average age of an investigator at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) rose from 39 to 51 between 1980 and 2008. The aging of the biomedical workforce was even more apparent when looking at first-time NIH grantees. The average age of a new investigator was 42 in 2008, compared to 36 in 1980. To determine if the rising barriers at NIH for entry in biomedical research might impact innovative ideas and research, we analyzed the research and publications of Nobel Prize winners from 1980 to 2010 to assess the age at which their pioneering research occurred. We established that in the 30-year period, 96 scientists won the Nobel Prize in medicine or chemistry for work related to biomedicine, and that their groundbreaking research was conducted at an average age of 41-one year younger than the average age of a new investigator at NIH. Furthermore, 78% of the Nobel Prize winners conducted their research before the age of 51, the average age of an NIH principal investigator. This suggested that limited access to NIH might inhibit research potential and novel projects, and could impact biomedicine and the next generation scientists in the United States.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0029738

    View details for Web of Science ID 000300676300082

    View details for PubMedID 22216352

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC3247288